Stephanie Curci

Department Chair. “We’re all constantly learning from one another, and the students keep teaching me how to teach them.”

I’m inspired by how many different ways there are to teach and how different the kids are from one another and from me. In a class with 15 students, there are 15 new lenses on Goodbye Columbus or Fences or Midnight’s Children, and I never know what they will be. We’re all constantly learning from one another, and the students keep teaching me how to teach them.

In my senior elective on postcolonial India this fall, the discussion on language and power that I introduced at the beginning of the term became more resonant for all of us because my students who are bilingual or who come from multilingual countries kept pursuing it. One student’s focus on feminism in the novel pushed past my own engagement with the female characters and provoked great discussion that was sustained because it mattered so much to her.

Teaching seems to be a job where there is no “enough”: You’re never done. I find that humbling but also a great challenge, an intellectual one and a social one. When students and I find points of contact between a text, one another, and our lives inside and outside the class—our homes, our families, a French class, an economics lecture—it feels magical. That’s when the kids are excited to share but equally excited to listen and learn. When we get it right as a class, it’s amazing. I know we made it happen together, and I was the smallest part of that.

Reprinted from Andover magazine.

scurci@andover.edu
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