December 15, 2021 Academic Calendar
12/15/2021 1:30 PM 12/15/2021 2:00 PM America/New_York Andover Peabody Institute of Archaeology Webinar - Diggin' In Series

Wednesday, December 15th, at 1:30 p.m. EDT: Join us for Season 3, Episode 10 of the Peabody Diggin’ In series, “Archaeology of American Protests: Documenting the Places and Things of Communal Action,” with guest speaker, Dr. April Beisaw

The freedom to protest against those who hold power is a defining characteristic of American citizenship. This freedom does not mean that protesters go unpunished, only that American democracy might be influenced by their cries for justice. How influential a single protest event can be is often tied to how radical the call to action is and who the changes will benefit. The archaeology of American protests acknowledges the longevity of struggles and can connect places and events through time to help frame each new action as part of battles yet-to-be won. A contemporary archaeology of the 1969-71 occupation of Alcatraz Island by the Indians of All Tribes reveals how it is connected to the Dakota Access Pipeline Protests at Standing Rock (2016-2017), and many other Native American protests. Sites, artifacts, and landscapes can bear witness to the agency of protesters and the pain endured by those who defy dominant powers. Please sign up for this webinar at our online registration page.

Zoom Event

Peabody Institute of Archaeology Webinar - Diggin' In Series

1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. , Zoom Event

Wednesday, December 15th, at 1:30 p.m. EDT: Join us for Season 3, Episode 10 of the Peabody Diggin’ In series, “Archaeology of American Protests: Documenting the Places and Things of Communal Action,” with guest speaker, Dr. April Beisaw

The freedom to protest against those who hold power is a defining characteristic of American citizenship. This freedom does not mean that protesters go unpunished, only that American democracy might be influenced by their cries for justice. How influential a single protest event can be is often tied to how radical the call to action is and who the changes will benefit. The archaeology of American protests acknowledges the longevity of struggles and can connect places and events through time to help frame each new action as part of battles yet-to-be won. A contemporary archaeology of the 1969-71 occupation of Alcatraz Island by the Indians of All Tribes reveals how it is connected to the Dakota Access Pipeline Protests at Standing Rock (2016-2017), and many other Native American protests. Sites, artifacts, and landscapes can bear witness to the agency of protesters and the pain endured by those who defy dominant powers. Please sign up for this webinar at our online registration page.

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