September 14, 2022 Academic Calendar
09/14/2022 1:30 PM 09/14/2022 2:00 PM America/New_York Andover Peabody Institute of Archaeology Webinar - Diggin' In Series

Join us for Season 5, Episode 4 of the Peabody Diggin’ In series – Plants, People, and Places: Using Phytoliths to Trace Land Use and Diet in 17th Century Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Plant remains from archaeological contexts can be one of the most useful ways to understand land use and diet. While paleoethnobotanical techniques like pollen, charcoal, and seed analysis have proven useful in New England, phytolith analysis has been underutilized. Phytoliths, or “plant stones,” are silicafilled cells that are left behind in sediments when a plant dies and indicate the presence of grasses and other important plants. In this talk, I will give an introduction on phytolith analysis and
how this microbotanical technique can help us learn more about diet and land use patterns throughout the colonial period in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

About our Guest Speaker: Anya Gruber is a Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology at the University of Texas in Austin. Her research focuses on paleoethnobotany in New England and public outreach. She is also a writer and science communicator.

Please sign up for this webinar at our online registration page.

Online Zoom Event

Peabody Institute of Archaeology Webinar - Diggin' In Series

1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. , Online Zoom Event

Join us for Season 5, Episode 4 of the Peabody Diggin’ In series – Plants, People, and Places: Using Phytoliths to Trace Land Use and Diet in 17th Century Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Plant remains from archaeological contexts can be one of the most useful ways to understand land use and diet. While paleoethnobotanical techniques like pollen, charcoal, and seed analysis have proven useful in New England, phytolith analysis has been underutilized. Phytoliths, or “plant stones,” are silicafilled cells that are left behind in sediments when a plant dies and indicate the presence of grasses and other important plants. In this talk, I will give an introduction on phytolith analysis and
how this microbotanical technique can help us learn more about diet and land use patterns throughout the colonial period in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

About our Guest Speaker: Anya Gruber is a Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology at the University of Texas in Austin. Her research focuses on paleoethnobotany in New England and public outreach. She is also a writer and science communicator.

Please sign up for this webinar at our online registration page.

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