Winter Term Information for Phillips Academy Families

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November 1, 2021 On Campus
11/01/2021 5:00 PM 11/01/2021 6:00 PM America/New_York Andover The Monster Out of the Closet: Trans Monstrosity and Metaphor in Hollywood Horror

Dorian Park Wang ’23
Brace Student Fellow Presentation

On the silver screen, the trans/queer subject has long been regarded as monstrous. The sissy villain, the trans predator, the deceitful “trap,” the subject of extended vomit montages, the psycho killer clad in women’s skins, abjected. Film, within the modern age, wields immense influence in its ability to construct major images and conceptions of marginalized groups for public consumption. Because the majority of the American public (80 percent, according to GLAAD) does not personally know a trans person, film and media often serve as the only interaction they will have with trans identity. These portrayals in cinema thus become the primary channel through which trans identity is understood, by cis and trans audiences alike.

In this project, Dorian Park Wang ’23 draws on theories of the grotesque and abject to examine trans monster metaphors in cinema. Through discussion of Frankenstein (1931), Psycho (1960), and The Silence of the Lambs (1991), Park Wang posits that this analysis holds the potential for dismantling transphobia in visual narratives.

Open to the PA community; dinner will be served.

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Marissa Schwalm, Instructor in English

School Room, Abbot Hall

The Monster Out of the Closet: Trans Monstrosity and Metaphor in Hollywood Horror

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m., School Room, Abbot Hall

Dorian Park Wang ’23
Brace Student Fellow Presentation

On the silver screen, the trans/queer subject has long been regarded as monstrous. The sissy villain, the trans predator, the deceitful “trap,” the subject of extended vomit montages, the psycho killer clad in women’s skins, abjected. Film, within the modern age, wields immense influence in its ability to construct major images and conceptions of marginalized groups for public consumption. Because the majority of the American public (80 percent, according to GLAAD) does not personally know a trans person, film and media often serve as the only interaction they will have with trans identity. These portrayals in cinema thus become the primary channel through which trans identity is understood, by cis and trans audiences alike.

In this project, Dorian Park Wang ’23 draws on theories of the grotesque and abject to examine trans monster metaphors in cinema. Through discussion of Frankenstein (1931), Psycho (1960), and The Silence of the Lambs (1991), Park Wang posits that this analysis holds the potential for dismantling transphobia in visual narratives.

Open to the PA community; dinner will be served.

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Marissa Schwalm, Instructor in English

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