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Course of Study General Info Pages 2-11

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Art

ART-225A, Visual Studies 2D Studio
Five class periods. For Juniors and Lowers. In this studio students use two-dimensional media (e.g.drawing, collage, painting, mixed media, artists' books) and photography to expand their perceptual, conceptual, and technical skills, and develop the visual language needed to communicate their experiences and ideas.

ART-225B, Visual Studies 3D Studio
Five class periods. For Juniors and Lowers. In this studio students use three-dimensional media (e.g.wire, clay, wax, paper, plaster) and photography to expand their perceptual, conceptual, and technical skills. By expanding their visual literacy students are able to observe, critically and analytically, their surroundings and visual culture.

ART-225C, Visual Studies Media Studio
Five class periods. For Juniors and Lowers. In this studio students make photographs and short videos to focus on two central areas of media: photography and time-based images (film/video). Through projects, presentations, and discussions students explore how these media have changed the ways people perceive the world, and express their ideas and feelings.

ART-300/3, Visual Culture: Discovering the Addison Collection
Four class periods. Throughout the term, students will view selections from the collection of the Addison Gallery as it relates to the history and context of American art. Each week, various themes will be explored and diverse works from the collection will be viewed and discussed from a perceptual point of view. Students will meet the gallery staff and experience what makes a museum function. Readings, writing assignments and research projects will help students engage, confront and discuss a wide range of art forms and imagery. Issues surrounding the making and viewing of art will be explored. As a culminating project for the term, students will curate an exhibition. (Ms. Crivelli and members of the Addison Staff) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-301, Architecture I
Four class periods. This course will introduce the basic principles of architectural design through a sequence of related projects in drawing, site analysis, and research into precedent, culminating in the design of a space or structure. The design projects throughout the three terms will address architectural design in different contexts-a natural setting (Fall), interface with an existing structure (Winter), and in an urban context (Spring), so that a student wishing to continue with architecture at the 401 level can work with a variety of design issues. With hands-on sketches, drawings, and models, students will explore the issues of a well-thought-out structure and learn to see the environment in terms of human scale, materials, and the organization of space. Class time will include discussions and demonstrations, as well as studio time. There will be a required evening lab. A student wishing to take architecture for a full-year should begin with ART-301 in the fall.(TBD) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-302, Clay and the Ancestral Pot
Five class periods. This interdisciplinary class explores the exciting intersections between the disciplines of archeology, geology, and studio art. In the studio classroom, students will explore the nature of clay, ceramic techniques, aesthetic considerations, and the role of clay in human evolution. The Peabody Museum of Archeology's collection will offer historical context and a rich array of objects to frame class discussions and assignments. Do you want to dig your own clay? How about using satellite imagery and soil maps to help you find it? In the fall trimester, a field component will take students out into the environment to source and dig residual clays. Students will make their own ceramic artwork from locally sourced and refined clays. The fall-term culminates with the pit firing of hand-made ceramics using traditional - primitive - methods. (Mr. Zaeder) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-304, Drawing I
Four class periods. This course will provide students with a sequential exploration of drawing methods and concepts. Students learn through in-class exercises and formal assignments, skills and concepts relating to contour, gesture and full rendered drawings. Students will work with a variety of materials. Concepts include the depiction of three-dimensional form on a two-dimensional plane, use of light and dark contrast, and use of proportion and perspective sighting. Assignments are designed to develop the students' skills in direct observation and to encourage creative, expressive thinking. Students will work with still life set ups, the surrounding environment and the figure. (Ms. Crivelli, Ms Trespas) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-305, Painting I
Five class periods. This class is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of painting with water-mixable oil paint or acrylic paint. Specific problems are assigned to facilitate the study of fundamental paint handling, color mixing, and blending. Issues of form and space relationships, composition, and development of ideas are addressed in balance with the student's need for self-expression. Class critiques, slide talks, and visits to the Addison Gallery complement and enhance the actual painting process. (Ms. Trespas) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-306, Photography I
Five class periods. This introductory black and white film course will explore, through presentations, demonstrations, and group critique, traditional photographic image-making. Beginning with basic camera manipulations and film processing, students will be encouraged to explore the magic of light-sensitive silver materials with laboratory instruction in printing fine art images with variable contrast filters. Assignments and discussions of historical landscape, portrait and/or still life genres will further direct each student to examine how a photographer carefully selects and represents his or her vision of the world. A supervised evening lab opportunity provides additional time for technical help and individual critique with the instructor. Class meets four periods a week, with five hours of preparation. Rental film cameras are available from the art department. (Ms. Harrigan and department) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-307, Mixed Media Printmaking
Five class periods. Students discover and develop personal imagery while learning several types of printmaking techniques, including relief, monoprint, drypoint, and collography. Images are constructed through collage, drawing, and painting on - and carving into - surfaces such as rubber, wood, metal or plastic. These are inked, in most cases with water based inks, and transferred to paper by hand or by means of a printing press. Often several impressions will be "pulled" from one printing plate and combined with another. A collaborative project, book arts and digital printing methods are also explored. Emphasis is on gaining technical, conceptual, and formal skills while developing a student's ideas through various types of printing and mixed media combinations. Critiques, slide talks, and field trips to the Museum of Printing and the Addison Gallery contribute to student understanding of the history, concepts and processes behind printmaking. (Ms. Trespas) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-308, Sculpture I
Five class periods. Winter Term - Sculpture I: Clay, Plaster, and Metal. Sculpture has become an all-inclusive field, with contemporary sculptors working in a wide range of media. In this class we will work with a variety of materials, such as wood, clay, plaster, paper and metal. Students will have the opportunity to learn a basic set of technical and conceptual skills for working and thinking three-dimensionally. Projects will involve an investigation of the communicative potential of materials, structure, imagery, and context through a process of research, invention, discovery, and discussion. (Ms. Zemlin) Spring Term - 3-D Structures and Hand Papermaking. Paper generally functions as a two-dimensional matrix for book pages, text, and other printed matter, but it is also a versatile material for creating three-dimensional structures. This class will introduce students to paper casting, armature construction, and hand papermaking. Technical demonstrations, assignments, and exposure to a wide range of historical and contemporary artwork will help students develop imagery of their own design. For the casting project, students will create a clay relief, which will be used to generate a plaster mold, and ultimately a series of paper casts. In the armature project, students will work with wire, reed, and other materials to create a three-dimensional structure, which will then involve the application of a "skin" of handmade paper. Students will learn to make paper by hand, starting with kozo, the bark of the Japanese mulberry tree. There will be a required evening lab. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-309, Video I
This course focuses on storytelling in the time-based medium of video. Students learn to identify stories, develop their ideas using principles and techniques of time-based media, and shoot and edit their own productions. Class time will include viewing and discussing both professional and student work chosen to show ways one conveys ideas by means of images and sound. Following an initial project focused on camera work and editing, there will be four assigned projects (non-fiction, fiction, experimental, and theme-based). Students interested in animation may use animation for these projects. Cameras, microphones, computer editing stations and software will be provided by the Polk-Lillard Center. Students with a background in video who think they may be prepared to go directly into ART-409 should consult with the instructor. (Ms. Veenema) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-310, Intro to Digital Photography: the Landscape
Four class periods. This introductory digital photography course examines the concept of beauty in the environment and how we appreciate the poetic or contemplative experience of a photograph. The color theory of light, color management, using adjustment layers and composite imagery with Adobe Photoshop tools will provide students with the solid knowledge base to produce an edited portfolio or visual book at term's end. Time-lapse photography will be demonstrated and discussed along with other techniques used in scientific inquiry that serve the efforts of environmental protection and preservation. (Ms. Harrigan) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-314, Woven Structures and Fabric
Five class periods. The class will explore the technical and conceptual potential of fabrics, surface design and woven structures in terms of function, cultural significance, pattern, abstraction and representation. Students will learn fiber techniques, such as weaving, pieced fabric collage and quilting, stenciling, digital printing on fabric, block printing, and tie-dye. In the process of learning a range of techniques, students will develop ideas and imagery based on personal interests, contemporary fine art, crafts, and the textile collections at the Peabody Museum. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-350, The Artist: Media and Meaning
Five class periods. For Uppers and Seniors. This course explores how artists develop images. While learning to think as artists, students will learn to develop ideas using visual language to communicate ideas. Student projects will focus on the expressive possibilities of image making with 2-D media, including the synergy between digital technologies and traditional hands-on applications of materials?digital photography, drawing, and collage. In class presentations and lectures, examples from art, film, and popular culture will provide context for discussions relevant to personal and cultural topics. (Ms. Crivelli, Ms. Veenema)

ART-400/1, Histories of Art
Five class periods. In 1923, Pablo Picasso wrote, "The fact that for a long time Cubism has not been understood and that even today there are people who cannot see anything in it, means nothing. I do not read English; an English book is a blank book to me. This does not mean that the English language does not exist, and why should I blame anybody else but myself if I cannot understand what I know nothing about?" Fueled by Picasso's sentiment, this multidisciplinary study of art serves two primary goals: students explore works of art as primary sources to unveil the time and place in which they were created, and students foster the literacy to read ably works of art, and other elements of visual culture, long after they depart the course. To meet these goals, students rely, in part, on traditional ways of reading and talking about art. With an emphasis on architecture, painting, and sculpture, students focus on the formal elements of composition, and they explore a narrative in which artists influence artists, a narrative in which art history is the study of the history of artistic "genius." Yet, students also constantly critique these traditional ways and recognize that works, even works of individual "genius," need to be seen within a larger social-cultural system. Throughout the year, students explore such questions as: Who was in position to make and own art? What was the context in which a work was produced? Can there be a single narrative of art, a single history? With these and other questions in mind, students pay particular attention to the effects of class, economics, gender, national identity, politics, race, religion, sexual orientation, technology, and urbanism on art and visual culture. The fall term begins with the great Gothic cathedral at Chartres, continues with the Early Renaissance, and concludes with the work of Leonardo da Vinci. Prerequisite: Open to lowers, uppers and seniors, who may take one, two or three terms; completion of ART-225 or ART-350 is recommended but is not required.

ART-400/2, Histories of Art
Five class periods. In 1923, Pablo Picasso wrote, "The fact that for a long time Cubism has not been understood and that even today there are people who cannot see anything in it, means nothing. I do not read English; an English book is a blank book to me. This does not mean that the English language does not exist, and why should I blame anybody else but myself if I cannot understand what I know nothing about?" Fueled by Picasso's sentiment, this multidisciplinary study of art serves two primary goals: students explore works of art as primary sources to unveil the time and place in which they were created, and students foster the literacy to read ably works of art, and other elements of visual culture, long after they depart the course. To meet these goals, students rely, in part, on traditional ways of reading and talking about art. With an emphasis on architecture, painting, and sculpture, students focus on the formal elements of composition, and they explore a narrative in which artists influence artists, a narrative in which art history is the study of the history of artistic "genius." Yet, students also constantly critique these traditional ways and recognize that works, even works of individual "genius," need to be seen within a larger social-cultural system. Throughout the year, students explore such questions as: Who was in position to make and own art? What was the context in which a work was produced? Can there be a single narrative of art, a single history? With these and other questions in mind, students pay particular attention to the effects of class, economics, gender, national identity, politics, race, religion, sexual orientation, technology, and urbanism on art and visual culture. The winter term opens with Michelangelo and the High Renaissance, continues with the Baroque, and ends with the 19th century, including the Impressionism of Claude Monet. Prerequisite: Open to lowers, uppers and seniors, who may take one, two or three terms; completion of ART-225, ART-250 or ART-350 is recommended but is not required.

ART-400/3, Histories of Art
Five class periods. In 1923, Pablo Picasso wrote, "The fact that for a long time Cubism has not been understood and that even today there are people who cannot see anything in it, means nothing. I do not read English; an English book is a blank book to me. This does not mean that the English language does not exist, and why should I blame anybody else but myself if I cannot understand what I know nothing about?" Fueled by Picasso's sentiment, this multidisciplinary study of art serves two primary goals: students explore works of art as primary sources to unveil the time and place in which they were created, and students foster the literacy to read ably works of art, and other elements of visual culture, long after they depart the course. To meet these goals, students rely, in part, on traditional ways of reading and talking about art. With an emphasis on architecture, painting, and sculpture, students focus on the formal elements of composition, and they explore a narrative in which artists influence artists, a narrative in which art history is the study of the history of artistic "genius." Yet, students also constantly critique these traditional ways and recognize that works, even works of individual "genius," need to be seen within a larger social-cultural system. Throughout the year, students explore such questions as: Who was in position to make and own art? What was the context in which a work was produced? Can there be a single narrative of art, a single history? With these and other questions in mind, students pay particular attention to the effects of class, economics, gender, national identity, politics, race, religion, sexual orientation, technology, and urbanism on art and visual culture. The spring term starts with Vincent van Gogh, continues with Pablo Picasso and Modern Art, and finishes with the Postmodern dismantling of the Eurocentric tradition that permeates contemporary visual culture. Prerequisite: Open to lowers, uppers and seniors, who may take one, two or three terms; completion of ART-225, ART-250 or ART-350 is recommended but is not required.

ART-401/2, Architecture II
Four class periods. ART-401 is designed as a continuation of ART-301 for students who wish to develop and expand their ideas further and pursue individualized projects. In consultation with the instructor, students will develop a term project that includes research and analysis, as well as a developed design. In this course there also will be the possibility to develop a multidisciplinary project in coordination with work in another class. A student wishing to take architecture for a full year should begin with ART-301 in the fall. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-501. (TBD) Prerequisite: ART-301 or permission of department chair.

ART-401/3, Architecture II
Four class periods. ART-401 is designed as a continuation of ART-301 for students who wish to develop and expand their ideas further and pursue individualized projects. In consultation with the instructor, students will develop a term project that includes research and analysis, as well as a developed design. In this course there also will be the possibility to develop a multidisciplinary project in coordination with work in another class. A student wishing to take architecture for a full year should begin with ART-301 in the fall. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-501. (TBD) Prerequisite: ART-301 or permission of department chair.

ART-402/1, Advanced Ceramics
Four class periods. This course is designed for students who have completed Clay and The Ancestral Pot (ART-302) and wish to continue their study of ceramics. As an advanced course, students will be asked to expand on their existing knowledge of ceramics, to strengthen their technical skills and to seek sophisticated solutions to given assignments. In addition to their own work in the studio, students can expect to pursue some research and inquiry into the work of contemporary ceramic artists. Outside reading and visits to the Peabody Museum of Archeology will also be a part of the course. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-502. (Mr. Zaeder) Prerequisite: ART-302 or permission of department chair.

ART-402/2, Advanced Ceramics
Four class periods. This course is designed for students who have completed Clay and The Ancestral Pot (ART-302) and wish to continue their study of ceramics. As an advanced course, students will be asked to expand on their existing knowledge of ceramics, to strengthen their technical skills and to seek sophisticated solutions to given assignments. In addition to their own work in the studio, students can expect to pursue some research and inquiry into the work of contemporary ceramic artists. Outside reading and visits to the Peabody Museum of Archeology will also be a part of the course. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-502. (Mr. Zaeder) Prerequisite: ART-302 or permission of the department chair.

ART-402/3, Advanced Ceramics
Five class periods. This course is designed for students who have completed Clay and The Ancestral Pot (ART-302) and wish to continue their study of ceramics. As an advanced course, students will be asked to expand on their existing knowledge of ceramics, to strengthen their technical skills and to seek sophisticated solutions to given assignments. In addition to their own work in the studio, students can expect to pursue some research and inquiry into the work of contemporary ceramic artists. Outside reading and visits to the Peabody Museum of Archeology will also be a part of the course. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-502. (Mr. Zaeder) Prerequisite: ART-302 or permission of the department chair.

ART-404, Drawing II
Four class periods. This course will focus on thematic subjects and will function on a more advanced level than Drawing I while continuing to stress the balance between perceptual skills, concept/compositional development and technique development. Scale, proportion, spatial studies, the understanding of color and the exploration of mixed-media will be some of the areas covered. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-504. Prerequisite: ART-304 or permission of department chair.

ART-405, Painting II
Five class periods. In advanced painting, students build on already-acquired technical experience from Painting I while developing their own image ideas. Through working from direct observation, technical processes and conceptual approaches, students explore different ways of working with acrylics and water-mixable oils. We will investigate different approaches that generate ideas for paintings. Painting in series, mixing media, innovating paint application, and utilizing collage and assemblage structure further extend the possibilities for thinking about what a painting can be. Emphasis is placed on cultivating solid technical skills as well as inventive and challenging approaches to subjects that encourage individual artistic and personal growth. Critiques, Addison Gallery visits, and exploration of artists' work and art historical issues relevant to the student's paintings are important components of this course. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-505. (Ms. Trespas) Prerequisite: ART-305 or permission of department chair.

ART-406, Special Topics in Photography: Images of Resistance and the Social Documentary Tradition
Four class periods. This course is designed for students who have successfully completed an introductory film (darkroom) or digital photography course and wish to continue with a photographic project in the social documentary tradition. Photographs often serve as powerful historical records of struggle and social change. Class discussions and student presentations will consider how socially responsible photographers represent a collective vision of change and reconciliation. Students will receive editorial guidance on a self-motivated individual or small group documentary project to be presented as an edited portfolio or visual book at the end of the term. Course work requires a working knowledge of either the GW Photography Darkroom Facility or the workflow of digital file management/processing/Photoshop adjustments. (Ms. Harrigan)

ART-408/2, Sculpture II
Four class periods. This class is an opportunity for students who have taken ART-308 to continue their investigation of sculpture. Another set of technical skills will be taught, along with readings, slide talks, and visits to the Addison Gallery. In developing projects, students will be asked to focus on a particular concept, approach, or set of materials throughout the term. There will be a required evening lab. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-508. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: ART-308 or permission of department chair.

ART-408/3, Sculpture II
Four class periods. This class is an opportunity for students who have taken ART-308 to continue their investigation of sculpture. Another set of technical skills will be taught, along with readings, slide talks, and visits to the Addison Gallery. In developing projects, students will be asked to focus on a particular concept, approach, or set of materials throughout the term. There will be a required evening lab. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-508. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: ART-308 or permission of department chair.

ART-409/2, Video II
Four class periods. This course gives students with a background in video an opportunity to deepen their knowledge of areas introduced in ART-309 and or pursue directions of their own choosing. Some students work on term-long projects while others choose to pursue several short projects. All students decide on goals for the term and design a term plan to meet their goals. Class time will include viewing and discussing the work of others to inform one's own work. Students enrolled in this course should have previous camera and editing experience. For students unfamiliar with the editing software available to them on compus, this course will include classes dedicated to the editing software used in the Polk-Lillard Electronic Imaging Center. Advanced students who wish to continue may enroll in ART-409 for more than one term. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-509. (Ms. Veenema) Prerequisite: ART-309 or permission of department chair.

ART-409/3, Video II
Four class periods. This course gives students with a background in video an opportunity to deepen their knowledge of areas introduced in ART-309 and or pursue directions of their own choosing. Some students work on term-long projects while others choose to pursue several short projects. All students decide on goals for the term and design a term plan to meet their goals. Class time will include viewing and discussing the work of others to inform one's own work. Students enrolled in this course should have previous camera and editing experience. For students unfamiliar with the editing software available to them on compus, this course will include classes dedicated to the editing software used in the Polk-Lillard Electronic Imaging Center. Advanced students who wish to continue may enroll in ART-409 for more than one term. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-509. (Ms. Veenema) Prerequisite: ART-309 or permission of department chair.

ART-410, Topics in Photography: Self and Other
Five class periods. This course is designed for students who have successfully completed an introductory film (darkroom) or digital photography course and wish to continue with a photographic project in the portrait tradition. The class will examine how people choose to represent self and other in studio and on location photography. Studio lighting techniques will be introduced and on-location electronic flash photography will be demonstrated. Topics of discussion include the history of portraiture from the self to celebrity. Students will receive editorial guidance on a self-motivated portrait book to be presented at the term's end. Course work requires a working knowledge of either the GW Photography Darkroom Facility or working skills of digital file management/processing/Photoshop adjustments. (Ms. Harrigan) Prerequisite: Art-306 or -310, or permission of the department chair.

ART-414, Woven Structures and Fabric II
Four class periods. This class is an opportunity for students who have taken ART-314 to continue their investigations of weaving and textiles. Students will further explore the materials and techniques learned in ART-314 in long-term projects or in several shorter term projects, depending on individual interests. Projects should focus on craft and the development of imagery and design. All students will be asked to identify goals for the term and design a term plan. It's recommended that students consult with Ms. Zemlin before signing up for the course. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: Art 314 or permission of department chair.

ART-420, The Quest for Identity: Explorations in Film and Mixed Media
Four class periods. Open to Lowers, Uppers and Seniors. As a culture we have always been fascinated by identity, by quests to forge one, or by the machinations to invent one. American artists Edward Hopper, Robert Frank, and Beverly Buchanan, for example, reflect observations of self or describe the identity of others relative to the world around them. For most of us, the search for identity is an unending process in a constantly changing, more global America. This search will be brought into focus through the viewing of films, discussions, and the creation of mixed-media projects based on students' personal ideas about identity. (Ms. Crivelli) Prerequisite: Foundation Course (ART-225 or ART-350) or permission of department chair.

ART-500/0, Advanced Studio Art
(A yearlong commitment) Five class periods. ART-500 is designed for Seniors. The course provides students with the opportunity to broaden their art experience at an advanced level and also study in-depth in areas of their choosing. Students will be guided through the process of assembling portfolios for college applications or Advanced Placement (AP) portfolios. In the fall term, students study broadly at an advanced level using a range of media and techniques. In the winter term students audit a 300/400-level course to focus on a specific medium, while also meeting weekly with the ART-500 class for readings, discussions, Addison Gallery events and field trips to art museums. In the spring term, students work on supervised independent projects that are either discipline-specific or cross-disciplinary in nature. As a culmination of the course students organize, curate, and install an exhibition of their work in the Gelb Gallery. Attendance at a weekly evening lab is required. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: Open to Seniors; diploma requirement in art and at least two additional 300 or 400-level studio art courses, or permission of department chair. A course in drawing is strongly recommended. Students interested in taking the course as uppers require permission of the department chair.

ART-501/2, Architecture III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-401 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (TBD)

ART-501/3, Architecture III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-401 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (TBD)

ART-502/1, Ceramics III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-402 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Zaeder)

ART-502/2, Ceramics III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-402 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Zaeder)

ART-502/3, Ceramics III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-402 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Zaeder)

ART-504, Drawing III
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-404 with an honors grade and with permission of the instructor. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Ms. Crivelli)

ART-505, Painting III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-405 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Ms. Trespas)

ART-506, Topics in Photography Ii: Images of Resistance & the Social Documentary Trad
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-406 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Ms. Harrigan)

ART-509/2, Video III
Four class periods. ART-509 gives advanced students the opportunity to pursue a direction of their own choosing (e.g. several short projects and or a term long project, projects focused on a specific subject of genre, animation, etc.) that meet their goals as filmmakers. As part of their work for the term students design their own production schedule for the term. In addition, all students are required on their own to view work by other filmmakers, write a short paper explaining what may or have influenced their own work, and show examples of this work to the class. At the end of the term students also write an artist's statement about their work and evaluate their work, which includes suggesting a grade for the term. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-509 may be taken more than once. A student with an honors grade or with permission of the instructor will be eligible to advance to ART-609. (Ms. Veenema) Prerequisite: ART-409 or permission of department chair.

ART-509/3, Video III
Four class periods. ART-509 gives advanced students the opportunity to pursue a direction of their own choosing (e.g. several short projects and or a term long project, projects focused on a specific subject of genre, animation, etc.) that meet their goals as filmmakers. As part of their work for the term students design their own production schedule for the term. In addition, all students are required on their own to view work by other filmmakers, write a short paper explaining what may or have influenced their own work, and show examples of this work to the class. At the end of the term students also write an artist's statement about their work and evaluate their work, which includes suggesting a grade for the term. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-509 may be taken more than once. A student with an honors grade or with permission of the instructor will be eligible to advance to ART-609. (Ms. Veenema) Prerequisite: ART-409 or permission of department chair.

ART-510, Topics in Photography Ii: Self and Other
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-410 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Ms. Harrigan)

ART-601/2, Architecture IV
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-501 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 600-level courses may be taken more than once. (TBD)

ART-601/3, Architecture IV
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-501 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 600-level courses may be taken more than once. (TBD)

ART-609/2, Video IV
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students who wish to continue working independently with video after completion of ART-509 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-609 may be taken more than once. (Ms. Veenema) Prerequisite: Honors grade in ART-509 or permission of department chair.

ART-609/3, Video IV
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students who wish to continue working independently with video after completion of ART-509 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-609 may be taken more than once. (Ms. Veenema) Prerequisite: Honors grade in ART-509 or permission of department chair.

Athletics

ATH-100, Basics

ATH-101, Basics

ATH-102, Aerobics

ATH-103, S.A.S.E

ATH-104, Baseball

ATH-105, Flexible Fitness Option

ATH-106, Basics

ATH-107, Pe/6th-Excused

ATH-108, Cluster

ATH-109, Crew

ATH-110, Medical Excuse

ATH-111, Training

ATH-112, Medical Excuse

ATH-113, P.T. With Trainers

ATH-114, Off Campus

ATH-115, P.T. With Trainers

ATH-116, Left School

ATH-117, Unassigned

ATH-120, Intramural Soccer

ATH-121, Cluster

ATH-122, Lacrosse

ATH-123, Cycling-Team

ATH-124, Dance

ATH-125, Golf

ATH-126, Search & Rescue

ATH-127, Softball

ATH-128, Fencing-Instruction

ATH-129, Squash Instruction

ATH-130, Left School

ATH-131, Swim Instruction

ATH-132, T'ai Chi Ch'uan

ATH-133, Tennis

ATH-134, Track

ATH-135, Ultimate Frisbee

ATH-136, Volleyball

ATH-137, Yoga

ATH-138, Left School

ATH-139, Medical Excuse

ATH-140, Pt With Trainers

ATH-141, Unassigned

ATH-142, Off Campus

ATH-145, Double Dutch

ATH-150, Off Campus

ATH-220, Crew-Fall-Boys

ATH-240, Crew-Fall-Girls

ATH-260, Cross Country Boys

ATH-280, Cross Country Girls

ATH-300, Dance

ATH-301, Dance

ATH-303, Basketball Junior

ATH-320, Field Hockey

ATH-340, Football-V

ATH-400, Basketball Boys

ATH-402, Basketball Girls

ATH-404, Hockey Boys

ATH-406, Hockey Girls

ATH-407, Intramural Hockey

ATH-408, Nordic Skiing

ATH-410, Squash Boys

ATH-412, Squash Girls

ATH-414, Swimming Boys

ATH-416, Swimming Girls

ATH-420, Track Boys

ATH-422, Track Girls

ATH-424, Wrestling

ATH-500, Search & Rescue

ATH-501, Search & Rescue

ATH-520, Slam

ATH-521, Slam

ATH-522, Sr. Squash

ATH-523, Rec. Cross Ctry. Skiing

ATH-524, Yoga

ATH-530, Skating - Instruction

ATH-540, Soccer-B

ATH-560, Soccer-G

ATH-580, Squash-Fall

ATH-600, Swimming-Fall

ATH-610, Instructional Diving

ATH-620, Tennis-Fall

ATH-624, Fitness Center

ATH-630, Tennis-Fall-Recreational

ATH-640, Volleyball

ATH-650, Tennis-Hodgson-A

ATH-660, Water Polo-G

ATH-680, Water Polo-B

ATH-700, Wrestling-Fall

ATH-720, Yoga

ATH-730, Touch Football-Fall

ATH-750, Tennis-Watt-A

ATH-770, Tennis-Wilken

ATH-800, Basketball Training

ATH-910, Students Who Have Not Taken/Passed Swim Test.

ATH-990, S.L.I.D.E.

ATH-999, Unassigned

Biology

BIOL-100/0, Introduction to Biology
Five class periods that include significant time in the laboratory. This course is for Juniors. BIOL-100 is theme-based and focused on major biological topics. Studying a core text will be supplemented with other readings, writing assignments, and data analysis and interpretation. Students will learn a variety of study skills and will have an introduction to library research tools. Laboratory experiments and fieldwork are designed to acquaint students with fundamental biological principles and to build skills in the methods and techniques used to elucidate those principles.

BIOL-420, Animal Behavior
Five class periods that include significant time in the laboratory or in the field. Open to Uppers and Seniors who have had one year of laboratory science, the course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles of animal behavior. The topics that receive the greatest emphasis are territoriality, aggression, mating strategies, courtship, parental behavior, migration, dominance, and the evolution of behavior patterns. Throughout the course, an effort is made to relate the behavior of animals to the behavior of humans. A project or a research paper will be required.

BIOL-421, Ornithology
Five class periods that include significant time in the laboratory or in the field. Open to Uppers and Seniors who have completed a yearlong science course. No other group of chordates has captured the human imagination like birds. In the United States alone, approximately 30 million homes have installed birdfeeders, and the sale of feeders, seed, binoculars, and bird guides has become a multibillion dollar business. The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth look into the world of birds by studying the behavior, anatomy, physiology, and natural history of these feathered vertebrates. The Andover area is rich in habitat diversity and corresponding bird species. A portion of the course will be dedicated to learning the identity (both visually and acoustically) of a segment of this local population. Labs will include numerous field trips and the study of the natural history of birds, using bird mounts, nesting boxes, feathers, and films.

BIOL-430, The Root of It All: Plants in the Modern World
Five class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. Plants play a central role in the ecology of Earth as well as in ancient and modern economies. They form the foundation of most ecosystems on earth, providing habitat for organisms, absorbing carbon dioxide and exhaling oxygen, playing a central role in cycling water and other nutrients, providing mankind with food, fuel and other resources, and have been mined for chemicals useful in industry and medicine. Further, plants are currently being developed and used as a vehicle for use in bioengineering and biotechnology. In this seminar course, you will explore the diverse role plants play in the world. After a brief introduction to the basic biology of plants, topics to be explored may include plant evolution, ecology and reproduction, invasive and parasitic plants, plants in medicine and pharmacology, plant domestication and agriculture, the use of plants in biotechnology, biofuels, bioremediation and industry. This is a research seminar course, so a variety of readings from multiple sources will be assigned and students will be expected to research and write a major term paper as part of their assessment.

BIOL-450, Microbiology
Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors who have had one year of laboratory science. From AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria to strep throat and the common cold, bacteria, parasites, and viruses affect our quality of life and are major obstacles to world development.This course will examine public health threats posed by selected microorganisms. We will study the biology and epidemiology of these microorganisms, learn how to keep ourselves healthy, and develop an awareness of personal and global public health issues.

BIOL-540, Topics in Advanced Biology I
Five class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. This is the first term of a year-long sequence covering advanced topics in biology. This term focuses primarily on the cell, touching on topics including cell structure and function, energy metabolism, cell reproduction, Mendelian and molecular genetics, DNA technology and genomics. Laboratory work is an integral part of this course. In addition, time is set aside in the fall to learn about Andover ecology. The yearlong syllabus for this course provides appropriate preparation for the College Board Subject Test but does not provide specific preparation for the AP exam. Prerequisite: One yearlong course in chemistry with a grade of 4 or better. Lowers who received a final grade of 3 or below in chemistry should enroll in a physics course upper year, and BIOL-540 senior year. Students who received a final grade of 6 in CHEM-250, 5 or 6 in CHEM-300 or a grade of 4 or higher in CHEM-550 or 580 should take BIOL-560, 570 and 580 instead. Final decisions about placement in BIOL-540 or BIOL-560, 570, 580 will be made by the department chair.

BIOL-540/5, Topics in Advanced Biology II
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. A continuation of BIOL-540. The final two terms of BIOL-540 emphasize evolution and the origins of life, animal diversity in form and function, human anatomy and physiology, plant biology and ecology. In addition, time is set aside in the winter to study major diseases of the world, and in the spring to discuss important global ecological issues. The yearlong syllabus for this course provides appropriate preparation for the College Board Subject Test but does not provide specific preparation for the AP exam. Prerequisite: Completion of fall term BIOL-540

BIOL-560, Cellular Biology
Six class periods including time each week in the laboratory. Following a brief review of chemical principles, the course examines the major classes of biomolecules and how they are synthesized and degraded in the cell, with emphasis on reactions associated with energy conversion pathways such as respiration and photosynthesis. Enzyme function is considered both in terms of mechanisms of action and with regard to kinetics. The relationship between structure and function at the molecular level is emphasized in studies of molecular genetics and the control of genetic expression. Biotechnology is introduced through the laboratory. Not open to those who have had BIOL-540. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: A grade of 6 in CHEM-250, a 5 or higher in CHEM-300 or a 4 or higher in CHEM-550 or 580. The department chair will make final decisions about placement of students in BIOL-540 or BIOL-560, 570, 580.

BIOL-570, Human Anatomy and Physiology
Six class periods including an in-depth consideration of some of the major systems of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between structure and function at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organ system levels. Not open to those who have had BIOL-540. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: BIOL-560 or permission of the instructor and the department chair.

BIOL-580, Evolution and Ecology
Six class periods that include significant time in the laboratory or field. Sustainability and change are the central themes through which we will consider evolution and ecology. Evolution is a major unifying theme in biology, and the mechanism of natural selection serves as a foundation for examining ecosystems and relationships between populations, including humans. A short library research paper will be required. Not open to those who have had BIOL-540. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: BIOL-560 and/or 570 or permission of the instructor and the department chair.

BIOL-600, Molecular and Cellular Biology: Laboratory Research
Open to Uppers and Seniors. Permission of the instructor is required. Meets eight class periods (four double periods) a week. Students will learn laboratory techniques through work with model organisms and experimental systems such as bacteria, mammalian cell culture, and C. elegans. After learning a core of methodologies that are used in professional labs, students will apply them to focused research projects, often times performed in collaboration with professional scientists at other institutions. Reading articles in scientific journals is a significant part of a student's research. Students also will be asked to keep a lab journal and to write and present a scientific paper. This course, if failed, may not be made up by examination. Prerequisite: One year of 500-level biology and one year of chemistry with grades of 4 or above.

BIOL-610/1, Molecular and Cellular Biology: Independent Research
Students wishing to continue work from BIOL-600 may apply directly to the instructor fo permission to enroll in BIOL-610. Enrollment is limited and is at the discretion of the instructor and the chair of the Department of Biology. Laboratory schedules will be determined on a case-by-case basis; however, a student must be able to be in the lab for a minimum of eight hours per week at times when the instructor is available for supervision. This course is an advanced course that may require more than the standard nine hours of work per week. Requirements for successful completion of the term are similar to those for BIOL-600. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination.

BIOL-610/2, Molecular and Cellular Biology: Independent Research
Students wishing to continue work from BIOL-600 may apply directly to the instructor fo permission to enroll in BIOL-610. Enrollment is limited and is at the discretion of the instructor and the chair of the Department of Biology. Laboratory schedules will be determined on a case-by-case basis; however, a student must be able to be in the lab for a minimum of eight hours per week at times when the instructor is available for supervision. This course is an advanced course that may require more than the standard nine hours of work per week. Requirements for successful completion of the term are similar to those for BIOL-600. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination.

BIOL-610/3, Molecular and Cellular Biology: Independent Research
Students wishing to continue work from BIOL-600 may apply directly to the instructor fo permission to enroll in BIOL-610. Enrollment is limited and is at the discretion of the instructor and the chair of the Department of Biology. Laboratory schedules will be determined on a case-by-case basis; however, a student must be able to be in the lab for a minimum of eight hours per week at times when the instructor is available for supervision. This course is an advanced course that may require more than the standard nine hours of work per week. Requirements for successful completion of the term are similar to those for BIOL-600. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination.

Chemistry

CHEM-250/0, Introduction to Chemistry
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods per week. An introduction to the chemical view of the material world, including atomic theory, atomic structure, chemical reactions, the nature of solids, liquids, gases, and solutions, general equilibria, acid-base theories, electrochemistry, and aspects of nuclear chemistry. Emphasis is placed on developing problem-solving skills as well as on making connections between chemical principles and everyday life. A college-level text is used, but the pace of this course is adjusted to ensure that students have ample opportunity to ask questions. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. The syllabus is appropriate preparation for the College Board Subject Test. High honors work each term adequately prepares a student for CHEM-580. Co-requisite: Registration in MATH-210 or above. NOTE: This course is NOT open to Juniors.

CHEM-300/0, College Chemistry
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. This course is an introduction to the theoretical framework of modern chemistry, including atomic structure, chemical bonding, phase changes, solutions, chemical reactions, thermodynamics, kinetics, general equilibria, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, and aspects of inorganic and nuclear chemistry. Emphasis is placed on developing problem-solving skills and understanding the experimental basis of theories. A college-level text is used. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. The syllabus of this course is appropriate preparation for the College Board Subject Test. Co-requisite: Registration in at least MATH-320 or above, with the exception of those students enrolled in MATH-280. Prerequisite: Grade of 4 or above in the previous mathematics course. NOTE: Juniors who do not maintain an 85% average on the first two tests in CHEM-300 will be switched to BIOL-100 immediately.

CHEM-500/0, Advanced Placement Chemistry
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. CHEM-500 adheres to the revised AP Chemistry syllabus adopted in the 2013-14 school year. This course will focus on 6 "Big Ideas" in chemistry: the atomic model; property/structure correlations; changes that happen in chemical reactions; rates of reactions; the laws of thermodynamics; the breaking and making of chemical bonds. Students who qualify for CHEM-550 or -580 must sign up for those classes. Students not eligible for CHEM-550 or -580 who wish to take a second year of chemistry should sign up for this course after taking physics. This course may require more than the standard four to five house per week of homework. Prerequisite: One year of chemistry (either CHEM-250 or CHEM-300) and PHYS-400.

CHEM-550/0, Accelerated Advanced Chemistry
(A yearlong commitment) Six class periods, two of which are in the laboratory. This course is not open to students who have taken CHEM-300 or its equivalent, or to Juniors, with the exception of those Juniors enrolled in MATH-650. This is a rigourous course that treats the topics addressed in College Chemistry in greater depth and prepares students for the AP exam in chemistry. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours per week of homework. The syllabus of this course is appropriate preparation for the College Board Subject Test. Prerequisite: Grade of 5 or above in each term of CHEM-250. Students with no previous chemistry who are in MATH-380 or above may enroll in this course. Students with no previous chemistry who are in MATH-360 or below may enroll in this course only with permission from the department chair. Prerequisite: Grade of 5 or above in the previous mathematics course.

CHEM-580/0, Advanced College Chemistry
A yearlong commitment. Six class periods. This rigorous second-year course that builds on principles learned previously,prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination and includes topics beyond the AP syllabus. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours per week of homework. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. Students will have an opportunity to review current literature on selected topics or select a lab research topic in preparation for a class seminar they will present in lieu of a final exam at the end of the spring term. Prerequisite: Grade of 6 in each term of CHEM-250 or a 5 or above in each term of CHEM-300.

CHEM-610, Organic Chemistry
Four class periods per week. This course introduces many of the basic reactions and concepts students will encounter in their future studies of chemistry, biology, or medicine. Rather than covering a large number of reactions, as might happen in a second-year (full year) college organic chemistry course, this course emphasizes an understanding of general principles of reactivity and mechanism. The classroom work is supplemented by demonstrations through which students learn some of the fundamental tools of this highly empirical science. In addition, each student gains detailed knowledge of an area of active research related to organic chemistry. After selecting a topic of interest, each student prepares a paper and a class seminar, using current scientific literature. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours per week of homework. Prerequisite: Completion of either CHEM-550 with a 5 or above each term or CHEM-580 with a yearlong grade of 5 or above.

Chinese

CHIN-100, First-Level Chinese
Five class periods. This course is designed for those students who have had little or no previous world language experience. It provides an introduction to spoken and written Chinese, with an emphasis on pronunciation, the Pinyin Romanization system, and the building blocks (radicals) of Chinese characters.

CHIN-110, First-Level Chinese
Five class periods. This course is designed for those students who have had previous experience in Chinese, but who are not sufficiently prepared for the second-level course. It provides a review of the Pinyin Romanization system and the building blocks (radicals) of Chinese characters, and emphasizes tonal accuracy.

CHIN-110/5, First-Level Chinese
(A two-term commitment) Five class periods. This course, a continuation of CHIN-100 and CHIN-110 First-Level Chinese, prepares students for CHIN-200 the following year.

CHIN-120/5, Accelerated Chinese Sequence Accelerated First-Level Chinese
Five class periods. Students will be recommended by the teacher for this accelerated course at the end of the fall trimester of CHIN-100 or CHIN-110. This course moves at a fast pace and expects students to do much independent learning outside of class. Successful completion of CHIN-120 allows students to advance to CHIN-220. The CHIN-100, -110, -220, and -320 sequence covers three years of Chinese in two years.

CHIN-200/0, Second-Level Chinese
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. This course continues to emphasize proficiency in everyday situations. Students enlarge their inventory of words and phrases while also developing a deeper understanding of the essential features of Chinese grammar. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-110/5.

CHIN-220, Accelerate Chinese Sequence
Five class periods. CHIN-220 follows CHIN-120 and precedes CHIN-320 as part of an accelerated sequence. Because of the fast pace, each student's progress will be closely monitored during the fall term to see whether it is in his or her best interest to rejoin CHIN-200 for the remainder of the year or to continue the accelerated sequence in CHIN-320 in the winter and spring. The course focuses on building oral and written proficiency on daily topics with student-centered activities. Texts, supplementary readings, audio and video materials are used to provide a rich and complete learning experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chinese 120.

CHIN-300/0, Third-Level Chinese
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. This course provides more emphasis on reading and writing. Students are introduced to longer texts, covering such topics as family life, social issues, and aspects of Chinese culture. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-200.

CHIN-320/5, Accelerated Chinese Sequence
Five class periods. This third level course follows CHIN-220 and continues the accelerated sequence of three-years-in-two started in CHIN-120. The course moves at a fast pace and expects students to do thorough preparation and review independently outside of class. Much of the class time is devoted to oral proficiency development on concrete topics that are related to high school student lives and their perspectives. All students are expected to participate actively in class at the individual, small group and whole class level. Written proficiency is equally important for this course. Students are expected to practice and improve writing through various tasks, including essay and other types of written assignments. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.

CHIN-400/0, Fourth-Level Chinese
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. Increased use of authentic materials is employed as more sophisticated aspects of language and culture are explored. In particular, students are exposed to the more formal written style of Chinese, which is prevalent in newspapers, on street signs, etc. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of CHIN-300 or equivalent.

CHIN-420/0, Accelerated Chinese Sequence
Four class periods. The course is designed for intermediate learners who have acquired basic Chinese cultural knowledge and felt comfortable engaging in further exploration on this topic. In addition to the continued language acquisition through listening, speaking, reading and writing, students will also get familiar with Chinese literature, history and current events. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-320 or equivalent.

CHIN-500/0, Fifth-Level Chinese
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. This course is designed for learners who would like to continue their advanced Chinese learning regardless of the advanced placement exam. Students will read contemporary articles to further explore the formal style of the written language, improve their oral proficiency by producing longer narrative in a well-organized and logical discourse. Oral presentations, written essays, journals, papers are typically assessment in the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-400 or equivalent.

CHIN-520/0, Advanced Placement Chinese
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. This intensive course is designed in accordance with the College Board guidelines to prepare students for the AP exam in Chinese. Students refine their communicative abilities in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes while deepening their understanding of Chinese history and contemporary society. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-420 or permission of the department chair.

CHIN-620/1, Advanced Topics in Chinese
Four class periods. This advanced course explores a wide range of modern issues in China within a historical, political, and cultural framework. In addition to assigned readings and class discussions, students also are expected to conduct independent research (using a variety of media), present oral reports, and submit papers on a regular basis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-500 or -520, or permission of the department chair.

CHIN-620/2, Advanced Topics in Chinese
Four class periods. This advanced course explores a wide range of modern issues in China within a historical, political, and cultural framework. In addition to assigned readings and class discussions, students also are expected to conduct independent research (using a variety of media), present oral reports, and submit papers on a regular basis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-500 or -520, or permission of department chair.

CHIN-620/3, Advanced Topics in Chinese
Four class periods. This advanced course explores a wide range of modern issues in China within a historical, political, and cultural framework. In addition to assigned readings and class discussions, students also are expected to conduct independent research (using a variety of media), present oral reports, and submit papers on a regular basis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-500 or -520 or permission, of the department chair.

CHIN-641/2, Topics in 20th-Century China for Advanced Heritage Learners
Four class periods. This course is intended for students with near-native fluency in Chinese and extensive familiarity with Chinese culture. A variety of recent cultural and historical topics are studied, and the course structure and content are designed to emulate the challenge of an actual high school-level language course taught in China. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-640 or CHIN-642, or permission of the department.

CHIN-642/1, Chinese Current Events for Advanced Heritage Learners
Four class periods. Students keep learning complex sentence structures and improving fluency and accuracy in both colloquial and written formats. Course materials include reading excerpts, newspaper articles, TV programs and movies that reflect the major current events in contemporary China. Through reading, listening, writing and discussing the course materials, students will gain a deeper understanding of various aspects of Chinese people and society, while fine tuning their language with enlarged vocabulary and complex sentence patterns both in spoken and written forms. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-640 or CHIN-641, or permission of the department.

CHIN-642/2, Chinese Current Events for Advanced Heritage Learners
Four class periods. Students keep learning complex sentence structures and improving fluency and accuracy in both colloquial and written formats. Course materials include reading excerpts, newspaper articles, TV programs and movies that reflect the major current events in contemporary China. Through reading, listening, writing and discussing the course materials, students will gain a deeper understanding of various aspects of Chinese people and society, while fine tuning their language with enlarged vocabulary and complex sentence patterns both in spoken and written forms. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-640 or CHIN-641, or permission of the department.

CHIN-642/3, Chinese Current Events for Advanced Heritage Learners
Four class periods. Students keep learning complex sentence structures and improving fluency and accuracy in both colloquial and written formats. Course materials include reading excerpts, newspaper articles, TV programs and movies that reflect the major current events in contemporary China. Through reading, listening, writing and discussing the course materials, students will gain a deeper understanding of various aspects of Chinese people and society, while fine tuning their language with enlarged vocabulary and complex sentence patterns both in spoken and written forms. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHIN-640 or CHIN-641, or permission of the department.

Classical Languages

CLAS-310, Etymology
Four class periods. Open to all classes. English has an immense vocabulary (far larger than that of any other language), over half of which is based on Latin and Greek roots. The words of this Greco-Roman inheritance are best understood not simply as stones in the vast wall of English, but rather as living organisms with a head, body, and feet (prefix, main root, and suffix), creatures with grandparents, siblings, cousins, foreign relatives, life histories, and personalities of their own; some work for doctors and lawyers, others for columnists, crusaders, and captains of commerce. Systematic study of a few hundred roots opens the door to understanding the meanings and connotations of tens of thousands of words in English, the language now rapidly emerging as the most adaptable for international and intercultural communication.

CLAS-400/0, Greek
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. This course is open to students who have completed Latin 300. Students without a background in Latin should enroll in GREK-150. The course introduces the student directly to the classical Greek of Periclean Athens through a series of readings that present not only the vocabulary, forms, and syntax of the language, but also the thoughts, feelings, and actions that characterize Greek culture. Prerequisite: LATN-300 or permission of the department.

CLAS-500/0, Greek
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. The course continues the format of CLAS-400, with further systematic development of reading skills and control of vocabulary, forms, and syntax through the medium of more advanced selections from the Greek masterpieces, always with the purpose of understanding the spirit of the people who produced them. Prerequisite: CLAS-400/0

Computer Science

COMP-350, Programming Fundamentals: From Scratch To Python
Five class periods. The course begins with Scratch, a programming language that makes it easy to create interactive stories, games, and art. Students will learn about variables, conditional statements (if-else), iterations (loops), and design and implement their programming projects in Scratch's drag-and-drop environment. After Scratch, the course moves on to Python, a more sophisticated programming language. Using Python packages TurtleGraphics and VPython, students will create attractive designs in two- and three-dimensional space. Throughout the course, we will discuss the challenges and the opportunities related to the explosion of computer use in the modern world. Prerequisite: None

COMP-450, Languages of the Web
Five class periods. The proliferation of websites and demand for increasingly complex content has led to an explosion of programming solutions for developing web pages. This course introduces students to programming in Javascript, one of the more popular options for dynamic websites. Along the way students explore the powerful features built in the latest versions of the HTML language and associated style sheets, as well as the tools needed for deploying and managing their own websites. Prerequisite: None

COMP-470, Introduction to Discrete Mathematics and Programming
Five class periods. This course blends a study of programming (using the Python programming language) with mathematics relevant to computer science. Students learn how to design simple algorithms and write and test short programs in Python. The course covers Python syntax and style, as well as data types, conditional statements, iterations (loops), and recursion. Selected mathematical topics include sets, number systems, Boolean algebra, counting, and probability. A student in this course is eligible for credit in either mathematics or computer science. A student who wishes to receive mathematics credit should sign up for MATH-470; a student who wishes to receive computer science credit should sign up for COMP-470. Prerequisite: MATH-330 or permission of the department.

COMP-500, Advanced Placement Computer Science I
Five class periods. The first term of a yearlong course in algorithms, object-oriented programming, and data structures, guided by the College Board's AP Computer Science course description. The course covers Java language syntax and style, classes and interfaces, conditional and iterative statements, strings and arrays. Prerequisite: Math 340 or permission of the department.

COMP-500/5, AP Computer Science II
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. This course is the continuation of Comp 500. The emphasis is on Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), searching and sorting algorithms, recursion, data structures, and the design and implementation of larger programs, including the College Board's required case study and team projects. This course completes the preparation for the Advanced Placement examination in computer science. Prerequisite: COMP-500.

COMP-630/2, Honors Computer Science Seminar
Four class periods. This class offers students with experience and advanced knowledge of computer science the opportunity to explore specific topics beyond the College Boards's AP curriculum. Topics will vary from year-to-year and may include data structures, advanced web page design, or graphical user interface design. This course may require more than the standard four or five hours per week of homework. Prerequisite: A grade of at least 5 in COMP-500, or permission of the department chair.

English

ENGL-100/0, An Introduction
ENGL-100 provides an introduction to the study of language and literature at Andover. In this junior course, which cultivates the same skills and effects pursued throughout the English curriculum, students begin to understand the rich relationships among reading, thinking, and writing. ENGL-100 assents to Helen Vendler's notion that "every good writer was a good reader first." Accordingly, ENGL-100 students work to develop their ability to read closely, actively, and imaginatively. They study not only what a text means but also how it produces meaning. They seek to make connections as they read - perhaps at first only connections between themselves and the text, but eventually connections within the text and between the texts as well. All the while, however, ENGL-100 students revel in the beauty, humor, and wisdom of the literature. Over the three trimesters, ENGL-100 students read literature of various genres and periods. For their syllabi, teachers turn to a great many authors. ENGL-100 students practice several types of writing, primarily in response to what they read. They write at times in narrative, expressive, and creative modes, but their efforts focus more and more on critical analysis. They learn to conceive of writing as a craft to be practiced and as a process to be followed. Through frequent assignments, both formal and informal, ENGL-100 students come to value writing as a means of making sense of what they read and think. Attending carefully to their writing at the levels of the sentence, paragraph, and full essay, they learn to appreciate the power of the written critical argument. Although their work is substantially assessed throughout the year, ENGL-100 students do not receive grades during the fall trimester. At the end of the term, their report cards will indicate "Pass" or "Failure." Lively, purposeful class discussions reinforce the lessons of reading and writing and often leave students with especially fond memories of their ENGL-100 experience. The course prepares our youngest students well for the further challenges of their education at Andover.

ENGL-200/0, Writing to Read, Reading to Write
Fall term - During the fall term of ENGL-200, classes focus on the writing process. Students are exposed to a variety of rhetorical modes, such as narration, description, analysis, comparison/contrast, cause/effect, definition, example/illustration, process, and argument. By the end of the term, students should be able to organize, develop, and write cogent essays in five or six of these modes. Teachers integrate a variety of reading assignments into their lessons on the writing process. During the fall term, classes also work deliberately on vocabulary development, clarity, grammar, mechanics, and punctuation. Winter term - In the winter term, the focus shifts to reading and writing about poetry. While the course introduces literary terms and strategies for understanding poetry and fiction, the literature serves primarily as an opportunity for the students to work on writing skills, drawing on the lessons of the fall term and reinforcing argument and persuasion as patterns of thought that can guide the writer logically through a discussion of a poem or short story. Spring term - In the spring term, the focus shifts again to reading and writing about fiction, including the novel. Students continue to write in the modes introduced in the fall term and focus on organizing the essay. The spring term includes a project involving one of the texts.

ENGL-300/0, The Stories of Literature
A yearlong commitment. Literature tells the stories of people's experiences - their dreams, their desires, their acts, their mistakes. ENGL-300 students read poems, plays, short stories, and novels representing diverse historical periods, locations, and identities. In their writing, students practice formal literary analysis in order to gain greater appreciation for the artistic construction of a text and its cultural resonance.

ENGL-301/0, The Stories of Literature for New Uppers
A yearlong commitment. Tailored to the particular needs of new Uppers, ENGL-301 conforms in spirit and essence to ENGL-300, but with more intensive attention to expository writing.

ENGL-400/1, American Studies for International Students
Desinged for one-year students from abroad who are not yet ready for ENGL-495, this course provides intensive training in reading, literary fundamentals, and expository writing. The focus of this course is on American culture, values, and traditions as reflected in literature and other media. One or two terms of this course will provide students with the reading and writing skills required for success in other senior electives. (Dr. Vidal)

ENGL-400/2, American Studies for International Students
Designed for one-year students from abroad who are not yet ready for ENGL-520, this course provides intensive training in reading, literary fundamentals, and expository writing. The focus of this course is on American culture, values, and traditions as reflected in literature and other media. One or two terms of this course will provide students with the reading and writing skills required for success in other senior electives. (Dr. Vidal)

ENGL-495, Strangers in a Strange Land
This course for one-year students explores how strangers adapt to new places and new modes of being. Does one reinvent oneself, conquer the new, or seamlessly assimilate? Works to be considered might include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Shakespeare's The Tempest, Graham Greene's Our Man in Havana, and poetry by Yosef Komunyakaa, Elizabeth Bishop, and Carolyn Forche. The emphasis will be on close reading and textual analysis. (Ms. Chase)

ENGL-501AA/2, Creative Nonfiction
Contemporary nonfiction author Terry Tempest Williams once said, "I write to discover. I write to uncover." In this course, we will consider the ways that creative nonfiction bridges the gaps between discovering and uncovering, between looking forward and looking back, between imagination and fact, and between invention and memory. This workshop-centered writing course is open to all students seeking to improve their craft and interested in the boundaries and possibilities that creative nonfiction, as a quickly growing genre, continues to explore. Students will develop their talents in the art of essay writing by working in a number of rhetorical modes, including the personal essay, the analytical essay, the lyric essay, the review, and the profile. Readings will include selected models from an anthology of contemporary work. (Ms. McQuade)

ENGL-501AB, Writing Through the Universe of Discourse
This course invites students to experiment in different genres of writing, including poetry, essay, short fiction, memoir, literary critique, letters, etc. The course serves all kinds of students, but particularly those who would like to gain confidence in their writing skills. Readings and discussions will consider issues of social justice as well as literary analysis. The course also provides methods and theories for students interested in teaching and community service. Students in the class may volunteer to join a weekly Andover Bread Loaf writing workshop for primary school students in Lawrence, MA. This service project is not required. Readings include texts from a variety of cultures. Authors include Malcolm X, Martin Espada, Julia Alvarez, William Shakespeare, Sylvia Plath, Emily Dickinson, Piri Thomas, Raymond Carver, Franz Kafka, Leo Tolstoi, Stephen Biko, Louise Erdrich, Nikki Giovanni, Sandra Cisneros, Don DeLillo, William Blake, Amy Tan, Sherman Alexie, Rita Dove, James Baldwin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Jimmy Santiago Smith, and Maya Angelou. (Mr. Bernieri)

ENGL-505AA, Creative Writing: Poetry
This course is for students committed to reading and writing poetry. Students will be asked to write about poetry in addition to composing their own poetry. Although students are not expected to submit portfolios or samples of their work to qualify for this class, they must be serious about writing poetry. Previous experience helps, but it is not necessary. (Mr. Yoon)

ENGL-505AB, Creative Writing: Fiction
This course is for students committed to reading and writing short fiction. Students will be asked to write about short fiction in addition to composing their own short fiction. Although students are not expected to submit portfolios or samples of their work to qualify for this class, they must be serious about writing fiction. Previous experience helps, but it is not necessary. (Mr. Yoon)

ENGL-506AA, Fresh Fiction: Advanced Writing Workshop in Contemporary Storytelling
This course is open to students who have completed a creative writing course successfully or who have an abiding enthusiasm for composing fiction. Inspired by the freshest voices in fiction and screen writing today, this workshop allows writers to explore the artistic and thematic frontiers of contemporary storytelling. Over the course of the term students will work to create their own collections of stories or a novella. Gutsy stories, original characters, and vigorous editing/rewriting are our aims. Companion readings from writers like Zadie Smith, Chang Rae Lee, Sandra Cisneros, Khaled Hosseini, Nathan Singer, Bobbie Ann Mason, the Coen Brothers, and Jim Jamusch will offer inspiration. (Mr. Peffer)

ENGL-507AA, Play Writing
Each student is expected to write at least one one-act play in addition to certain exercises in monologue, dialogue, and scene-setting. The class reads aloud from students' works in progress, while studying the formal elements in plays by important playwrights and reading selected literary criticism foccused on drama. Note that Play Writing is an English department offering and does not fulfill the Theatre and Dance requirement. (Mr. Heelan)

ENGL-510AA, Gothic Literature: Living in the Tomb
The course traces trends in Gothic forms, from its origins of the damp and dark castles of Europe to the aridity of the contemporary American landscape. Students will identify gothic conventions and themes such as the haunted house, family dynamics, apparitions, entrapment, secrecy, and the sublime. We will read novels, short stories, and poetry spanning roughly 200 years in order to explore questions about the supernatural, the psychology of horror and terror, the significance of fantasy and fear, the desire for moral closure, and the roles of gender, race, class, and sexuality. Probable selections include The Castle of Otranto, by Horace Walpole; Faustus, by Christopher Marlowe; Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier; Dracula, by Bram Stoker; The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James; stories by Poe, Faulkner, Gaskell, Irving, Hawthorne, Gilman, Jackson, Cheever, DeLillo, Carver, and Oates; and poetry of Christina Rossetti, Thomas Gray, William Cowper, Louise Gluck, and Sylvia Plath. Possible films include Affliction, The Royal Tenenbaums, A Simple Plan, Psycho, and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. (Mr. Tortorella)

ENGL-510AB, Theories of Children's Literature
This course considers the role of the imagination in communicating and effecting cultural change. Students will be asked to apply a variety of critical theory for interpretation and discussion of the literature. Themes this course will explore include alternative realities, the nature of dreams, the function of the subconscious, and the use of allegory. Probable selections include The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, by Lewis Carroll; Haroun and the Sea of Stories, by Salman Rushdie; The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame; The Jungle Book, by Rudyard Kipling; The Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum; The Pied Piper of Hamelin, by Robert Browning; The Secret Garden, by Frances Hodgson Burnett; A Child's Garden of Verses, by Robert Louis Stevenson; The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and The Last Battle, by C.S. Lewis; and Grimm's Fairy Tales, Mother Goose, writings of Carlos Castaneda, and essays by Bettelheim and Zipes. Possible films include The Red Balloon and The Point. (Mr. Tortorella)

ENGL-511AB/2, Media Studies
What does it mean to be fully literate in the information age? Working from the premise that all messages are constructed, we will examine the forces (explicit and hidden) that determine those constructions, as well as the ways in which our daily and multiple interactions with various media determine our sense of self, identity, truth, and desire. Students will read a range of media studies theory and then put those theories into practice by examining the language, images, narratives, and truth we encounter in traditional or alternative news sources, advertising, television, politics, sports, and other cultural institutions. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to write several pages every week. The winter term will focus on the production and consumption of media, asking questions about the interests that own, produce, control, and sell the news, the blurry line between news and entertainment, the conventions of advertising, the rise of media conglomerates in the 1990s, and the emergence of convergence culture in the last decade. The spring term will focus on questions of narrative, character, and identity as they shape and are shaped by conventions and transgressions of gender; by the literary modes of tragedy, comedy, and romance; by fads and trends; by technology and history; by heroism and nostalgia. (Ms. Tousignant)

ENGL-511AB/3, Media Studies Looking Glass
What does it mean to be fully literate in the information age? Working from the premise that all messages are constructed, we will examine the forces (explicit and hidden) that determine those constructions, as well as the ways in which our daily and multiple interactions with various media determine our sense of self, identity, truth, and desire. Students will read a range of media studies theory and then put those theories into practice by examining the language, images, narratives, and truth we encounter in traditional or alternative news sources, advertising, television, politics, sports, and other cultural institutions. This is a writing-intensive course, and students will be expected to write several pages every week. The winter term will focus on the production and consumption of media, asking questions about the interests that own, produce, control, and sell the news, the blurry line between news and entertainment, the conventions of advertising, the rise of media conglomerates in the 1990s, and the emergence of convergence culture in the last decade. The spring term will focus on questions of narrative, character, and identity as they shape and are shaped by conventions and transgressions of gender; by the literary modes of tragedy, comedy, and romance; by fads and trends; by technology and history; by heroism and nostalgia. (Ms. Tousignant)

ENGL-511BB, This Is America: The Wire
"The grand theme here is nothing less than a national existentialism," David Simon wrote in proposing The Wire to HBO. Seven years and sixty television hours later, he had thoroughly explored the interconnectedness of race, class, social policy, and ethics in modern-day America, and he had done so in a manner comparable to Dickens. In this course, students will approach The Wire in varied ways: as a work of television, as a work of literature, as a work critiquing social policy, as a work exploring urban life, as a work examining America. Topics will range from heroic archetypes to housing policy, from the failures of the post-industrial economy to the failures of contemporary school reform, from narrative methodologies to urban inequality. By focusing on these topics and others, students will recognize the complexity of key challenges facing America; in Detective Lester Freamon's words from the first season, "All the pieces matter." To inhale The Wire in its entirety, students must devote three hours to attending class, at least seven hours to screening episodes, and at least four hours to reading each week throughout the term. Readings may include selections from, among others: Leslie Fiedler, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Paolo Freire, Karl Marx, Arthur Miller, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and William Julius Wilson. (Mr. Fox)

ENGL-511CC, The World in Pieces: Cinema, Poetry, And the Aesthetics of Fragmentation
In this interdisciplinary course, we explore the dynamism of modernist and avant-garde poetry and cinema, the aesthetics of collage and montage, quotation and pastiche. We devote the first half of the term to drawing into conversation experiments in poetic and cinematic language to describe and shape the modern world by reading the poetry of Blaise Cendrars, Mina Loy, E. E. Cummings, and the Surrealists, and screening early avant-garde films by Fernand Léger, Man Ray, Joseph Cornell, and others. During the second half of the term, we concentrate on post-WWII, American avant-garde cinema, focusing in particular on the work of Maya Deren, Kenneth Anger, Stan Brakhage, and Lawrence Jordan. (Mr. Bird)

ENGL-511RO, English Romantic Poetry
In the preface to the second edition of Lyrical Ballads, William Wordsworth claims that "all good Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings" produced by authors who "had also thought long and deeply." For Wordsworth and other poets retroactively labeled "Romantic," the tension between spontaneity and deliberation led to an exploration and interrogation of what constitutes "good Poetry" in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century England. In this course, we will examine how the Romantics?especially Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats?defined and contextualized their art. In doing so, we will consider how and why these writers are grouped together as Romantic poets. Other authors may include William Blake, Robert Burns, Lord Byron, Thomas Chatterton, John Clare, Mary Robinson, Walter Scott, Robert Southey, and Dorothy Wordsworth. (Rielly) (Mr. Rielly)

ENGL-512AA/1, Great Traditions in Literature: The Epic Poem
This course studies the development of the epic poem through Classical, Medieval, and Early Modern contexts. Texts: The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, Metamorphoses, and Moby Dick (even years); Paradise Lost and The Inferno (odd years). (Mr. McGraw)

ENGL-512AA/2, Great Traditions in Literature: The Epic Poem
This course studies the development of the epic poem through Classical, Medieval, and Early Modern contexts. Texts: The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, Metamorphoses, and Moby Dick (even years); Paradise Lost and The Inferno (odd years). (Mr. McGraw)

ENGL-512AA/3, Great Traditions in Literature: The Epic Poem
This course studies the development of the epic poem through Classical, Medieval, and Early Modern contexts. Texts: The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, Metamorphoses, and Moby Dick (even years); Paradise Lost and The Inferno (odd years). (Mr. McGraw)

ENGL-513AA/1, The Short Novel: Risk & Romance
This course uses a mix of seminar classes, films, and regular, individual student-teacher conferences to examine experimental short novels from around the world. Students learn to draw conclusions about the artistic and social forces that gave rise to these novels. Each term draws comparisons among works by Vonnegut, Mann, Joyce, Walker, Puig, Rulfo, Enchi, Duras, Achebe, Hemingway, McCullers, Camus, Salinger, Garcia, and others. (Mr. Peffer)

ENGL-513AA/2, The Short Novel: Risk & Romance
This course uses a mix of seminar classes, films, and regular, individual student-teacher conferences to examine experimental short novels from around the world. Students learn to draw conclusions about the artistic and social forces that gave rise to these novels. Each term draws comparisons among works by Vonnegut, Mann, Joyce, Walker, Puig, Rulfo, Enchi, Duras, Achebe, Hemingway, McCullers, Camus, Salinger, Garcia, and others. (Mr. Peffer)

ENGL-514AA/1, Journalism
This course on print journalism recognizes the challenges all journalists face in their efforts to be fair and also accurate as they struggle to gather information and churn out lively copy under deadline pressure. The course is designed to teach essential journalistic judgment, skills for gathering and verifying news, and interviewing and writing techniques. Students will receive weekly assignments on deadline for news articles, feature stories, and opinion pieces, and will supplement this skills work with readings on the First Amendment, media ethics, and the law. We will also discuss the current radical transformation of newspapers in the digital age. Texts for the course are Journalism 101, by Nina Scott, and excepts from The Elements of Journalism, by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel, as well as daily newspapers. Films will include Absence of Malice, All the President's Men, The Year of Living Dangerously, and Welcome to Sarajevo. (Ms. Greenberg)

ENGL-516AA/3, Contemporary American Poetry
This course will introduce students to poets and movements that have shaped the direction and contours of American poetry since World War II. We start with a study of the Beat Movement, and then explore the so-called "schools" of poetry -Black Mountain, New York, Confessional, et al. The course finishes with an exposure to poetry that is happening right now, which includes bicultural and multicultural poets. Most class time will be spent deriving themes through discussions of poets, poems, poetic movements, criticism, and theory. Poets include Ginsberg, Corso, Kerouac, Dylan, Waldman, Bukowski, Creeley, Olson, Levertov, Ashbury, O'Hara, Lowell, Plath, Berryman, Bishop, Rich, Dove, Hass, Kinnell, Hogan, Nye, Springsteen, and Colvin. (Mr. Tortorella)

ENGL-518AA, The Literature of Travel Writing
The British scholar Paul Fussell writes, "Successful travel writing mediates between two poles: the individual thing it describes, on the one hand, and the larger theme that it is 'about,' on the other. A travel book will make the reader aware of a lot of things - ships, planes, trains, donkeys, sore feet, hotels, bizarre customs and odd people, unfamiliar weather, curious architecture, and risky food. At the same time, a travel book will reach in the opposite direction and deal with these data so as to suggest that they are not wholly inert and discrete but are elements of a much larger meaning, a meaning metaphysical, political, psychological, artistic, or religious - but always, somehow, ethical." In the course, students will read excerpts from travel literature over time and write three travel essays of their own. Writers may include Marco Polo, Christopher Columbus, Lady Mary Wortley Montague, Apsley Cherry-Garrard, Charles Darwin, Freya Stark, D.H. Lawrence, Jack Kerouac, V.S. Naipaul, Paul Theroux, Margaret Atwood, Annie Dillard, and David Foster Wallace. (Ms. Scott)

ENGL-519AA/2, 20th Century Drama
This course will be devoted to the major dramatists and theatrical movements of the 20th Century. Each term students will read plays from specific regions of the world in an attempt to locate the playwriting from that region within the world of dramatic literature, as well as come to grips with the issues with which the playwrights are dealing, and the cultures from which their work is erupting. Approaching the plays through historical, cultural and political contexts, students will analyze how the best playwrights pose and dramatize important questions of the time, while revolutionizing conventional dramatic practice through the developments in Naturalism, Realism and Symbolism (and various combinations of these). WINTER Term - European Drama. Playwrights studied may include: Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Brecht, Pinter, Stoppard, Pirandello, Beckett, and Shaw.

ENGL-519AA/3, 20th Century Drama
This course will be devoted to the major dramatists and theatrical movements of the 20th Century. Each term students will read plays from specific regions of the world in an attempt to locate the playwriting from that region within the world of dramatic literature, as well as come to grips with the issues with which the playwrights are dealing, and the cultures from which their work is erupting. Approaching the plays through historical, cultural and political contexts, students will analyze how the best playwrights pose and dramatize important questions of the time, while revolutionizing conventional dramatic practice through the developments in Naturalism, Realism and Symbolism (and various combinations of these). SPRING Term - American Drama. Playwrights studied may include O'Neill, Miller, Wilson, Albee, Norman, Wasserstein, Shepard, Kushner, Parks, Hwang, Mamet.(Ms. Chase)

ENGL-520AA, Gender Roles in Contemporary World Fiction
Love, family, and passion have always been popular literary themes in a variety of cultures. However, there are different ways in which each culture approaches these subjects, especially as they relate to gender roles and the relationships between men and women (as well as men and men and women and women). In this course, we will go on a "trip around the world," examining gender in a variety of contemporary cultural settings and comparing the fictional works that we will study to what we experience on a daily basis in American society. From traditional romantic obsession and rigid sex roles to challenges of these traditional roles and expectations, our texts will provide a variety of issues and perspectives to frame our discussions. Readings include: Machado de Assis, Dom Casmurro (Brazil); Rifaat, A Distant View of a Minaret (Egypt); Puig, Kiss of the Spider Woman (Argentina); Dangarembga, Nervous Conditions (Zimbabwe); Ensler, Necessary Targets (Bosnia). Films: The Crying Game, Thelma & Louise, The Adventures of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert, Strangers in Good Company, Angels in America, and excerpts from episodes of "Sex and the City." (Dr. Vidal)

ENGL-520AB, Children in Literature: Growing Up in A Changing World
What does it mean to be a child? What defines a "good" or "bad" kid? Is there a certain age or type of behavior that separates children from adults? When and how do we "grow up?" Are our expectations for boys and girls different? Should they be? This course will explore how our conceptualization of childhood has changed over time by looking at a variety of sources: philosophical and psychological texts about children and representations of children in literature and film for adults, as well as some works aimed at young readers. We will focus on the emergence of self within contexts of family and community, exploring the processes of identity formation in both Western and non-Western narratives. We will pay particular attention to an analysis of gender roles and of education within these stories, pondering the ways in which different societies and their values become perpetuated through their fictional children. (Dr. Vidal)

ENGL-521BB, Under the Fur: Animals in Literature
According to thinker Gilles Deleuze, anyone who likes cats or dogs is a fool. But we live in a time when more than one cable television channel is entirely dedicated to animal programming and whole weeks are given to sharks. It seems we are not concerned about becoming fools for species not our own. Since interest in and regard for nonhuman animals certainly was not invented by media outlets, this course aims to track literary animals across time, place, and genre. We will begin in Antiquity with human-animal metamorphoses, follow manticores and birds into the Middle Ages, witness a feline subculture in the Early Modern period, and pursue dolphins, apes, elephants, and dogs into modernity. This course explores both how animals and animal lives are represented in literature and how the presence of animals allows us to understand in new ways how literary texts function. Our readings may include excerpts from Ovid's Metamorphoses and medieval bestiaries, The Owl & the Nightingale, William Baldwin's Beware the Cat, Aryn Kyle's The God of Animals, Mark Doty's Dog Years, and Amitav Ghosh's The Hungry Tide. Supplementing our investigations into the animal as a literary figure, we will also watch a handful of films and read selections from the work of contemporary theorists who consider what it means to meet, eat, look at, speak to, and be looked at by animals. (Dr. Har)

ENGL-523AA, Modern American Literature - Rosebud: The Restless Search for an American Identity
Many of our enduring American works of literature and film, such as The Great Gatsby, The Catcher in the Rye, and Citizen Kane, center on the search for self. Through discussions on class, race, and gender, this course will present a series of American portraits while examining our changing society. Students will write personal narratives, as well as critical essays. Possible texts: Continental Drift, Banks; The Awakening, Chopin; Fences, Wilson; Six Degrees of Separation, Guare. Possible films: Citizen Kane; Far From Heaven; Tully; Transamerica; Hustle & Flow. (Mr. Bardo)

ENGL-523BB, African Identities in American Literature
The course will engage students in exploring African identities in American literature, and vice versa. Through the study of select texts, students will examine the perceptions that drive the forming of these identities, and how close or distant they are from reality. Of particular interest to course participants will be how these perceptions have evolved since the middle of the 20th Century. Students will also study the influence these perceptions have had on the portrayal of Africans in American media, and Americans in African media. Through an examination of select films, participants will study how movie directors have interpreted these perceptions and to what effect. Classes will be organized around discussions based on the Socratic and other methods that require total student engagement. Regular essay writing will be punctuated by weekly blog postings and bi-weekly oral presentations. The texts will include: AMERICAN: Dreams from My Father by Barack Obama, A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, Middle Passage by Charles Johnson and The House at Sugar Beach by Helene Cooper; AFRICAN: A Man of the People by Chinua Achebe, The Dilemma of a Ghost by Ama Ata Aidoo and The Thing Around Your Neck by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie; FILMS: Coming to America, Blood Diamond; Invictus, Cry Freetown, The Constant Gardener; Hotel Rwanda and Sarafina. (Mr. Nyamwaya)

ENGL-524AA/1, Rememories: Trauma and Survival in Twentieth-Century Literature
In her novel Beloved, Toni Morrison coins the term "rememory" to describe a type of memory that won't stay buried - ghosts of experiences that resurface across years, decades, even centuries, memories of trauma that continue to haunt literature to this day. This course will examine how narratives of trauma and survival have been represented (and re-presented) in twentieth- and twenty-first century literature. In our investigation of literature about war, terrorism, diaspora, and other cultural traumas, we will encounter authors writing from a variety of historical moments and perspectives. We will look closely at how trauma literature both delineates and breaks down divisions within individual, societal, and generational trauma experience. And we will engage with the course texts by writing in a number of modes, both critical and creative. Thematic focuses will include the problematics of truth and testimony; the dismantling of traditional narrative structures and genres; individual vs. collective memory; societal regeneration; and the ways trauma literature engages with issues of race, class, gender, and national identity. (Mrs. McQuade)

ENGL-524AA/3, Rememories: Trauma and Survival in Twentieth-Century Literature
In her novel Beloved, Toni Morrison coins the term "rememory" to describe a type of memory that won't stay buried - ghosts of experiences that resurface across years, decades, even centuries, memories of trauma that continue to haunt literature to this day. This course will examine how narratives of trauma and survival have been represented (and re-presented) in twentieth- and twenty-first century literature. In our investigation of literature about war, terrorism, diaspora, and other cultural traumas, we will encounter authors writing from a variety of historical moments and perspectives. We will look closely at how trauma literature both delineates and breaks down divisions within individual, societal, and generational trauma experience. And we will engage with the course texts by writing in a number of modes, both critical and creative. Thematic focuses will include the problematics of truth and testimony; the dismantling of traditional narrative structures and genres; individual vs. collective memory; societal regeneration; and the ways trauma literature engages with issues of race, class, gender, and national identity. (Mrs. McQuade)

ENGL-524AB, Passing in Literature and Film
What does it mean to "pass" in a certain community? What are the connotations? What are the forces that cause an individual to attempt to pass? Is it always a conscious decision? What does a person gain and what does she or he give up in the process of passing? This course explores the role of "passsing" - when a person assumes another racial, ethnic, gender, sex, or class - in various texts and contexts. In doing so, students will consider how identity is categorized, revealed, and concealed. This course asks students to think critically about how we define identity and consider the roles agency and privlege play in the process of "passing." Texts may include: Chestnut, The House Behind the Cedars; Larsen, Passing and Quicksand; Senna, Caucasia; Wolff, Old School; Roth, The Human Stain. Films may include: Sirk, Imitation of Life; Niccol, Gattica; Demme, Philaadelphia Story; Peirce, Boys Don't Cry; Edwards, Victor Victoria. (Dr. Long)

ENGL-525AA/1, Feasts and Fools: Revelers and Puritans In Literature and Life
This course explores what Jean Toomer called "the good-time spirit" and its opposite, as manifest in major literature, including drama and film. We examine and make use of the literary critical distinction between ingenuousness, innocence, aureation and richness on the one hand and sophistication, irony, exposure and disillusionment on the other (in the words of C. S. Lewis, "golden" vs. "drab"). Correlations proliferate from this basic one: cavalier/puritan, rhapsodic/satirical, innocent/experienced, carpe diem/dulce et decorum est, hedonist/stoic, romantic/neo-classical, Dionysian/Apollonian. Along with critical writing on literature, the students occupy themselves with parties and festivities in their own lives, as well as in other cultures, with the impulse to trust one's appetites, and with the meeting place of that impulse and the cultural practices that define sumptuary limits. Personal essays may lead to anthropological, architectural, performative, and semiological research projects, creative writing, and reports. Texts vary but have included Mrs. Dalloway, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Love in the Time of Cholera, A Year in Provence, The Debt to Pleasure, The Garden of Last Days, Saturday, The Short Stories of John Cheever, Cannery Row, House of Sand and Fog and The Custom of the Country and Dancing in the Streets. Films have included Babette's Feast, Sense and Sensibility, and Chocolat. (Dr. Wilkin)

ENGL-525AA/2, Feasts and Fools: Revelers and Puritans In Literature and Life
This course explores what Jean Toomer called "the good-time spirit" and its opposite, as manifest in major literature, including drama and film. We examine and make use of the literary critical distinction between ingenuousness, innocence, aureation and richness on the one hand and sophistication, irony, exposure and disillusionment on the other (in the words of C. S. Lewis, "golden" vs. "drab"). Correlations proliferate from this basic one: cavalier/puritan, rhapsodic/satirical, innocent/experienced, carpe diem/dulce et decorum est, hedonist/stoic, romantic/neo-classical, Dionysian/Apollonian. Along with critical writing on literature, the students occupy themselves with parties and festivities in their own lives, as well as in other cultures, with the impulse to trust one's appetites, and with the meeting place of that impulse and the cultural practices that define sumptuary limits. Personal essays may lead to anthropological, architectural, performative, and semiological research projects, creative writing, and reports. Texts vary but have included Mrs. Dalloway, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Love in the Time of Cholera, A Year in Provence, The Debt to Pleasure, The Garden of Last Days, Saturday, The Short Stories of John Cheever, Cannery Row, House of Sand and Fog and The Custom of the Country and Dancing in the Streets. Films have included Babette's Feast, Sense and Sensibility, and Chocolat. (Dr. Wilkin)

ENGL-525AA/3, Feasts and Fools: Revelers and Puritans In Literature and Life
This course explores what Jean Toomer called "the good-time spirit" and its opposite, as manifest in major literature, including drama and film. We examine and make use of the literary critical distinction between ingenuousness, innocence, aureation and richness on the one hand and sophistication, irony, exposure and disillusionment on the other (in the words of C. S. Lewis, "golden" vs. "drab"). Correlations proliferate from this basic one: cavalier/puritan, rhapsodic/satirical, innocent/experienced, carpe diem/dulce et decorum est, hedonist/stoic, romantic/neo-classical, Dionysian/Apollonian. Along with critical writing on literature, the students occupy themselves with parties and festivities in their own lives, as well as in other cultures, with the impulse to trust one's appetites, and with the meeting place of that impulse and the cultural practices that define sumptuary limits. Personal essays may lead to anthropological, architectural, performative, and semiological research projects, creative writing, and reports. Texts vary but have included Mrs. Dalloway, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Love in the Time of Cholera, A Year in Provence, The Debt to Pleasure, The Garden of Last Days, Saturday, The Short Stories of John Cheever, Cannery Row, House of Sand and Fog and The Custom of the Country and Dancing in the Streets. Films have included Babette's Feast, Sense and Sensibility, and Chocolat. (Dr. Wilkin)

ENGL-526BB, Arthurian Clatter
King Arthur is at once an ambassador for the Middle Ages, leading us into a world of archaic codes and marvelous events, and a prototype of modernity, representing equality and justice rather than despotism and brute force. We like to think of Arthur and his fellows as our own but we also enjoy the strangeness of the habits and landscapes in these legends. What is it that accounts for this attachment to Camelot and its enduring popularity? In this course, we will investigate this question by exploring the medieval origins of Arthur's story as well as the lasting influence of this story - or better, network of stories - over centuries. We will focus on Arthurian narratives in chronicles and the medieval romance tradition, but will also consider the afterlife of these tales in contemporary novels, television, and film. Our readings may include Chrétien de Troyes' Arthurian Romances, Thomas Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur, Donald Barthelme's The King, and Italo Calvino's The Nonexistent Knight and The Cloven Viscount. Films may include "First Knight," "Excalibur," "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," and "King Arthur." (Dr. Har)

ENGL-527AA/3, The Novel After Modernism
In the middle of the 20th century, writers began to move past both the period and the styles that we still call "modern." What does it mean for a novel to be past modern? Postmodern? Past postmodern? Can a contemporary novel still be a modern novel? In this course we will study the recent progress of the novel genre. We will read aggressively, studying four or five novels. Our authors may include Russell Banks, J.M. Coetzee, Robert Coover, Don DeLillo, Joan Didion, Ralph Ellison, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Cormac McCarthy, Toni Morrison, Haruki Murakami, Vladimir Nabokov, Joyce Carol Oates, Thomas Pynchon, Philip Roth, Jose Saramago, and Zadie Smith. (Mr. Domina)

ENGL-530AA, When I Paint My Masterpiece
This interdisciplinary course is a survey of questions and ideas about art, its nature, its functions, its meanings, and its values. What are the properties of art and of beauty? What about a work makes it look like it looks or reads like it reads? What about a work gives it meaning, and how does it do so? What makes a work good, and how do we justify it as such? What are the consequences of judging some works good and others not, of inclusion and exclusion? Who gets to judge-historically, white men-and how do those judgments establish the norms and values of societies as a whole? Throughout the term, students will apply the writings of various thinkers-from Plato, Immanuel Kant, and Sigmund Freud to Walter Benjamin, E. D. Hirsch, and Adrienne Rich-to both literary and visual works of art. In the former, we will read Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man. In the latter, we will look at works by Diego Velázquez, Andy Warhol, Cindy Sherman, Vincent van Gogh, Gillian Wearing, and Banksy, among many others. (Mr. Fox)

ENGL-530AB, Brazilian Cultural Studies
One credit assigned in either English or Music. Four class periods. See also MUSC-530. Brazil is one of the largest countries in the world, with a diverse population, geography, and cultural makeup. Besides being one of the increasingly powerful BRICS countries, the winner of five soccer World Cups, and the home of the famous Girl from Ipanema, it is also an illustration of how the whole can be greater than the sum of its parts. Its combination of African, European, and native cultures has produced some of the most interesting examples of literature and music in the world. In this course, nineteenth- and twentieth-century Brazil will be studied through the lens of literature, film, art, and music being created at those times. Of special interest will be the literary works of Machado de Assis, Jorge Amado, Clarice Lispector, Carlos Drummond de Andrade, and the participants in the 1922 Week of Modern Art movement, as well as the musical traditions of Europe and Africa that merged in Brazil, producing genres such as chorinho, samba, bossa nova, and tropicalismo. We will also spend some time looking at the current situation in Rio (host of the upcoming finals of the 2014 World Cup and of the 2016 Olympics), especially at how artistic movements promoting social justice and change have been addressing the problems of drug traffic and violence in the favelas. A student in this course is eligible for credit in either English or music. A student who wishes to receive English credit should sign up for ENGL-530AB; a student who wishes to receive music credit should sign up for MUSC-530 (Dr. Vidal and Mr. Cirelli) Prequisite: Successful completion of a music course at the 200 level or above.

ENGL-533GL/2, Abbot Global Scholars: Encounters
One credit assigned in each of English and Philosophy. A multidisciplinary course for seniors that will explore the challenges and opportunities related to globalization and responsible global citizenship in the 21st century. Students will investigate and creatively respond to wealth disparities in local and global contexts and the human rights issues that those disparities represent and engender. We will focus our exploration through the lens of community. How is "community" defined in different contemporary social/cultural contexts? What constitutes a healthy community? What are the conditions that enhance community formation and/or hinder community development? What conditions are required for communities to remain sustainable and vibrant and what conditions function to erode community cohesion, identity, and purpose? What role can individuals play in community formation and development? We will examine these and related questions in dialogue with readings from a variety of genres, films, and guest presentations. Students will shape final projects based on their interests. The course will meet four times during the weekly daily schedule and on Thursday evenings from 5:00-6:30. Students must register for both PHRE-533 and ENGL-533GL/2. (Dr. Moore and Mr. Bardo)

ENGL-535AA/2, James Joyce
Five class periods. The first term is devoted to Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist; the second term to Ulysses. The purposes of the course are to develop the skill to read important and difficult works without the aid of study guides or other secondary material, and to follow the development of Joyce as an artist. Although the course may be taken in either term, the student gains a better sense of Joyce's genius by enrolling for two terms. (Mr. O'Connor)

ENGL-535AA/3, James Joyce
Five class periods. The first term is devoted to Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist; the second term to Ulysses. The purposes of the course are to develop the skill to read important and difficult works without the aid of study guides or other secondary material, and to follow the development of Joyce as an artist. Although the course may be taken in either term, the student gains a better sense of Joyce's genius by enrolling for two terms. (Mr. O'Connor)

ENGL-536AA/1, Shakespeare
Every trimester the English Department offers an elective course in the work of William Shakespeare. Recent course titles include The Play's the Thing, Shakespeare in the Mediterranean, Shakespear's Ecological Thought, and Shakespeare and Revenge.

ENGL-536AA/2, Shakespeare and Revenge
When Thomas Kyd adapted the conventions of Senecan tragedy for the Renaissance stage, he created a new genre - "revenge tragedy" - a genre that William Shakespeare interrogated with such mastery in Hamlet. In this course, we explore Shakespeare's engagement with the theme and stagecraft of revenge, and, particularly, the way in which Shakespeare discovers in the theme of revenge an occasion to trouble the epistemology of theatrical spectacle, of sight and verification, in three plays that span his entire career: Titus Andronicus, Hamlet, and The Tempest. In addition to our three "core" Shakespeare texts, we will read The Spanish Tragedy by Thomas Kyd, as well as selected essays by Michel de Montaigne and Sir Francis Bacon. (Mr. Bird)

ENGL-536AA/3, Shakespeare's Ecocritical Thought(s)
This course borrows its title from scholar Timothy Morton's meditations on ecological thinking which he defines in this way: "The ecological thought is the thinking of interconnectedness...It's a practice and a process of becoming fully aware of how human beings are connected with other beings - animal, vegetable, or mineral." In this seminar, we will build on Mortons ecological thought to consider how encounters with oceans, forests, animals, storms, stones, fires, and landscapes shape several of Shakespeare's plays. In addition to thinking through what Shakespeare's works suggest about the relationship between humans and the physical world, we will attempt to imagine, along with the playwright, nature without the assumption of human dominion as well as nature not as an entity always working against human beings, but as something already inside and around them. By experimenting with ecocentric reading positions, we will attempt to go beyond pointing out natural imagery in Shakespeare's plays and to shed anthropocentric reading models. What does it mean, for example, to experience the world from the bottom of the sea, a place where humans cannot survive? Can reading Shakespeare help us to see the present more clearly? What happens when we take seriously, take literally, a bear attack? To immerse ourselves in these green - and blue, yellow, brown, etc. - worlds, the class will also involve some performing of the plays we cover. (Dr. Har)

ENGL-537AA/1, Writers in Depth
This course will be devoted to one British novelist each term. Each writer is both a representative of a particular time and an innovator who significantly influenced the history of the novel. Fall Term -- Jane Austen. Once taken at her word that her work was very limited, Austen was one of the vital links between the 18th- and 19th-century novelists. As a class, we will read Northanger Abbey, Emma, and Persuasion. Students who have not read Pride and Prejudice will do so, while those who have will read Sense and Sensibility. We will also watch Ang Lee's Sense and Sensibility, as well as selections from adaptations of other Austen novels. (Ms. Fulton)

ENGL-537AA/2, Writers in Depth
This course will be devoted to one British novelist each term. Each writer is both a representative of a particular time and an innovator who significantly influenced the history of the novel. Winter Term: This term we will read Bleak House, which many consider Charles Dickens's masterpiece, an extraordinary blend of comedy, gothic mystery, and social protest, told through an intersecting double narrative. We also will read poetry by Blake and others, as well as study paintings and photographs from the time. (Ms. Fulton)

ENGL-537AA/3, Writers in Depth
This course will be devoted to one British novelist each term. Each writer is both a representative of a particular time and an innovator who significantly influenced the history of the novel. Spring Term: This term will be devoted to Virginia Woolf, who, if she had written no fiction, would still be known for her brilliant essays. We will read her two greatest novels, Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse; several of her short stories and essays; and selections from her autobiographical writings. To put Woolf's work in context, we will view some of the work of the Post-Impressionist painters; read from the war poets (the First World War is central to her novels); and compare her style with that of her fellow Modernist novelists Joyce and Faulkner. (Ms. Fulton)

ENGL-538AA, Edith Wharton
One of America's most gifted literary figures, Wharton created characters at the turn of the last century that we encounter with a shock of recognition today. Her fiction peels back the curtain on the Gilded Age to show us the power of money to seduce, delight, repress, obsess, and destroy men and women at all levels of society. Her elegant prose reverberates with humor, biting satire, and deep psychological insight. We will read the novels The House of Mirth and Summer as well as short stories from the collection Roman Fever and Other Stories and The New York Stories, and we will watch the films The Age of Innocence and The House of Mirth. (Ms. Scott)

ENGL-539AA, Evil, Be Thou My Good: Paradise Lost
In 1667, John Milton - poet, propagandist, theologian, regicide, radical - published a retelling and reimagining of the story of Genesis: Paradise Lost. Through his epic poem, Milton explores the nature of God, evil, and disobedience. How can God know Eve will succumb to temptation while giving her the freedom to do so? If God is good, why does evil exist? When is it just to rebel and best to obey? In this course, we will conduct a close reading of Paradise Lost, a work traditionally admired as the apex of English poetry and one that, perhaps more than any other, absorbs what precedes it and influences what follows it. We will also read relevant passages from the King James Bible as well as both classic and recent scholarship tackling such topics as Milton's style and versification, his character Satan, his depiction of women, and his place in the formation of "the canon" and the notion of "artistic genius," with perhaps specific comparisons to Michelangelo's Sistine ceiling. (Mr. Fox)

ENGL-540AB/3, Atomic America: Service Learning
The spring term of Atomic America is a service-learning course. The first half of the term looks at an atomized America since the 1980s: niche marketing, gated communities, personal technologies, etc. During the latter half of the term, the class will confront this social atomization directly by engaging in service-learning opportunities. In small groups, participants will read about and work with populations that reflect an atomized America. Recently these groups have worked with people with AIDS, the elderly, immigrants, and prisoners. Students then write a final paper that reflects on the literature and their experiences serving and being served by these people. (Dr. Kane)

ENGL-540IN, Post-Colonial India: Salman Rushdie
Using Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children as the core text, this course looks at 20th- and early 21st-century India's history and religion with a focus on literature. With Rushdie's novel as a chronological guide, the course will explore colonial India, the nationalist movement, Independence and Partition, and India's growing industrial and political power. We will also consider Rushdie's novel through the lens of post-colonial theory, its reception in India and abroad, and its considerable literary legacy throughout the formerly British colonial world. (Ms. Curci)

ENGL-541AA, Yeats and the Irish Tradition
Since the establishment of Ireland's independence in 1921, the unique contribution of this nation's literature and culture has gained increasing international recognition. W.B. Yeats, the first of four Irish Nobel laureates and one of the dominant poets of the 20th century, played a key role in the revival of Irish culture. The course will focus not only on Yeats' poetry and drama, but on the great artists who preceded and followed him. Poetry, fiction, and drama, as well as art, music, and film, will be considered as part of this course, including some of the following. Poetry: Selected Poems, W.B. Yeats; Opened Ground, Seamus Heaney; The Water Horse, Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill. Fiction: The Year of the French, Thomas Flanagan; Reading in the Dark, Seamus Deane; Castle Rackrent, Maria Edgeworth. Drama: Selected Plays, W.B. Yeats; The Playboy of the Western World and Riders to the Sea, J.M. Synge; Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett; Translations, Brian Friel. Film: Michael Collins (director, Neil Jordan), The Field (director, Jim Sheridan), Cal (director, Pat O'Connor). (Mr. O'Connor)

ENGL-542AA/1, An Introductory Survey of African- American Literature
"There is really nothing more to say - except why. But since why is difficult to handle, one must take refuge in how." These words, from Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, will guide us through our survey of African American literature as we investigate the "how" - how things happened, how writers have chosen to tell their stories - in order to approach the "why" of both literary interpretation and historical explanation. The fall term focuses on slavery and freedom as we read powerful slave narratives by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, as well as beautiful and devastating 20th-century engagements with the memory and legacy of slavery, by writers like Toni Morrison, Gayl Jones, and Charles Johnson. In the winter term we will read and discuss "coming of age" stories, examining both the unique and the shared challenges faced by the memorable characters of Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Alice Walker. In the spring we will turn to poems, plays, and stories about the importance of "community" in African American literature. Central to our investigations will be an attentiveness to the interplay among race, class, gender, sexuality, historical moment, and geographic location, as well as an appreciation of extraordinary uses of language. Requirements include openness, collegiality, and the courage to take intellectual risks. (Dr. Gardner)

ENGL-542AA/2, An Introductory Survey of African- American Literature
"There is really nothing more to say - except why. But since why is difficult to handle, one must take refuge in how." These words, from Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, will guide us through our survey of African American literature as we investigate the "how" - how things happened, how writers have chosen to tell their stories - in order to approach the "why" of both literary interpretation and historical explanation. The fall term focuses on slavery and freedom as we read powerful slave narratives by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, as well as beautiful and devastating 20th-century engagements with the memory and legacy of slavery, by writers like Toni Morrison, Gayl Jones, and Charles Johnson. In the winter term we will read and discuss "coming of age" stories, examining both the unique and the shared challenges faced by the memorable characters of Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Alice Walker. In the spring we will turn to poems, plays, and stories about the importance of "community" in African American literature. Central to our investigations will be an attentiveness to the interplay among race, class, gender, sexuality, historical moment, and geographic location, as well as an appreciation of extraordinary uses of language. Requirements include openness, collegiality, and the courage to take intellectual risks. (Dr. Gardner)

ENGL-542AA/3, An Introductory Survey of African- American Literature
"There is really nothing more to say - except why. But since why is difficult to handle, one must take refuge in how." These words, from Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, will guide us through our survey of African American literature as we investigate the "how" - how things happened, how writers have chosen to tell their stories - in order to approach the "why" of both literary interpretation and historical explanation. The fall term focuses on slavery and freedom as we read powerful slave narratives by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, as well as beautiful and devastating 20th-century engagements with the memory and legacy of slavery, by writers like Toni Morrison, Gayl Jones, and Charles Johnson. In the winter term we will read and discuss "coming of age" stories, examining both the unique and the shared challenges faced by the memorable characters of Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Alice Walker. In the spring we will turn to poems, plays, and stories about the importance of "community" in African American literature. Central to our investigations will be an attentiveness to the interplay among race, class, gender, sexuality, historical moment, and geographic location, as well as an appreciation of extraordinary uses of language. Requirements include openness, collegiality, and the courage to take intellectual risks. (Dr. Gardner)

ENGL-542CA/2, California Dreaming
In this seminar, students are challenged to take a closer look at the Golden State and explore its varying representations in literature and film. In various texts and contexts students will examine California as a regional frontier with distinct terrains and mythical space. In doing so, students will consider why California is viewed as a place of new beginnings; a place of mystery, adventure; a place of hope and disillusionment. In the winter we will cover works that depict eras from the late1800s through the late 1930s. Texts may include: Muir, The Mountains of California; Austin, The Land of Little Rain; Harte, The Outcasts of Poker Flat; Saroyan, My Name is Aram; McDaniel, The Last Dust Storm; Wakatsuki Houston, Farewell to Manzanar; Steinbeck, Cannery Row; Hammett, The Maltese Falcon; Mori, Yokahama California; Himes, If He Hollers Let Him Go; Fitzgerald, The Love of the Last Tycoon. Films may include: Ford, The Grapes of Wrath; Huston, The Maltese Falcon; Polanski, Chinatown; Wilder, Sunset Boulevard. (Dr. Long)

ENGL-542CA/3, California Dreaming
In this seminar, students are challenged to take a closer look at the Golden State and explore its varying representations in literature and film. In various texts and contexts students will examine California as a regional frontier with distinct terrains and mythical space. In doing so, students will consider why California is viewed as a place of new beginnings; a place of mystery, adventure; a place of hope and disillusionment. In the spring we will cover works that depict eras from the early 1940s through the early l980s. Texts may include: Chandler, The Big Sleep; West, The Day of the Locust; Valdez, Zoot Suit; Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress; Guterson, Snow Falling On Cedars; Ginsberg, Howl; Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem; Tan, The Joy Luck Club. Films may include: Hawks, The Big Sleep; Wilder, Double Indemnity; Franklin, Devil in a Blue Dress; Hanson, L.A. Confidential; Lucas, American Graffiti; Ray, Rebel Without a Cause; Nichols, The Graduate. (Dr. Long)

ENGL-543AB, Haunted by Shadows: Viewing African Independence Through Lens and Literature
This course will offer a brief survey of literature and film about sub-Saharan Africa in the latter part of the 20th century as well as the first decade of the 21st. These works examine the impact of colonialism, corruption, globalization, poverty, tribalism, as well as other forces on nations as they emerge from European domination and strive for independent nationhood. Class discussions will focus on how these authors and film makers craft their works as political and social narratives. Possible texts: GraceLand, Albani; Things Fall Apart, Achebe; Master Harold...and the Boys, Fugard; Everything Good Will Come, Atta; The Madonna of Excelsior, Mda; Disgrace, Coetzee; and Under African Skies: Modern African Stories, Larson. (Mr. Bardo)

ENGL-544BB, Lockdown
Prisons are a growth industry today in the United States. This course, through a blending of literature, film and social sciences, will examine incarceration. By reading novels, memoirs, and poetry, and viewing a few films, we can gain a greater appreciation of the psychological affects of these institutions and the power of art as a means of coping with them (touching then on witnessing and testimonials). We will ask questions about ethics and justice, about self-expression, and about social control. The course will include some experiential learning in the form of a trip to the Essex County Correctional Facility, and to a nearby youth court. Some possible titles may include: Orange is the New Black; Gould's Book of Fish; The Trial; Brothers and Keepers; A Place to Stand; A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich; Zeitoun. (Dr. Kane)

ENGL-546WW, Women's Literature and Society
Virginia Woolf's 1928 lecture, "A Room of One's Own," opens, "But, you may say, we asked you to speak about women and fiction - what has that got to do with a room of one's own?" This course, like her lecture, proceeds from this question. Why, like Woolf, does women's literature need a room of its own? In a way, this course will be that room, where students delve into literature by women that addresses their lives, voices, struggles, and infinite diversity. Is writing literature a form of activism? Through the works examined in this course, students will become well-versed in the "feminist lens" as it sheds light on the intersection of gender, race, class, and sexuality in literature. We will note ways in which prose and poetry authored by women offer personal and political solutions to questions about gender in identity and society. Moreover, we will put women writers in conversation with their presents, their pasts, and their imagined futures. What do all women writers share in common - if anything at all? Lastly, students will use the themes and tools of this course to, in the words of bell hooks, "come closer to feminism," seeking a contemporary definition of the word that might suit a twenty-first century global society still grappling with questions of gender, race, class, and sexuality. Writers include: Octavia Butler, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath, Margery Kempe, Toi Derricotte, Jhumpa Lahiri, Virginia Woolf, Margaret Atwood, bell hooks, Joy Harjo, and Alison Bechdel. (Ms. Staffaroni)

ENGL-547AA/1, Self & Other in Renaissance Literature
"I love an other, and thus hate myself; / I feed me in sorrow, and laugh in all my pain," Sir Thomas Wyatt writes, translating Francis Petrarch's description of the paradoxes of love: "my delight is causer of this strive." In this course, we explore the tensions at play in English Renaissance love poetry, the ways in which the desired "other" of love poetry enables the poets of the 16th Century to claim a unique "poetic self" even as the "other" imperils and destabilizes the integrity of this self. We consider the development of English meter and accentual-syllabic verse, the models for English poetry provided by Antiquity and the Continent, by Petrarchism (and its discontents), and the appeal of genres like the sonnet sequence and epyllion, or "miniature epic," genres which Georgia E. Brown describes as "marginal," exploring metamorphosis, "threshold states and points of coming into being." (Mr. Bird)

French

FREN-100, First-Level French
Five class periods. This course is designed for those students who have had little or no previous world language experience. The course emphasizes the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in the cultural context of the Francophone world. Assignments are regularly required in the Language Learning Center. (Text: Motifs, Jansma/Kassen)

FREN-110, First-Level French
Five class periods. This course is designed for those students who have had previous experience in French, but who are not sufficiently prepared for the second-level course. The course emphasizes listening comprehension and the use of basic conversational patterns of French speech. It includeds elementary grammatical and idiomatic structures, as well as appropriate reading material. Assignments are regularly required in the Language Learning Center. (Text: Motifs, Jansma/Kassen)

FREN-110/5, First-Level French
Five class periods. This course is a continuation of the First-Level French course for students from both FREN-100 and FREN-110 in preparation for French 200 the following year.

FREN-120/5, Accelerated French Sequence
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. Students will be recommended by the teacher for this accelerated course at the conclusion of the first trimester of FREN-100 or FREN-110. Successful completion of FREN-120 allows students to advance to FREN-220. The FREN-100/110-120-220-320 sequence covers three years of French in two years.

FREN-200/0, Second-Level French
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. For students who have completed FREN-110, or for new students who qualify through a placement test. Students practice the IDIOMATIC expressions that are most useful in everyday situations. While continuing to develop aural-oral skills, this course involves reading non-technical French prose and writing simple compositions. (Texts: A votre tour, Valette and Valette; Grammaire progressive du français, CLE.)

FREN-220, Accelerated French Sequence
Five class periods. FREN-220 follows FREN-120 and precedes FREN-320 as part of an accelerated sequence. Because of the rapid pace, each student's progress will be closely monitored during the fall term to see whether it is in his or her best interest to move to FREN-200 for the remainder of the year or to continue the accelerated sequence in FREN-320 in the winter and spring. The course consists of grammar review and acquisition of contemporary vocabulary along with films and varied texts. (Texts: Cinéphile, Conditto; Le Petit Nicolas, Sempé and Goscinny) Prerequisite: FREN-120/5

FREN-300/0, Third-Level French
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. This yearlong course develops listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a review of grammar and the study of French films and Francophone texts. Articles from magazines and newspapers, online resources, and poems and recitations complement this core program. (Text: Cinéphile, Conditto)

FREN-320/5, Accelerated French Sequence
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. Upon successful completion of this course, students continue their study in fourth-year courses. Because of the rapid pace, each student's progress will be evaluated closely in November to determine whether it is in his or her best interest to move to FREN-200. The course content consists of a complete grammar review and acquisition of contemporary vocabulary, along with films and varied texts. (Texts: Cinéphile, Conditto; Le Petit Nicolas, Sempé and Goscinny; Le Comte de Monte Cristo, Dumas)

FREN-400/1, French Civilization
Four class periods. Intended for students who understand, read, and write French well and who already speak at a competent level, but who desire to develop further conversational skills and acquire the vocabulary and idiomatic expression necessary to be able to discuss major cultural and social issues. The course is based on current articles taken directly from the French and Francophone press. The students also read a novel and write a weekly essay. Diction, elocution, and intonation also are stressed through debates and role-playing. (Text: Civilisation progressive du Francaise, CLE; Une Fois POUR Toutes, Sturges, Herbst, Nielsen; M. Ibrahim, Schmitt; Une Tempête, Aimé Césaire.)

FREN-400/2, The Francophone World
Four class periods. Students continue the study of French through a focus on the French-speaking areas outside of France. The course studies the civilizations of North, West and Sub-Saharan Africa and of the Antilles, and includes a study of the geographical, social, and historical aspects of these regions of the world. (Text: Une Fois Pour Toutes, Sturges, Herbst, Nielsen; Une Si Longue Lettre, Mariama Ba; Contes et légendes du monde francophone, Andree Vary et Claire Brouillet.)

FREN-400/3, The Francophone Literature
Four class periods. The central texts during the spring term are Contes et légendes des Antilles, Georgel, and Le Racisme Expliqué a Ma Fille. Ben Jelloun in addition to Une Fois Pour Toutes, Sturges, Herbst, Nielsen.

FREN-420/0, Crossing Cultures
A yearlong commitment. This course includes conversation practice, vocabulary acquisition, grammar exercises, and essay writing in the context of cross-cultural themes in literature and movies. Students consider the question of cultural identity and what it means to have more than one language and more than one culture. Fall term - Camus and Algeria. The class studies what it means to be "the other" in the complex relationship between France and Algeria in Albert Camus's novel L'Etranger and Gillo Pontecorvo's movie La Bataille d'Alger. Winter term - France in World War II. The themes of love and war in Le Silence de la Mer and Hiroshima Mon Amour. Spring term - Belonging to more than one culture. Texts include Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, an autobiographical French graphic novel set in Iran and France, and Camara Laye's L'Enfant noir, a coming of age story set in Guinea. In the context of Tavernier's Autour de Minuit, students also study Paris as a haven for American jazz artists. Prerequisites: Completion of FREN-320 or equivalent.

FREN-520/0, French Civilization, Literature & Cinema
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. Open to students who have completed three terms of fourth level French and to qualified new students. Students explore works of literature, films, and current events to develop their critical thinking skills and understand the cultural and social contexts of the French-speaking world. The course also includes instruction in language skills and in the methodology of expository writing in French. Students usually take the Advanced Placement French Language exam. The works studied include texts such as Cyrano de Bergerac, Rostand; Candide, Voltaire; Béni ou le paradis privé, Bégag; Paul et Virginie, Bernardin de Saint Pierre; and Mercure, Nothomb; and films such as Le Grand Bleu, Besson; Les 400 Coups, Truffaut; and Le Go,t des Autres, Jaoui.

FREN-600/1, Modern Francophone Literature
Four class periods. A seminar course open to students who have completed 500-level French or the equivalent. The class studies modern novels, plays, poetry, and films. Texts: Moi, Tituba, Sorcierè, Maryse Conde; Métisse blanche, Kim Lefèvre; Cinema for French Conversation, Anne-Christine Rice. (The course structure depends on enrollment and staffing.)

FREN-600/2, Modern Francophone Literature
Four class periods. A seminar course open to students who have completed 500-level French or the equivalent. The course studies modern novels, plays, poetry, and films. The student may write and/or perform a play. Texts: Moi, Tituba, Sorcierè, Maryse Conde; Métisse blanche, Kim Lefèvre; Cinema for French Conversation, Anne-Christine Rice. (The course structure depends on enrollment and staffing.)

FREN-600/3, Modern Francophone Literature
Four class periods. A seminar course open to students who have completed 500-level French or the equivalent. The course studies modern novels, plays, poetry, and films. Texts: Moi, Tituba, Sorcierè, Maryse Conde; Métisse blanche, Kim Lefèvre; Cinema for French Conversation, Anne-Christine Rice. (The course structure depends on enrollment and staffing and may require department permission.)

German

GERM-100/0, First-Level German
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. A yearlong elementary course in speaking, reading, writing, listening comprehension, and culture. No previous experience in German or any other world language is needed to enroll in this course. GERM-100 offers significant daily structure and support in order to facilitate successful language learning. Current text: Deutsch Aktuell 1, 6th edition, supplemented by digital lab exercises, contemporary films, songs and adapted short stories.

GERM-150/5, Accelerated First-Level German
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. Open to students who have completed the fall term of GERM-100 with distinction and who have been recommended by their instructor. Superior work in this course enables students to enter GERM-250 the following fall, followed by GERM-300 in the winter and spring terms, thereby completing three years of the study of German in two years. An accelerated course in grammar, speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and culture. Current texts: Deutsch Aktuell 1, 6th edition, supplemented by video, digital lab exercise, contemporary films, poems, songs, and adapted short stories.

GERM-200/0, Second-Level German
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed GERM-100 or its equivalent. The study of basic grammar, conversation, and reading skills is continued along with the introduction of theme writing. Current texts: with Deutsch Aktuell 1, 6th edition; supplemented by digital lab exercises, contemporary films, songs, and adapted short stories.

GERM-250, Accelerated Second-Level German
Five class periods. Open to students with strong language learning skills who have completed GERM-150 or its equivalent with distinction. This accelerated course covers the spring term GERM-200 syllabus with the addition of intensive grammar review and writing. Successful completion of this course qualifies students to enter GERM-300 in the winter term. Current text: Emil und die Detektive, by Kastner; Vater und Sohn, Eppert; Deutsch heute 9th edition, supplemented by movies and digital lab exercises.

GERM-300/0, Third-Level German
Four class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed GERM-200 or GERM-250 or its equivalent. This course develops the language skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing through the introduction of German texts in the original. Greater emphasis on classroom discussion as well as short essay writing is introduced. Current texts: Vater und Sohn, by E. O. Plauen; Emil und die Detektive, by Kastner; and Biedermann und die Brandstifter, by Frisch. Digital lab exercises, skits, contemporary films, and songs supplement the reading.

GERM-400/1, Fourth-Level German
Five class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed GERM-300 or its equivalent. This course is ideal for students who are looking for a systematic review of the first 3 years of grammar as well as a focus on listening comprehension and speaking. The class will heavily utilize the language learning center for listening and speaking skills, including viewing of and oral responses to contemporary films. Fall Term - grammar, film. Prerequisite: GERM-300 or permission of the department chair.

GERM-400/2, Fourth-Level German
Five class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed GERM-300 or its equivalent. This course is ideal for students who are looking for a systematic review of the first 3 years of grammar as well as a focus on listening comprehension and speaking. The class will heavily utilize the language learning center for listening and speaking skills, including viewing of and oral responses to contemporary films. Winter term - grammar, film, first half of Herr der Diehe (Funke) Prerequisite: GERM-300 or permission of the department chair.

GERM-400/3, Fourth-Level German
Five class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed GERM-300 or its equivalent. This course is ideal for students who are looking for a systematic review of the first 3 years of grammar as well as a focus on listening comprehension and speaking. The class will heavily utilize the language learning center for listening and speaking skills, including viewing of and oral responses to contemporary films. Spring term - film, second half of Herr der Diehe (Funke) Prerequisite: GERM-300 or permission of the department chair.

GERM-520, Advanced Fourth-Level German
Five class periods. The first term of a yearlong sequence, this course is open to students who have successfully completed GERM-300 or its equivalent and whose grammar skills are solid. A guideline is that students should have received an honors grade of 5 or 6 in GERM-300. Vocabulary expansion, increased oral fluency through daily classroom discussion, and written accuracy through paragraph writing and rewriting are central to this course. Selective review of advanced grammar topics is incorporated as needed. Texts: Selected Grimms' fairy tales, short stories by Lenz, Gappmeier and Kästner, current events videos and articles, concrete poetry and Goethe's poem Erlkönig. Prerequisite: GERM-300

GERM-520/5, Advanced Fourth-Level German
Five class periods. A continuation of GERM-520 with increased emphasis on oral proficiency through both informal classroom discussions as well as formal assessments in the LLC (Language Learning Center). Students continue to review advanced grammar as needed, while being exposed to a wider variety of German works in the original. Winter term - Cornelia Funke's novel Herr der Diebe Spring term - AP preparation and D

GERM-600/1, Advanced Topics in German
Four class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed three terms of fourth- level or AP German, or their equivalent, this course varies with the needs of the class. It is usually a seminar in the reading and discussion of German novels and plays. Frequent writing of greater length. Authors currently read: Brecht, Goethe, Kafka, D

GERM-600/2, Advanced Topics in German
Four class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed three terms of fourth- level or AP German, or their equivalent, this course varies with the needs of the class. It is usually a seminar in the reading and discussion of German novels and plays. Frequent writing of greater length. Authors currently read: Brecht, Goethe, Kafka, D

GERM-600/3, Advanced Topics in German
Four class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed three terms of fourth- level or AP German, or their equivalent, this course varies with the needs of the class. It is usually a seminar in the reading and discussion of German novels and plays. Frequent writing of greater length. Authors currently read: Brecht, Goethe, Kafka, D

Greek

GREK-150/0, Greek
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. The course is open to Seniors, Uppers, and others, with the permission fo the department. It covers in one year the essential material of GREK-100 and GREK-200, and basic forms and structure, along with ample selected readings from various Greek authors.

GREK-300/0, Greek
Four class periods. Students will study selected works of Homer, Lysias, Herodotus, or Plato.

GREK-400/1, Fourth-Level Greek: Philosophy and History, Tragedy, Lyric
Four class periods. Ancient concepts of justice and morality are examined through the works of Plato and Thucydides. Human tragedy is explored in a play of Sophocles or Euripides. One term is devoted to the study of emotion and self-expression in the Greek lyric poets.

GREK-400/2, Fourth-Level Greek: Philosophy and History, Tragedy, Lyric
Four class periods. Ancient concepts of justice and morality are examined through the works of Plato and Thucydides. Human tragedy is explored in a play of Sophocles or Euripides. One term is devoted to the study of emotion and self-expression in the Greek lyric poets.

History & Soc. Sci.

HIST-100/0, World History 1000-1550; When Strangers Meet
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. For Juniors. When Strangers Meet explores and connects key episodes in world history that contributed to the emergence of a global network. The course begins with the rise and reach of Islam, then examines the Mongol empire, and ends with the rise of European nation states and their subsequent competition overseas. By delving into specific stories, from Mansa Musa's pilgrimage to Mecca, to Marco Polo's appointment to the court of Khubilai Khan, to the first interactions between European explorers and Native Americans, students examine the political, social, and cultural forces that shaped the development of society from 1000 to 1550. An equally important objective of the course is to hone the skills of historians and social scientists: the abilities to think objectively; to read and evaluate primary documents and secondary materials; to organize outline notes; to distinguish between more and less important evidence to employ in written and oral argument; to use library research tools; and to utilize a variety of textual, visual, statistical, and physical materials to understand and explain the past.

HIST-200, The Early Modern World 1450 - 1750
Four class periods. For Lowers. Focusing on developments in the Atlantic Rim, this course offers a broad historical perspective on the period between 1450-1750. The course examines the exchange of people, goods and ideas among societies based in Europe, Africa and the Americas. Through close scrutiny of the empires that rose and fell on both sides of the Atlantic, this course charts the social, economic, cultural and political development of the Atlantic World during the early modern period. As in HIST-100, a central aim of the course is to enhance student development of the essential skills of historical analysis and exposition. Particular emphasis will be placed on the skills of critical reading and historical writing. To that end, this course culminates with a research project related to key themes in Atlantic history.

HIST-300/4, The United States
A two-term commitment. Four class periods. For Uppers and Seniors. This course, along with HIST-310, completes the department's diploma requirements. The sequence emphasizes three goals: a survey knowledge of American history through World War II; the acquisition of skills by daily exercises in reading, note-taking, and writing; and in-depth study of organizing themes.

HIST-300/5, The United States
A two-term commitment. Four class periods. For Uppers and Seniors. This course, along with History 310, completes the department's diploma requirements. The sequence emphasizes three goals: a survey knowledge of American history through the Great Depression; the acquisition of skills by daily exercises in reading, note-taking, and writing; and in-depth study of organizing themes. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.

HIST-310, The United States
Four class periods. For Uppers and Seniors. Students must take HIST-310 in the term immediately following their completion of HIST-300. The focus is on the United States during and after World War II. Prerequisite: successful completion of History 300/4 or 300/5. Prerequisite: Successful completion of HIST-300/4 or 300/5. Students completing this course who wish to take the College Board Advanced Placement examination should check with their teachers, since extensive review is required.

HIST-320/4, Topics in United States History for International Students
A two-term commitment. Four class periods. A course for entering Seniors for whom English is a second language. The intention of this course is to recognize the particular needs and strengths of students. The content is focused around key questions and issues in United States history. These include how a "democracy" emerged in America, the enduring dilemma of race and ethnicity, the rise of the American economy, and America's role in the world. The course emphasizes writing and language skills by gradually increasing the complexity of assignments and the amount of reading.

HIST-SS480, Disease & Medicine in the United States: Pox & Pestilence
Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. See also SCIE-480. In recent years, historians have begun to understand the impact of disease on the human story and have incorporated it into the more traditional narratives. In common with other parts of the world, the history of the United States has been profoundly influenced by infectious disease. In this course we invite you to come along on a multi-disciplinary journey to explore the impact of disease on the American experience in the 19th and 20th centuries. After exploring the pre-contact situation in the Americas, we will focus on syphilis, smallpox, bacterial sepsis, cholera, yellow fever, malaria, tuberculosis, influenza, polio, HIV/AIDS, and bioterrorism agents such as anthrax. Students will research the role these diseases played in the social, military, and political history of the United States together with the science and medicine that developed in response to them. This is a research seminar and students will use a variety of sources to write a term paper. There is no final examination. A student in this course is elegible for credit in either history or science. A student who wishes to receive history credit should sign up for HIST-SS480; a student who wishes to receive science credit should sign up for SCIE-480. (Ms. Doheny and Dr. Hagler)

HIST-SS485, Out of Tune: Music and the State in The Twentieth Century
One credit assigned in either History or Music. Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. Can governments control culture? What effect can political oppression have on an artist's work? What does it take to be accepted by a totalitarian state as a legitimate composer? Can you determine the real intentions of a composer working under a repressive regime? While some composers enjoyed approval and even served the purposes of the state, the 20th century is rife with examples of composers whose work was compromised, neglected, even forbidden. The rise of the technology of mass media also aided governments in their use of music. Hitler and Stalin, for example, were both masters of propaganda and were acutely aware of the power of music to influence people. The course includes an exploration of the work of Richard Strauss, Dmitri Shostakovich, and Aaron Copland, amongst others, as well as the attitudes of the governments under which they worked. It ends with an examination of the artistic deprivations imposed by the Cultural Revolution in China. Students also will research a case study of their choice. A student who wishes to receive history credit should sign up for HIST-SS485; a student who wishes to receive music credit should sign up for MUSC-485. (Ms. Doheny and Mr. Walter) Prerequisite: Successful completion of a music course at the 200 level or above.

HIST-SS500, American Popular Culture
In this course, students will examine the history of popular culture in the United States. The course will ask students to engage with a variety of popular culture forms (material culture, visual and aural culture, popular literature, etc.) and will introduce them to methodologies from different historical fields and perspectives. Students will investigate popular culture as evidence of the attitudes, assumptions, values, and anxieties of a society. Students will be encouraged to explore the contested meanings of culture, community, and membership in the United States as they cultivate an awareness of the ways popular culture has shaped -and been shaped by- race, class, and gender. Students will study both commercial and noncommercial aspects of popular culture, as well as consider how new forms of technology have altered the ways popular culture is produced and consumed. The course will examine the important role that American popular culture plays-and has played-in globalization. By looking at the products of popular culture historically, students will sharpen their abilities to read critically the popular culture of their own time. There is no final exam. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination.(Ms. Ainsworth)

HIST-SS520, Economics I: Macroeconomics and the Global Consumer
Four class periods per week. The course introduces students to the basic principles of macro- and microeconomics and their application and relevance to national and international public policy. Students examine the development of the contemporary global economy and use basic theoretical tools to analyze current issues. Classes consist primarily of discussions, although the course also employs role-playing, films, lectures, and student reports on their term projects. Students completing this course are eligible to enroll in HIST-SS521 and/or HIST-SS522. Fall Term - Limited to Seniors. Coupled with HIST-SS521 in the winter, the fall course will prepare students to take both the macroeconomics and microeconomics AP exams. Winter Term - Preference to Seniors. Students enrolling in HIST-SS520 in the winter will be prepared to take the macroeconomics AP exam.

HIST-SS521, Economics II: Microeconomics and the Developing World
HIST-SS521 continues the introduction to economics begun in History-Social Science 520. Students utilize the basic principles learned in HIST-SS520 and study microeconomics, theory of the firm, the organization of markets, and the role of governments in all areas of the global economy. Special attention is given to development economics, resource markets, questions concerning racial and gender wage discrimination, and public sector issues such as health care and the economics of the environment. Students also study a range of economic development models and complete an applied research project using such models in relation to a contemporary developing country. Classes consist of discussions, simulations, debates, problem sets, and team research. Prerequisite: Successful completion of HIST-SS520.

HIST-SS522, Economics Research Colloquium
This research colloquium investigates public policy issues in the field of economics. Topics include the debates over sustainable growth, tax reform, supply-side economics, labor organization, national industrial policy, pollution, population growth and welfare policy, and the ethical responsibilities of business. Classes center around discussion of individual students' works in progress; a term paper and presentation on an issue of choice are required. There is no final examination. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. Prerequisite: Successful completion of HIST-SS520.

HIST-SS530, International Relations
This course will introduce the student to international relations by investigating the major schools of thought in international relations. The class also will examine the historical setting in order to understand emerging developments in various areas of the world. Events in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas will be addressed as the current international situation unfolds. Class discussion is a major component of this course. (Mr. Gurry)

HIST-SS531, Comparative Government
This course introduces students to the world's diverse political structures and practices. A comparative study of six nations - Britain, Russia, China, Nigeria, Mexico, and Iran - serves as a core for the course. By examining the political implications of different types of social and economic development, students become familiar both with general political concepts and with a broad array of specific issues, and they are able to use their knowledge as a template for examining how other countries respond to global challenges. Students customarily chose whether to write an in-depth paper or take a final exam. The course does prepare students to take the AP examination in Comparative Government and Politics, though this is not its primary goal.

HIST-SS532/1, Modern East Asia
Each of these courses can be taken separately. If taken as a sequence, they offer students a comprehensive introduction to several of the world's most important countries, the regions they share, and their relations with the rest of the world. In addition to books, students use extensive intranet sites and a film library as resources and in daily assignments. Fall term - Modern East Asia: China, Japan and Korea, studied as a region. Four class periods. This course briefly explores regional history from the late Qing dynasty (China), the Meiji "Restoration" (Japan) and the late Choson dynasty (Korea), before focusing on East Asia in more recent decades. Students are offered an introduction to regional cultures and to an intensive examination of modern issues. Students read a variety of texts, divided among groups. Most recently, the booklist has included: Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower; Samuels, Securing Japan: Tokyo's Grand Strategy and the Future of East Asia; Demick, Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea; Myers, The Cleanest Race; Heo & Roehrig, South Korea Since 1980; Lee, To Kill a Tiger: A Memoir of Korea; and, Snyder, China's Rise and the Two Koreas; as well as other occasional readings and a series of films. Students write a research or other major paper OR a series of short essays, and engage in up to three role-plays. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Drench)

HIST-SS532/2, Modern China & India
Each of these courses can be taken separately. If taken as a sequence, they offer students a comprehensive introduction to several of the world's most important countries, the regions they share, and their relations with the rest of the world. In addition to books, students use extensive intranet sites and a film library as resources and in daily assignments. Winter term - Modern China & India. Four class periods. Following a rapid survey of Chinese and Indian history, the class concentrates on these two "re-emerging" global giants and their inter-relationship since the early 19th century, with major emphasis on the decades since 1945. Required reading includes selections from fiction as well as non-fiction, from print as well as online sources. Students are divided into China and India teams, further divided into Reading Groups that read one book, respectively. Recently, the booklist has included: Boo, Beyond the Beautiful Forevers; Cheng, Factory Girls; Hessler, River Town; Kapur, India Becoming; Mehta, Maximum City; and, Meyer, The Last Days of Old Beijing. Students write a research or other major paper OR a series of short essays. The class participates in Tufts University?s Global Leadership Institute Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship (EPIIC) Symposium in late February. There is no final exam. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Drench)

HIST-SS533/1, The Middle East Asia
Each of these courses can be taken separately. If taken as a sequence, they offer students a comprehensive introduction to a broad swath of the world in which Islam is the most widely practiced faith and with which the United States is intimately involved. Stretching from Morocco to Kashmir, from the Balkans to Sudan and to the former Soviet Central Asian republics, this vast area includes the world's oldest crossroads in the heart of the Middle East and a contemporary cauldron of issues competing for our attention. The courses feature guest speakers, a film library and opportunities for corresponding via email with people in the region. In addition to books, students use extensive intranet sites and a film library as resources and in daily assignments. Fall term ? The Middle East "Heartland." Four class periods. The fall term concentrates on the interior Middle East and North Africa (MENA). We rapidly survey history from the dawn of Islam to the present day and then examine several selected issues in depth. These issues include the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, political Islam, women and minorities, water and oil, the Iraq and other wars, the "Arab Spring" and others that might arise during the term. Students are assigned a variety of readings, including journal articles and primary sources. Assignments include daily readings or videos, three or four short essays, and in-class role-plays, debates, and simulations. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Drench)

HIST-SS533/2, The Middle East Asia
Each of these courses can be taken separately. If taken as a sequence, they offer students a comprehensive introduction to a broad swath of the world in which Islam is the most widely practiced faith and with which the United States is intimately involved. Stretching from Morocco to Kashmir, from the Balkans to Sudan to the former Soviet Central Asian republics, this vast area includes the world's oldest crossroads in the heart of the Middle East and a contemporary cauldron of issues competing for our attention. The class will feature guest speakers, a film series, and opportunities for corresponding via e-mail with students in the region. In addition to books, students use extensive intranet sites and a film library as resources and in daily assignments. Winter term ? The "Greater" Middle East. Four class periods. The winter term concentrates on the area between the Persian Gulf and the borders of Russia and China. There is a historical survey highlighting major themes, followed by an in-depth investigation of modern and contemporary issues. These have included: political Islam; Afghanistan's instability; Iran's revolutions and nuclear program; the partition of India and the Indian-Pakistani rivalry in its Kashmiri and nuclear dimensions; regional energy-related issues; the emergence of Muslim-majority states in Central Asia following the breakup of the USSR; environmental challenges; and the growing importance of the Indian Ocean in global affairs. Students are assigned and/or choose one or two books to read from a varied booklist and utilize an array of online resources, including a film library. Students write a research or other major paper OR a series of short essays, and engage in role-plays and debates. The class participates in Tufts University's Global Leadership Institute Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship (EPIIC) Symposium in late February. There is no final exam. (Mr. Drench)

HIST-SS538, When States Fail
In the past few decades, the world has sadly become acquainted with state governments that do not meet some or all of what conventional wisdom holds to be its basic obligations. In the extreme, these states cease to exist in any meaningful capacity, replaced instead by warfare. How and why does this happen? When no one shows up to fill a seat at the United Nations, what is the impact on the modern world order? How can - and should - other states respond to the threat or reality of political catastrophe? This course is designed for students who want an introduction to the crises of failed or weak states and civil conflict through the lens of political science. Through case study analysis and comparative research, students will improve their research skills and learn from their classmates as well as their instructor. (Mr. Tipton)

HIST-SS540/1, Europe: Birth, Revolution, and War
Each of these courses can be taken separately. One term does not serve as a prerequisite for another. If taken as a sequence, they offer students an overview of the cultural, economic, social, political, and intellectual history of modern Europe from the late Middle Ages to the formation of the European Union. Readings will include Wiesner-Hanks's Early Modern Europe and Merriman's A History of Modern Europe, primary sources, literature, and a variety of secondary readings. Fall term - 1450-1789. Four class periods. Topics include: The Age of Discovery, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the rise of absolutism, the arts and culture of the Baroque period, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. (Dr. Blunt)

HIST-SS540/2, Europe: Birth, Revolution, and War
Each of these courses can be taken separately. One term does not serve as a prerequisite for another. If taken as a sequence, they offer students an overview of the cultural, economic, social, political, and intellectual history of modern Europe from the late Middle Ages to the formation of the European Union. Readings will include Wiesner-Hanks's Early Modern Europe and Merriman's A History of Modern Europe, primary sources, literature, and a variety of secondary readings. Winter term - (1789-1914) Four class periods -- Topics include: The French Revolution and Napoleon, the revolutions of 1848, nationalism and national unification, liberalism, and European imperialism. (Ms. Mulligan)

HIST-SS540/3, Europe: Birth, Revolution, and War
Each of these courses can be taken separately. One term does not serve as a prerequisite for another. If taken as a sequence, they offer students an overview of the cultural, economic, social, political, and intellectual history of modern Europe from the late Middle Ages to the formation of the European Union. Readings will include Wiesner-Hanks's Early Modern Europe and Merriman's A History of Modern Europe, primary sources, literature, and a variety of secondary readings. Spring term - (1914-1992) Four class periods -- Topics include: The Great War, the Russian Revolution, political turmoil in the 1930's, the Second World War, the rebuilding of Europe, Eastern Europe during the Cold War, and the collapse of Communism. Course material overlaps with HIST-SS579 and thus students from fall term HIST-SS579 are not eligible for HIST-SS540/3(Ms. Mulligan)

HIST-SS560, The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1845-1877
"Future years will never know the seething hell and the black infernal background of countless minor scenes and interiors of the Secession War," wrote poet Walt Whitman. This course will investigate all aspects of the American Civil War - its origins, its prosecution, its aftermath, its memory - in a scholarly attempt to comprehend what Whitman suggested was incomprehensible. In the search for the meanings of the war, the class will consider dimensions of American life forever transformed by the conflict: slavery, race, gender roles, citizenship, sectionalism, nationalism, the Constitution, labor, faith, family, and the individual. This is not a course on military history. Readings will be primarily drawn from histories, films, memoirs, poetry, fiction and various primary sources, and may include such authors as: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, Mary Chestnut, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Sherwood Bonner, William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Albion Tourgee, E. L. Doctorow and Toni Morrison. Students will be assessed based on analytical essays and a final exam. (Mr. Jones)

HIST-SS565, The Material Culture of Early America
Four class periods. This course explores the history of multiple Early American societies (with a special emphasis on New England), from the first European contact through the Era of the New Republic by examining the cultural artifacts that these societies left behind. By using works of art, architecture, maps and everyday objects as historical sources, this class will not only investigate the societies out of which these objects come, but it will also explore the value of using non-textual sources to create a historical narrative. This course relies heavily on the collections of the Peabody Museum, the Addison Gallery and the Academy Archives. Students will make weekly visits to one of these three sites where they will have opportunities to learn about and interact with important objects in each collection. By the end of the course, students will have developed a keen understanding of the history of Early America between 1607 and 1812 as well as a sense of the important role of objects as historical sources. The course culminates with a research project wherein students write a "cultural biography" of a particular object within the context of early American history. During this research experience, students will employ historical, archeological and anthropological methodologies in order to develop a multivalent and dynamic vision of material culture as an important form of intellectual inquiry. (Dr. Blunt)

HIST-SS571, Gender Studies In Gender Relations
How does your moment in history shape your sexuality and your identity as a man or a woman? How does your culture shape those same aspects of your self? How do differences of gender create cross-cultural misunderstanding? Who decides what is feminine or masculine? How have mass media shaped our beliefs about gender? This course will include reading, discussions, films, guest speakers, short papers, and a final research project. There is no prerequisite and there is no final examination. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Rotundo)

HIST-SS577D, The United States From Roosevelt to Roosevelt: America in the First Four Decades of the 20th Century
Four class periods. This course focuses on U.S. history starting with the Progressive Era, the 1920s, and the New Deal. As we examine the major reform movements of the Progressive Era, we will see how they were transformed by war and the nation's postwar reaction. We will look at the continuities between the Red Scare of 1919-1920 and the social conflict of the "Roaring Twenties." As we study Franklin Roosevelt's administration in depth and its response to the Great Depression, we also will look at the WPA and other government attempts to reshape American culture. We also will study the response of the press, politicians, and others to the disturbing news of Hitler's repression of the Jews, as well as Eleanor Roosevelt's efforts to help refugees escape Europe. We will explore selected topics in politics, social history, and the culture of the first four decades of the 20th century. (Ms. Dalton)

HIST-SS579, Europe 1914-1945: War and Peace
Four class periods per week. Why did Europe become the battleground for two world wars fought within 25 years of each other? This seminar will examine the political, social, and economic conditions in Europe that set the stage for the bloodletting of the first half of the 20th century. The First World War caused the collapse of empires, the death of millions, and a fissure dividing an idealized old Europe and a disconcertingly modern new one. In the 1920s and 1930s the redrawn map of Europe, socialism, fascism, and Nazism all set the stage for the next great conflagration, while the art and literature of those years expressed key cultural shifts. The Second World War brought horrors that resonate to this day: Auschwitz, the siege of Leningrad, Stalin's purges, and the firebombing of Dresden, and the atomic bomb, to name just a few. When the war finally ended it would take a remarkable shift in thinking to reconstruct a war-torn continent. Readings will include historical narrative, literature, and memoirs. Independent reading, research, and writing will be the basis for assessment. There is no final examination. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Ms. Mulligan)

INTD-400/1, Humanities Writing Seminar
This course focuses on essay writing of all kinds and in all disciplines, including personal essay, critical essay, persuasive essay, literary critique, narrative, historical essay, etc. Students will work in groups to critique each other's work as well as work closely with the instructors on composing, editing and revising. Use of the Academy's Writing Center will be a vital part of the class. Course content will include exploring and responding to the intellectual and cultural resources of the campus. This course is open only to one-year Seniors and may not be taken as part of a four-course schedule. Note: This interdisiplinary course is taught by the English Department specifically to offer an additional opportunity for one-year Seniors to develop writing skills.

INTD-600, Hacking: a Course in Experiments
Four class periods. Open to seniors. In our digitally networked age, the mechanisms of power, control, and creativity are changing rapidly. The rise of the Internet and digital media lead to more than just global connectivity; these shifts affect the relationship between individuals and institutions. This course will examine these changes from the perspective of the hacker: someone who seeks to assert her or himself in this dynamic new environment on and through the network itself. We will adopt an expansive view of hacking, to include not just what one might initially expect (hacking in the sense of wreaking havoc on the network and those who use it) but also activities that remake institutions and systems in positive, or pro-social, ways. We will explore a variety of kinds of hacking, which will range from the creation of destructive forms of malware to the re-imagining of education, libraries, and journalism. The course will be highly interactive, with a great deal of peer-learning and independent research. The course will also include connecting to people outside of Andover as guest participants. No computing experience is required, but a willingness to experiment and to operate in ambiguous, innovative settings is essential. (Mr. Palfrey)

INTD-600/3, Hacking II: A Practicum Hacking Ii: a Practicum
Three class periods. This course is an extension of the winter term offering. Students will meet twice per week with the instructor and an additional time independently. Students will be responsible for the content and for leading the discussions, much as in the case of an independent project. (Mr. Palfrey) Prerequisite: INTD-600

Japanese

JAPA-100/0, First-Level Japanese
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. Open to all students. Seniors may take the course, but in situations of high enrollment, priority will be given to younger students to fulfill language requirement. Students will learn to express themselves in a variety of conversational situations and to read and write hiragana, katakana, and about 15 kanji, or Chinese characters. Classroom instruction will be based on Adventures in Japanese, Book 1, and its corresponding workbook. Students will learn not only the basic grammatical structures but also important elements of Japanese culture.

JAPA-200/0, Second-Level Japanese
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed first-level Japanese or its equivalent. A continuation of JAPA-100, the instruction will be based on Adventures in Japanese, Book 2, and its workbook. In this course there is an increased emphasis on grammar and an additional 150 kanji.

JAPA-300/0, Third-Level Japanese
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed second-level Japanese or its equivalent. Instruction is given based on Adventures in Japanese, Book 3, and its workbook. Emphasis is placed on more conversational practice using the previously learned grammar and more advanced new grammar. Additional emphasis is placed on a significant increase in kanji characters. Students are expected to learn an additional 150 kanji by the end of the course.

JAPA-400/0, Fourth-Level Japanese
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. Open to students who have successfully completed third-level Japanese or its equivalent. Using the advanced textbook of Adventures in Japanese, Book 4, and its workbook, students will learn to express themselves more creatively and to communicate with status-appropriate word usage. Students will learn an additional 150 kanji by the end of the course. Emphasis is placed on more advanced Japanese culture and understanding Japanese history and values. Projects include interviews, research, and the final papers.

JAPA-520/0, Ap Japanese Language and Culture
A yearlong commitment. This course is modeled on the AP syllabus, and is designed to be comparable to college/university Japanese courses where students complete approximately 300 hours of college-level classroom instruction. Like the corresponding college courses, this course supports students as they develop the productive, receptive, and cultural skills necessary to communicate with native speakers of Japanese. Students' proficiency levels at the end of the course are expected to reach the intermediate-low to intermediate-mid range, as described in the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines.

JAPA-600/1, Advanced Topics in Japanese
Four class periods. This course focuses on the development of additional kanji, and on vocabulary expansion through the study of Japanese newspapers, short stories, and a feature-length film. Emphasis is placed on students' listening comprehension and speaking proficiency. Prerequisite: A successful completion of JAPA-400 and/or the approval of the instructor.

Latin

LATN-100/0, First-Level Latin
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. The purpose of the course is to teach students the basic features of the Latin language and of Roman culture in relation to other cultures, e.g., family life and societal relationships, slavery, travel, sports, life in the big city, entertainment, and education. Students learn the traditional forms and syntax. All six tenses, indicative and passive, are covered, as well as all five declensions of nouns, three declensions of adjectives, and the standard pronouns. There is extensive practice in recognizing endings of nouns, adjectives, pronouns, and verbs, as well as case uses and normal Latin sentence structures, with the goal of mastering basic techniques of accurate translation and comprehension of Latin sentences and stories. Students complete the textbook, Jenney's First Year Latin, then study Jenney's Second Year Latin up through the ablative absolute.

LATN-150/0, 1st- & 2nd-Level Latin, Intensive
A yearlong commitment. Five prepared class periods. This course covers in one year the essential elements of LATN-100 and LATN-200.

LATN-200/0, Second-Level Latin
A yearlong commitment. Five prepared class periods. During the fall, the linguistic and cultural approach of ALTN-100 is continued as the class reviews and completes the basic grammar (including participles, subjunctives, and indirect statements) and reads about other aspects of Roman life. In the winter and spring, students read selections from Caesar, Livy, Ovid, and Apuleius' tale of Cupid and Psyche.

LATN-300/0, Third-Level-Latin: Livy, Catullus, Cicero, Vergil
A yearlong commitment. Four prepared classes, all single periods. Students begin the fall with a thorough review of the Latin language in conjunction with correlated reading passages. In the latter half of the fall, students read selections from Livy or Cicero. In the winter, students read the lyric love poetry of Catullus and selections from Cicero's speech, Pro Caelio, defending one of Catullus' former friends against charges brought by the woman to whom Catullus wrote his most famous poems. In the spring, students read selections from Book II of Vergil's Aeneid, the story of the Trojan Horse and the destruction of Troy, a heroic backdrop for very human struggles of duty and loyalty among women and men, parents and children, leaders and followers, humans and their gods.

LATN-520V/0, Vergil
A yearlong commitment. Five prepared class periods. Students read the entire Aeneid in English and substantial selections of Books I, IV, and VI in Latin, examining Vergil's literary form and technique, as well as the philosophical and political dimensions of his age. Book II, which students will have read in the spring of Latin 300, is reviewed quickly. Book I frames Rome's 1,000-year ascendancy in the rivalries of divine wills. Book IV tells the story of the tragic conflict between Aeneas' love for Queen Dido and his obligation to imperial Roman destiny. Book VI features Aeneas' descent into the underworld to gain prophetic visions of Rome's future greatness. Brief selections from Books VII-XII, the "Roman Iliad," round out the readings for the year. Prerequisite: A grade of 5 or higher in LATN-300 or permission of the department.

LATN-600/1, Advanced Latin Authors Seminar
A four-hour class that meets three times a week, this is primarily a literature course with works in the original Latin. Students read Lyric Poetry, beginning with Catullus and continuing with Horace after the midterm. Although their lifetimes overlapped, Catullus flourished during the time of Julius Caesar and the crumbling Roman Republic, whereas Horace wrote his Odes after civil war had established the reign of Augustus, the first emperor of Rome. Beyond appreciating the magnificent and still resonant ars of these two famous poets, students will compare the differences in their styles, personae, and philosophies, and discuss how these reflect not just each artist's poetic voice, but the contemporary political regime as well. Prerequisite: A 5 or above in Latin 520 or permission of the department.

LATN-600/2, Advanced Latin Authors Seminar
A four-hour class that meets three times a week, this is primarily a literature course with works in the original Latin. Students focus on Ancient Rhetoric, beginning with an examination of Platonic vs. Aristotelian ideals of rhetoric, and continuing with a more detailed study of Ciceronian precepts of oratory. While translation and discussion of Cicero's speeches, essays and letters are the focus of this tem's scholarship, students also make connections with modern examples of persuasive technique in the form of advertisement, popular songs, and political speeches. Prerequisite: a 5 or above in Latin 520 or permission of the department.

LATN-600/3, Advanced Latin Authors Seminar
A four-hour class that meets three times a week, this is primarily a literature course with works in the original Latin. Students are treated to a treasury of outstanding excerpts from the works of several Latin authors from the Golden Age, encompassing history, poetry, comedy, and epistolography. Prerequisite: a 5 or above in the fall and/or winter term of Latin 600.

Mathematics

MATH-100/0, Elementary Algebra
Five class periods. A yearlong course for students who have had little or no algebra. Stress is placed on an understanding of the elementary structure and language of the real number system, on the manipulative skills of simplifying expressions and solving first- and second-degree equations, and on the study and graphing of polynomial functions. Work is done with word problems, inequalities, irrational numbers, and right triangle trigonometry. Prerequisite: none.

MATH-150/4, Elementary Algebra
Five class periods. A two-term course for students who have had some algebra. Stress is placed on the manipulative skills of simplifying expressions and solving first- and second-degree equations, and on the study and graphing of polynomial functions. Work is done with word problems, inequalities, irrational numbers, and right triangle trignometry. Prerequisite: A half to a full year of algebra.

MATH-190, Elementary Algebra
Five class periods. A course for students who enter with a full year of algebra and who would benefit from a brief review of algebra. Stress is placed on the manipulative skills of simplifying expressions and solving first- and second-degree equations, and on the study and graphing of polynomial functions. Work is done with word problems, inequalities, irrational numbers, and right triangle trigonometry. Prerequisite: A full year of algebra.

MATH-210, Geometry
Five class periods. A course for students who have had a strong ninth-grade algebra course, but little or no geometry. This course is a thorough and systematic presentation of standard synthetic Euclidean geometry. Emphasis is placed on the need for precision and clarity in the writing of formal proofs. Prerequisites: A complete course in elementary algebra and good algebraic skills.

MATH-220, Geometry
Five class periods. This course continues the work of MATH-210, with increased emphasis on the algebraic and numerical aspects of geometry. Prerequisite: MATH-210.

MATH-280/0, Geometry and Precalculus
Five class periods. A yearlong course for extremely able entering students who have completed with distinction an intermediate algebra course but have not completed a yearlong geometry course. The course covers Euclidean geometry (both synthetic and coordinate) and elementary functions. This course completes the diploma requirement and prepares students to enroll in MATH-380/4. Prerequisite: Placement by the department.

MATH-300/4, Algebra Consolidation
Five class periods. A two-term course for students who have completed a yearlong geometry course and would benefit from algebra review prior to entering the precalculus sequence. The course begins with a comprehensive review of elementary algebra and concludes with topics in intermediate algebra (as listed in the course description of MATH-320). Upon completion of MATH-300, the instructor and department chair will determine whether a student takes MATH-320 or MATH-330 for the spring term.

MATH-320, Precalculus
Five class periods. For returning students, this course is taken after Mathematics 220, Geometry. Topics include properties of real numbers; factoring; fractional and negative exponents; radicals; absolute value; solutions of linear, quadratic, and radical equations; systems of equations and inequalities; and word problems. In addition, students are introduced to the more advanced features of the TI-84 Plus graphing calculator. Prerequisite: MATH-220 or its equivalent.

MATH-330, Precalculus
Five class periods. An introduction and exploration of functions with abstraction. Multiple representations of a function - as a table of values, as a graph, and as an algebraic rule - are a central theme. Elementary functions (polynomial functions and inverse functions, in particular) and their transformations, compositions, and applications are emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH-320 or its equivalent.

MATH-330/3, Precalculus
Five class periods. This is the first course in the off-cycle sequence of our precalculus curriculum, which covers the same topics as the on-cycle sequence but at less depth and with greater focus on essential skills and concepts. This course sequence is recommended for students who complete MATH-300 during their lower or upper years or who are challenged by the pace and depth of our on-cycle sequence. Students that complete this sequence with a grade of 4 or better are prepared to take MATH-575. All other students are prepared to take MATH-510 or -530.

MATH-340, Precalculus
Five class periods. This course focuses on rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The TI-84 Plus is used for continued study of non-linear data sets with special attention to sets that grow exponentially and logarithmically. Elementary work with arithmetic and geometric sequences is included. Prerequisite: MATH-330 or its equivalent. Entering Seniors whose prior work has not satisfied the diploma requirement must complete MATH-340 or MATH-400.

MATH-340/1, Precalculus
Five class periods. This is the second course in the off-cycle sequence of our precalculus curriculum, which covers the same topics as the on-cycle sequence but at less depth and with greater focus on essential skills and concepts. This course sequence is recommended for students who complete MATH-300 during their lower or upper years or who are challenged by the pace and depth of our on-cycle sequence. Students that complete this sequence with a grade of 4 or better are prepared to take MATH-575. All other students are prepared to take MATH-510 or -530.

MATH-350, Precalculus Trigonometry
Five class periods. An exploration of the circular functions: sine, cosine, and tangent. Topics include right triangle trigonometry, simple harmonic motion, applications and proofs of trigonometric identities. Prerequisite: MATH-340 or permission of the department.

MATH-350/2, Precalculus Trigonometry
Five class periods. This is the third course in the off-cycle sequence of our precalculus curriculum, which covers the same topics as the on-cycle sequence but at less depth and with greater focus on essential skills and concepts. This course sequence is recommended for students who complete MATH-300 during their lower or upper years or who are challenged by the pace and depth of our on-cycle sequence. Students that complete this sequence with a grade of 4 or better are prepared to take MATH-575. All other students are prepared to take MATH-510 or -530.

MATH-360, Precalculus Parametric & Polar Curves
Five class periods. Students will learn how to represent points, sketch curves and describe motion in two-dimensional space using parametric equations, polar coordinates and vectors. In addition, students will study the graphs of the conic sections - parabolas, ellipses, and hyperbolas. Mathematics 360 is the final course in the precalculus sequence. Prerequisite: MATH-350 or its equivalent.

MATH-360/3, Precalculus Parametric & Polar Curves
Five class periods. This is the final course in the off-cycle sequence of our precalculus curriculum, which covers the same topics as the on-cycle sequence but at less depth and with greater focus on essential skills and concepts. This course sequence is recommended for students who complete MATH-300 during their lower or upper years or who are challenged by the pace and depth of our on-cycle sequence. Students that complete this sequence with a grade of 4 or better are prepared to take MATH-575. All other students are prepared to take MATH-510 or -530.

MATH-380/4, Accelerated Precalculus
This two-term course begins with a review of polynomial and rational functions and proceeds to cover logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions, inverse functions, parametric equations, polar coordinates, matrices, vectors, complex numbers, and sequences and series. Upon successful completion of MATH-380/4, students will be ready to study MATH-580. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MATH-280/0 with a grade of 4 or higher or placement by the department.

MATH-400, Elementary Functions II
Five class periods. A course primarily for entering Seniors who need to satisfy the diploma requirements in mathematics. The course focuses on functions and their applications, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, circular, and trigonometric functions. Strong emphasis is placed on graphing and the use of graphs as an aid in problem solving. Prerequisite: Credit for three years of high school mathematics or permission of the department.

MATH-400/4, Elementary Functions I
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. This course covers the same topics as MATH-400 but does so in two trimesters instead of one. Prerequisite: Credit for three years of high school mathematics or permission of the department.

MATH-470, Introduction to Discrete Mathematics And Programming
Five class periods. This course blends a study of programming (using the Python programming language) with mathematics relevant to computer science. Students learn how to design simple algorithms and write and test short programs in Python. The course covers Python syntax and style, as well as data types, conditional statements, iterations (loops), and recursion. Selected mathematical topics include sets, number systems, Boolean algebra, counting, and probability. A student in this course is eligible for credit in either mathematics or computer science. A student who wishes to receive mathematics credit should sign up for MATH-470; a student who wishes to receive computer science credit should sign up for COMP-470. Prerequisite: MATH-330 or permission of the department.

MATH-500/3, Advanced Mathematics
Five class periods. This course is a one trimester introduction to calculus. Topics include limits, rates of change, optimization, and areas under curves. Prerequisite: MATH-400/4, or an equivalent course in trigonometry and elementary functions.

MATH-500/5, Advanced Mathematics
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. Primarily for Seniors, but open to other students who want to continue the study of functions and get an introduction to calculus. The calculus topics will include limits, problems of optimization, rates of change, areas under curves, and lengths of curves. Prerequisite: MATH-350, MATH-400, or an equivalent course in trigonometry and elementary functions.

MATH-510, Calculus
Five class periods. Primarily for Seniors. Topics covered include a review of functions and graphing, limits, continuity, determination of derivatives and integrals from graphs of functions (not from their formal definitions). Prerequisite: MATH-360 or its equivalent, or permission of the department chair.

MATH-520/5, Calculus
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. This is a continuation of MATH-510. Topics covered include the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, further differentiation of functions, techniques and applications of integration. The most successful students will be in a position to do the AB Advanced Placement examination in calculus. Prerequisite: A grade of 3 or higher in MATH-510 or permission of the department.

MATH-530, AP Statistics I
Five class periods. The first term of a yearlong sequence that prepares for the Advanced Placement Examination in Statistics. This term primarily covers the exploratory analysis of data, making use of graphical and numerical techniques to study patterns, and developing plans for data collection of valid information. Prerequisite: MATH-350 or its equivalent, or permission of the department.

MATH-530/5, AP Statistics II
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. A continuation of MATH-530, finishing the syllabus for the Advanced Placement examination in May. Topics include probability as the tool for producing models, random variables, independence, normal distribution, simulation, sampling, statistical inference, confidence intervals, and tests of significance. Prerequisite: A grade of 3 or higher in MATH-530.

MATH-560, AP AB Calculus I
Five class periods. This is the beginning of the four-term calculus sequence that, together with MATH-570, covers the syllabus of the AB Advanced Placement examination. This term focuses primarily on differential calculus: limits, continuity, derivatives, and applications of derivatives. Some integral calculus may be covered if time permits. Graphical, numerical, and analytic methods will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: MATH-360 or its equivalent, with no grade lower than a 3 in MATH-340, 350 and 360.

MATH-570, AP AB Calculus II
Five class periods. This course continues the work of MATH-560 in preparation for the AB Advanced Placement examination. Topics include integration and applications of integral calculus. Prerequisite: MATH-560 completed with at least a 3 or MATH-580.

MATH-570/5, AP AB Calculus II (T2)
Five class periods. A continuation of Mathematics 570, finishing the syllabus for the AB Advanced Placement Examination. Prerequisite: Mathematics 570 completed with at least a "3" or Mathematics 590.

MATH-575/0, AP Accelerated AB Calculus
Five class periods. A yearlong course in calculus that begins only in the fall. Satisfactory completion of this course prepares students for the College Board AB Advanced Placement examination. This course does not prepare students for MATH-651 or MATH-661. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: MATH-360 or its equivalent, with no grade lower than a 4 in MATH-340, 350, and 360. Those students who do not meet this requirement should take either MATH-510 or -530.

MATH-580, AP BC Calculus I
Five class periods. This is the beginning of a four-term calculus sequence recommended for students who are well prepared in precalculus. With MATH-590 it covers the syllabus of the BC Calculus Advanced Placement examination. Topics covered include primarily differential calculus: limits, continuity, derivatives, the Chain Rule, related rates, and the Mean Value Theorem. Some integral calculus is also covered. Graphical, numerical, and analytic methods are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: MATH-360 or its equivalent, with no grade lower than a 4 in MATH-340, 350, and 360 and the permission of the department. Those students who do not meet this requirement should take either MATH-510 or 560.

MATH-590, AP BC Calculus II
Five class periods. This course continues the work of MATH-580 in preparation for the BC Advanced Placement examination. Topics include integration and applications of integral calculus. Prerequisite: MATH-580 completed with a grade of at least a 4 or departmental permission.

MATH-590/5, AP BC Calculus II (T2)
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. A continuation of MATH-590, finishing the syllabus for the BC Advanced Placement examination. Prerequisite: MATH-590 completed with a grade of 3 or better and permission of the department.

MATH-595/0, AP Accelerated BC Calculus
Five class periods. A yearlong course in calculus that begins only in the fall. Enrollment is limited to the most able mathematics students. Satisfactory completion of this course prepares students for the College Board BC Advanced Placement examination. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours per week of homework. In order to qualify for this course, returning students must perform satisfactorily on a special precalculus qualifying examination given the previous spring term. Prerequisite: MATH-360 or its equivalent, with no grade lower than a 5 in MATH-340, 350, and 360, plus permission of the department and demonstrated excellence on the MATH-595 qualifying exam.

MATH-630/1, Honors Mathematics Seminar
Four class periods. Each term's seminar will be devoted to one topic, which will be developed in depth. The term's topic will be announced the previous term. Recent offerings include Proof, Biostatistics, Group Theory, History of Mathematics and Non-Euclidean Geometry. Participants need to be prepared to work on one topic in great detail and, in some seminars, to work as part of a team on the solution of problems. Prerequisite: Math-590 or permission of the department.

MATH-630/2, Honors Mathematics Seminar
Four class periods. Each term's seminar will be devoted to one topic, which will be developed in depth. The term's topic will be announced the previous term. Recent offerings include Proof, Biostatistics, Group Theory, History of Mathematics and Non-Euclidean Geometry. Participants need to be prepared to work on one topic in great detail and, in some seminars, to work as part of a team on the solution of problems. Prerequisite: Math-590 or permission of the department.

MATH-630/3, Honors Mathematics Seminar
Four class periods. Each term's seminar will be devoted to one topic, which will be developed in depth. The term's topic will be announced the previous term. Recent offerings include Proof, Biostatistics, Group Theory, History of Mathematics and Non-Euclidean Geometry. Participants need to be prepared to work on one topic in great detail and, in some seminars, to work as part of a team on the solution of problems. Prerequisite: Varies based on the seminar offered. See posted seminar description for more details.

MATH-650, Multivariable Calculus & Linear Algebra
Four class periods. The first trimester of this three-trimester sequence covers functions of many variables, partial differentiation, gradients, vectors, vector valued functions, multiple integration and its applications. During the winter term, the study of multivariable calculus will be completed with line integrals, Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. The remainder of the course covers topics from linear algebra including row reduction, Gaussian elimination, LU decomposition, matrices, vector spaces, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH-590/5 or MATH-595/0, and permission of the department.

MATH-650/5, Multivariable Calculus & Linear Algebra
(A two-term commitment) Four class periods. The first trimester of this three-trimester sequence covers functions of many variables, partial differentiation, gradients, vectors, vector valued functions, multiple integration and its applications. During the winter term, the study of multivariable calculus will be completed with line integrals, Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. The remainder of the course covers topics from linear algebra including row reduction, Gaussian elimination, LU decomposition, matrices, vector spaces, and applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 650 with a grade of 3 or better, or permission of the department.

Music

MUSC-200, The Nature of Music
Five class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors only. This course offers a basic introduction to music literature, theory, performance, and composition. Music from many cultures and historical periods is examined in an attempt to increase student awareness of the patterns of syntax and vocabulary that comprise all musical language. Students compose several original compositions, and they also receive instruction on musical instruments. No previous experience in music is required.

MUSC-225, The Nature of Music A
Five class periods. Open to Juniors and Lowers only. This course offers a basic introduction to music literature, theory, performance, and composition. Music from many cultures and historical periods is examined in an attempt to increase student awareness of the patterns of syntax and vocabulary that comprise all musical language. Students compose several original compositions, and they also receive instruction on musical instruments. No previous experience in music is required.

MUSC-235, The Nature of Music B
Five class periods. Open to Juniors and Lowers only. This course is designed for students who have had some experience reading music and playing an instrument. As a more advanced version of MUSC-225, it will include more extensive experiences in composition. Study of some core works of music literature from a variety of cultures will help develop listening skills, and there will be opportunities for live music-making in class.

MUSC-310, Jazz History
Four class periods. This course begins by examining jazz's mixture of African and European traditions and the subsequent pre-jazz styles of spiritual, blues, and ragtime. We then proceed with a study of 20th century jazz styles beginning with New Orleans and culminating with the multifaceted creations of today's artists. Along the way we pay tribute to the work of some of jazz's most influential innovators, including Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker, and Miles Davis. Original recordings, photographs, and videos are used extensively throughout the term. (Mr. Cirelli)

MUSC-330/1, Topics in Western Music History
Formerly MUSC-250. Five class periods. A one-term survey of Western music history focusing on 18th-century Classicism and 19th-century Romanticism. Music is viewed as a mirror of its time. Selected readings and repertoire from these musical time periods are studied through melody, harmony, rhythm, form, and style, as well as literature, religion, mythology, politics, and biographies. (Mr. Lorenco)

MUSC-330/2, Topics in Western Music History
Formerly MUSC-250. Five class periods. A one-term survey of Western music history focusing on music from the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Contemporary time periods. Included is the study of American music, including jazz and rock genres. Repertoire from these musical time periods is studied through melody, harmony, rhythm, form, and style, as well as literature, religion, mythology, politics, and biographies. (Mr. Lorenco)

MUSC-330A/3, Survey of Music History
Five class periods. A one term survey of Western music history. The course progresses chronologically from classical antiquity to the music of today, exploring along the way the religious, social, historical, and human issues surrounding music and its composition. Students who took MUSC-330/1 and/or MUSC-330/2 are not eligible for this course. (Mr. Lorenco)

MUSC-340, African Music & Culture
Honors/Pass/Fail. Four class periods. This course introduces the role of music in indigenous Africa with an emphasis on Yoruba Orisha Music and its linguistic dimension. It teaches both improvisational and ensemble skills, and cites Santeria, Candomble, Lucumi, Vodum, Shungo, and Bembe as examples of Yoruba- derived cultural and musical practices in the Americas. If failed, this course cannot be made up by examination. In addition, this course cannot be taken as part of a four-course program. A $30 fee is charged for the use of the school's African drums. (Mr. Alade)

MUSC-350, Film Scoring: Influencing Audiences
Five class periods. In this course, students will study film music through extensive compositional exercises, analysis of film music from various genres and time periods, and readings regarding the historical uses and practices of film music composition. The course will begin with an introduction to a wide variety of compositional styles and techniques employed throughout the history of film, including changes resulting from increased technological resources throughout the century. Students will then engage in several composition projects in which they will compose music for film scenes from different genres, such as drama, horror, romance, and action/adventure. Though this course will primarily focus on music from the 20th century, students will also learn about how certain composers connected music to visual images in classical concert music prior to 1900. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a 200-level music course. (Ms. Landolt)

MUSC-360, Electronic Music
Four class periods. This composition course is designed to enable students with modest notational skills to use electronic equipment in order to compose music. Equipment used includes mixing board, analog and four-track tape recorders, digital stereo and eight-track recorders, analog and digitally controlled synthesizers, drum machine, Macintosh computer, and sequencing software (Professional Performer). Projects include compositions in the style of musique concrete and other sound collages using synthesizers. Space limitations in the electronic music studio require that the course be limited to nine students per term. Students must reserve three two-hour private work sessions in the studio per week. A lab fee of $30 is charged for the use of the equipment. This course does not focus on popular music. MUSC-360, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Monaco)

MUSC-400, Introduction to Theory and Composition
Five class periods. This course is designed to give students a vocabulary to further understand and describe the music they will encounter. After beginning the year learning hand-written musical notation, the study of scales, intervals, tonality, harmony, melodic organization, voice leading in two parts and harmonic dictation ensues. After this study is complete, students will be in a position to knowledgeably describe every aspect of a typical piece of music that they may come across. Ear training skills are developed through dictation and sight singing. Students will begin composing near the end of the term, but it should be noted that most compositional activity will be in the winter and spring. Those taking this course in the fall are encouraged to combine it with MUSC-540 and MUSC-550 to form a yearlong AP music theory sequence.

MUSC-410, The Musical Brain
Four class periods. It's difficult to imagine daily life without music or an iPod; music is an integral part of the personal and communal tapestry of daily life. This elective will explore answers to why music matters so much to us as individuals and as a species. We will reflect upon the role of music in our own lives through an introduction to the rapidly evolving field of inquiry and research related to music and the brain. Through reading assignments, listening assignments and classroom activities, we will explore the basic science of sound, musical perception, musical cognition and current theories regarding the role of music in evolutionary biology. Assessment will be based upon regular writing assignments and a culminating final project. (Ms. Aureden) Prerequisite: Successful completion of a music course at the 200-level or above.

MUSC-460, Advanced Electronic Music
Four class periods. This course continues to develop the skills and techniques introduced in MUSC-360. A $30 lab fee is charged for the use of the equipment. MUSC-460, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Monaco) Prerequisite: MUSC-360.

History & Soc. Sci.

MUSC-485, Out of Tune: Music and the State in The Twentieth Century
One credit assigned in either History or Music. Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. See also HIST-SS485. Can governments control culture? What effect can political oppression have on an artist's work? What does it take to be accepted by a totalitarian state as a legitimate composer? Can you determine the real intentions of a composer working under a repressive regime? While some composers enjoyed approval and even served the purposes of the state, the 20th century is rife with examples of composers whose work was compromised, neglected, even forbidden. The rise of the technology of mass media also aided governments in their use of music. Hitler and Stalin, for example, were both masters of propaganda and were acutely aware of the power of music to influence people. The course includes an exploration of the work of Richard Strauss, Dmitri Shostakovich, and Aaron Copland, amongst other case studies, together with the attitudes of the governments under which they worked. It ends with an examination of the artistic deprivations imposed by the Cultural Revolution in China. Students will also research a case study of their choice. A student in this course is eligible for credit in either history or music. A student who wishes to receive history credit should sign up for HIST-SS485; a student who wishes to receive music credit should sign up for MUSC-485. (Mr. Walter and Ms. Doheny) Prerequisite: Successful completion of a 200-level music course.

Music

MUSC-500C, Chamber Music Performance Seminar
Four class periods. This summary course affords students an opportunity to apply their theoretical knowledge to practical music-making through the analysis and performance of chamber music. The process of performance and its attending anxieties will also be studied through readings and exercises. Class work consists of sight-reading, performing, coaching, and discussing chamber works and performance issues. Homework consists of individual practice, group rehearsal, and readings from books about performance. Students are expected to be advanced instrumentalists and they will generally have taken at least MUSC-400. Because different literature is studied each term, this course may be taken more than once. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. If failed, this course cannot be made up by examination.

English

MUSC-530, Brazilian Cultural Studies
One credit assigned in either English or Music. Four class periods. See also ENGL-530AB. Brazil is one of the largest countries in the world, with a diverse population, geography, and cultural makeup. Besides being one of the increasingly powerful BRICS countries, the winner of five soccer World Cups, and the home of the famous Girl from Ipanema, it is also an illustration of how the whole can be greater than the sum of its parts. Its combination of African, European, and native cultures has produced some of the most interesting examples of literature and music in the world. In this course, nineteenth- and twentieth-century Brazil will be studied through the lens of literature, film, art, and music being created at those times. Of special interest will be the literary works of Machado de Assis, Jorge Amado, Clarice Lispector, Carlos Drummond de Andrade, and the participants in the 1922 Week of Modern Art movement, as well as the musical traditions of Europe and Africa that merged in Brazil, producing genres such as chorinho, samba, bossa nova, and tropicalismo. We will also spend some time looking at the current situation in Rio (host of the upcoming finals of the 2014 World Cup and of the 2016 Olympics), especially at how artistic movements promoting social justice and change have been addressing the problems of drug traffic and violence in the favelas. A student in this course is eligible for one credit in either English or music. A student who wishes to receive English credit should sign up for ENGL-530AB; a student who wishes to receive music credit should sign up for MUSC-530 (Dr. Vidal and Mr. Cirelli) Prerequisite: Successful completion of a music course at the 200 level or above.

Music

MUSC-540, Intermediate Theory and Composition
Five class periods. Continuing from where MUSC-400 leaves off, this course begins the students' hands-on compositional development. Small piece are composed almost nightly as students now begin to demonstrate what they previously learned to recognize and describe. Also in this term, students will compose several larger pieces that will be written for, and recorded by, classmates. As the term progresses, the chords of western music are incorporated into their musical vocabulary one by one. Further study in sight singing and ear training help to continue that development. In most years, this term will include a field trip to see the Boston Symphony Orchestra in concert. Prerequisite: MUSC-400 or permission of the instructor.

MUSC-550, Advanced Theory and Composition
Five class periods. Completing the music theory sequence, the focus for the beginning of this term is on preparation for the AP exam in May. Students study non-dominant seventh chords, applied dominant seventh chords and musical form before a week of AP prep. After the AP exam, a larger project is decided upon. Past projects have included studying Chopin's piano preludes, examining poetic meaning in Schubert's songs and composing a 3-5 minute work. Prerequisite: MUSC-540 or permission of the instructor.

MUSC-900, Chorus
Two class periods. Open to all qualified students. The chorus is the Academy's major singing group composed of mixed voices, and it performs a variety of choral works, both sacred and secular. Those wishing to take the course on a non-credit basis need no previous choral participation, just a desire to work hard and attend all the rehearsals. Students taking the course for credit must be taking either voice lessons or a weekly seminar in music theory. If they have not sung in the chorus before, they may take the course for credit only with the permission of the instructor. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Walter)

MUSC-901H, Fidelio Society
Two class periods. Open to all classes. This small group of mixed voices is selected from the chorus (MUSC-900). It performs on numerous occasions throughout the year both on chorus programs and on its own. Its repertoire includes music of all types, early and modern, sacred and secular. Membership is by audition and is conditional upon continued good standing in the chorus. A student may take MUSC-901H and MUSC-900 simultaneously, but only one will be for credit. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Walter)

MUSC-902, Band
Two class periods. Open to all qualified students. Try-outs are held any time before the beginning of a term to test the student's ability and to arrange for seating. There are some school-owned instruments available for student use. All types of music for wind ensemble are rehearsed, including marches as well as classical, popular, and show music. Some sight-reading is done, and at least one public concert per term is given. Students taking this course for credit must be taking either instrumental lessons or a weekly seminar in music theory. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Monaco)

MUSC-903H, Jazz Band
Two class periods. Open to all qualified students. Auditions are held at the beginning of the term, as usually only one player per part is accepted. This ensemble is in a typical big band format and performs the repertoire of the groups of Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Thad Jones, and Woody Herman, as well as contemporary Latin jazz and jazz/rock fusion compositions. Membership is conditional on continued good standing in the band. Students taking this course for credit must be taking either instrumental lessons or a weekly seminar in music theory. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Cirelli)

MUSC-904, Corelli Chamber Ensemble
Two class periods. Open to all classes, but membership consists primarily of Juniors and Lowers. Students taking Corelli Chamber Ensemble for credit attend Symphony Orchestra and Corelli Chamber Orchestra rehearsals each week. The Corelli Chamber Ensemble performs string orchestral literature and performs once each term. Students electing to take Corelli Chamber Ensemble for credit must be taking either instrumental lessons or a weekly seminar in music theory. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Ms. Aureden and Ms. Barnes)

MUSC-905, Amadeus Chamber Ensemble
Two class periods. Open to all classes. Students taking Amadeus Chamber Ensemble for credit attend Symphoney Orchestra and Amadeus Chamber Orchestra rehearsals each week. The Amadeus Chamber Ensemble performs string orchestral literature and performs once each term. Students electing to take Amadeus Chamber Ensemble for credit must be taking either instrumental lessons or a weekly seminar in music theory. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Ms. Landolt)

MUSC-906H, Chamber Orchestra
Two class periods. Open to all classes. Most of the music played is for string orchestra; the best winds in the school are invited to join for larger works. While Chamber Orchestra may be elected as a credit-bearing course, it is also an activity in which all are invited to participate. Students taking this course for credit must be taking either instrumental lessons or a weekly seminar in music theory. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. (Mr. Orent)

MUSC-910, Private Instrument and Voice Lessons
Two class periods per week, plus required attendance at three on-campus concerts per term. Open to Lowers, Uppers, and Seniors. Juniors may enroll in the course only with the permission of the department chair. One class meeting each week is a 30-, 45-, or 60-minute instrumental or voice lesson. The other weekly class meeting is a theory seminar that reinforces notational and aural skills. Lessons are available on all band and orchestral instruments and, in addition, on the piano (classical and jazz), organ, harpsichord, harp, guitar (classical, folk, rock, and jazz), bagpipes, and voice. MUSC-910 as a credit course - instrumental lessons may be taken for credit or non-credit - is designed for students of all levels of ability who wish to study an instrument seriously. Instrumental study should not be entered into lightly: This work requires great commitment, self-motivation, independence, and discipline. In order that maximal progress is accomplished in minimal time, MUSC-910 credit students are expected to practice one hour every day. They must also prepare for a performance of their work at the end of the term. MUSC-910 does not count towards fulfilling a credit of the arts requirement. There is an additional fee for private lessons; information regarding these fees is available through the Department of Music. Keyboard players are assessed a charge of $30 per term for their use of practice pianos and organs. The Academy owns many other instruments that may be rented for $30 per term. Financial assistance for lessons and/or instrument rental is available for students who are on scholarship. A MUSC-910 credit student who is classified by the music department as a beginner MUST take MUSC-910 for two consecutive trimesters. Music 910, if failed, cannot be made up by examination.

Philosophy and Religious Studies

PHRE-310, Religions of the Book: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Four class periods. This course is intended for lowers, but is also open to uppers. This course introduces students to the religious traditions that originated in the Middle East, flourished in and formed the West, and are practiced by people throughout the world today. Using an approach that is both critical and empathetic, students will be introduced to the origins and history of each tradition. They will become acquainted with the fundamental structures of belief and meaning that shaped adherents' lives, the rituals that formed and renewed them, and the social teachings that moved them to action. In doing so, they will learn something about the character of each religious path and about the questions to which we all seek answers.

PHRE-320, Introduction to Hebrew Bible
Four class periods. Not open to Juniors. The sacred writings known as the Hebrew Bible form the scriptural basis for Judaism and Christianity. The books that make up the Hebrew Bible span a broad range of cultures, geographical regions, and time periods. Yet they ultimately form a coherent narrative that has had an enormous influence on religion and culture over thousands of years. How these ancient writings gave rise to new communities and new ways of understanding and living in the world are questions at the heart of this course.

PHRE-330, Introduction to New Testament
Four class periods. This course is intended for lowers, but is also open to uppers. Christianity changed the world. At first a small, persecuted sect, it eventually became the dominant religion of the Roman Empire and the entire Western world. What was behind this "Christian Revolution"? In order to understand the rise of Christian faith, we will study the scriptures of the early church. In this course, we will examine the collection of sacred writings known as the New Testament, focusing on Jesus, Paul, and the wider historical context of first-century Judaism.

PHRE-340, Introduction to Ethics
Four class periods. This course is intended for lowers, but is also open to uppers. Students in this discussion course will be introduced to a variety of approaches to ethical reflection. Through the use of classical texts and personal and literary stories, students will develop a common vocabulary with which to understand and critically evaluate their moral experience.

PHRE-360, Proof and Persuasion
Four class periods. Not open to Juniors. A practical introduction to informal logic and to the philosophical study of language. Some of the questions raised are: What is the difference between a good argument and a poor one? What are the common fallacies of thought? What are the limitations of logic? What are the meaning of "meaning" and the truth about "truth?" The course stresses the development of individual skill in argument and includes a critical examination of the patterns of thought one encounters every day in magazines, in newspapers, and on television.

PHRE-370, Views of Human Nature
Four class periods. Not open to Juniors. A critical examination of selected traditional and contemporary views of human nature with the following questions in mind: Do we have a characteristic nature? What are our basic needs, purposes, rights, obligations, and values? To what extent are our actions determined by heredity and instinct? Are we free? Are we responsible for our actions? Do the answers to any of these questions differ for males and females? Given an understanding of human nature, how should we structure society to satisfy our needs and take advantage of our potential? Class discussions and written exercises are designed to encourage participants to develop views of their own against a background of a basic understanding of the readings.

PHRE-430, Law and Morality
Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors, and to Lowers with permission of the instructor. A critical examination of issues that arise out of the relationship between law and morality. Questions of concern include: For what reasons, if any, should an individual obey or disobey the laws of society? Which kinds of governments (monarchy, aristocracy, democracy, etc.), if any, are legitimate? To what degree should society restrict the freedom of individuals through laws on matters like abortion, pornography, race, and sexual relations? Class discussions and written exercises are designed to encourage participants to develop views of their own against a background of basic understanding of the readings.

Interdisciplinary Science

PHRE-445, Bioethics: Humanity in the Post-Genomic Era
One credit assigned in either Philosophy and Religious Studies or Natural Sciences. Five class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. This course examines current biological topics that challenge our understanding of humanity. We live in a modern age in which major scientific advances are the norm. Bombarded with stories in the news regarding ethical dilemmas pertaining to biomedical advances or interventions, it is often difficult for us to make sense of competing arguments without having a basic command of the biological and philosophical issues involved. Questions to be addressed include: What is a stem cell? When does a developing human being first experience sensation? Show evidence of cognitive abilities? Acquire moral status? How does our modern, post-genomic understanding of human biology influence our definition of humanity? Historical and current readings will be assigned and lively discussions encouraged. students will be graded through a variety of assessments, including papers, projects, and class participation. A student who wishes to receive Philosophy and Religious Studies credit should sign up for PHRE-445; a student who wishes to receive Natural Sciences credit should sign up for SCIE-445. (Drs. Avery & Marshall- Walker) Prerequisite: One yearlong course in biology and one yearlong course in chemistry.

Philosophy and Religious Studies

PHRE-460, Ethics: Medicine
Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. Modern medical research and practice present society with new opportunities and huge challenges. Doctors are guided by both ethics and science in the search for new remedies, the treatment of patients, and the struggle for just social and healthcare policies on a national and global scale. This course provides a brief introduction to ethics, its application to issues in medicine and medical research, and its role in setting public policy. Topics may include the physician/patient relationship, professional codes, international standards in drug development, stem cell therapies, and the provision of healthcare to those in need.

PHRE-470, Ethics: the Environment
Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors, and to Lowers with permission of the instructor. We are facing unprecedented environmental challenges to climate, life forms, human health and population, and essential resources. We tend to treat such issues simply as scientific or political problems. In reality, ecological controversies raise fundamental questions about what we human beings value, the kind of beings we are, the kinds of lives we should lead, and our place in nature. Sustainability is not possible without a deep change of values and commitment. In short, environmental problems raise fundamental questions of ethics and philosophy. This course seeks to provide a systematic introduction to those questions.

PHRE-500, Existentialism
Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. The term existentialism covers a broad range of attitudes and values joined together by an emphasis on human existence. The authors brought together in its name share a characteristic concern for the problems of meaning, identity, and choice that confront men and women in everyday life. The lectures, discussions, and readings are designed to help us locate and express these problems as they confront each of us in our own lives, and to assist in understanding and resolving them by drawing on the experiences and insights of the major existentialist thinkers. Readings include: Nikos Kazantzakis, Zorba the Greek; Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra; Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit and Being and Nothingness; and Soren Kierkegaard, The Sickness unto Death. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours per week of homework.

PHRE-510, Justice and Globalization
Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. What is justice? What is the meaning and worth of calls to fight injustice and to strive to make the world more just? What does the search to understand and promote justice entail in our increasingly interconnected world? What principles, practices, and institutions hold the most promise for securing a desirable future? Through reading, writing, research, presentations, and discussion, participants will work together to develop a deeper understanding of a variety of ways these questions can be thoughtfully and effectively addressed. This class may require more than the standard four to five hours per week of homework.

PHRE-520, Great Philosophers
Four class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. Participants in this upper level course in philosophy will explore a single idea and the questions that arise in its elucidation and application. Topics will change from year to year and may include love, leadership, knowledge, and athletic competition. Important thinkers from a variety of points of view will be consulted. The topic for 2013 is the nature and limits of human knowledge. Readings will be include Plato, Descartes, Mill, Whitehead and assorted moderns. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours per week of homework.

PHRE-533, Abbot Global Scholars: Encounters
One credit assigned in each of English and Philosophy. A multidisciplinary course for seniors that will explore the challenges and opportunities related to globalization and responsible global citizenship in the 21st century. Students will investigate and creatively respond to wealth disparities in local and global contexts and the human rights issues that those disparities represent and engender. We will focus our exploration through the lens of community. How is "community" defined in different contemporary social/cultural contexts? What constitutes a healthy community? What are the conditions that enhance community formation and/or hinder community development? What conditions are required for communities to remain sustainable and vibrant and what conditions function to erode community cohesion, identity, and purpose? What role can individuals play in community formation and development? We will examine these and related questions in dialogue with readings from a variety of genres, films, and guest presentations. Students will shape final projects based on their interests. The course will meet four times during the weekly daily schedule and on Thursday evenings from 5:00-6:30. Students must register for both PHRE-533 and ENGL-533GL/2. (Dr. Moore and Mr. Bardo)

Physics

PHYS-270/0, Introduction to Physics
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. All students who wish to enroll in Physic 270 must secure written permission from the department chair. This course is open to Lowers, Uppers and Seniors who do not yet have the mathematical skills to enroll in Physics 400. An introductory course in the basic concepts of physics that emphasizes student participation. After completion of PHYS-270, students are allowed to take PHYS-400 or PHYS-550 if they meeet the math prerequisite. Corequisite: Registration in Math-210 or higher.

PHYS-395, Classical Mechanics
Five class periods. This is the fall term of PHY-400, for students who do not wish to make a yearlong commitment. Students take the same final exam as the PHYS-400 students. A student who finishes PHYS-395 has the option of continuing in the winter and spring terms of PHYS-400. Prerequisite: Previous completion of or concurrent enrollment in Math-280 or MATH-330.

PHYS-400/0, College Physics
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. A non-calculus physics course, including a study of classical mechanics, electricity, magnetism, wave motion, light, relativity, and atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. The syllabus of this course is appropriate preparation for the College Board Subject Test in physics. This course is for students who have earned a 4 or higher in CHEM-250 or who have completed CHEM-300 or PHYS-270. Co-requisite: Registration in at least MATH-280 or 330 (or permission of the department chair if in MATH-320 in the fall term).

PHYS-440, Astronomy
Four class periods. Astronomy is the scientific study of the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe and the objects in it. Topics may include patterns and motions in the sky, gravity and orbits, telescopes and light, planetary systems, the birth and death of stars, galaxies, the Big Bang, the search for extraterrestrial life, and the fate of the universe. One class period each week will be replaced by a Tuesday evening session in the obervatory. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in one chemistry or physics course, and registration in at least MATH-340.

PHYS-450, Physical Geology
Formerly PHYS-340. Four class periods. A general introduction to physical geology, to include minerals, rocks, measurement of geologic time by radioactivity and fossils, volcanoes, seismology and earth structure, deformation of strata, faults, and plate tectonics. Some of the periods will be used for laboratory work. Prerequisite: Previous completion of one year of physics or chemistry, and registration in at least MASTH-340.

PHYS-520, Electronics
Formerly PHYS-420. Five class periods. A course in modern solid state electronics that considers passive circuit elements and their combinations, diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits. There will be considerable laboratory work. Prerequisite: Previous completion of or concurrent enrollment in PHYS-400, and completion of MATH-360.

PHYS-530, Astronomy Research
Six class periods. In this course students will spend extensive time in the Phillips Academy Observatory where they will learn to operate the telescope, dome, and CCD camera. Students will learn techniques for visual observing, astrophotography, and photometry. Students will engage in research projects designed to provide an introduction to research techniques in astronomy. When appropriate, results will be submitted for publication. In addition to conducting ongoing research projects, the class will take time out to observe interesting current events (observing the pass of a near-Earth asteroid, a recent supernova flare up, a transit of the ISS across the moon, etc.). For the most motivated students, this course will serve as training for an IP in astronomy. The class will meet for three class periods a week. In addition, students will be expected to spend several hours a week in the observatory. Given weather constraints in New England, observing nights will vary. This course, if failed, may not be made up by examination. Prerequisite: PHYS-440. Co-requisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH-510 or MATH-570 or higher. Students not meeting the prerequisite or co-requisite may take the course with the permission of the instructor.

PHYS-530/3, Astronomy Research
Six class periods. This course continues the PHYS-530 sequence. The class will meet for three class periods a week. In addition, students will be expected to spend several hours a week in the observatory. Given weather constraints in New England, observing nights will vary. This course, if failed, may not be made up by examination. Prerequisite: PHYS-530. Co-requisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH-510 or MATH-570 or higher. Students not meeting the prerequisite or co-requisite may take the course with the permission of the instructor.

PHYS-550/0, Calculus-Based Physics
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. Physics 550 prepares students for both Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism of the C level Advanced Placement examination, and entrance to honors- level programs in physics at the university level. Calculus will be used as required. Open to students who (a) will be enrolled in at least MATH-590 or who have completed MATH-575, (b) do not quality for PHYS-580, and (c) have earned a 4 or higher in their two most recent terms of math. PHYS-400 is also an option for these students. This is a rigorous course that may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week.

PHYS-580/4, Calculus-Based Physics
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. This is a rigorous course in mechanics (fall term), and electricity and magnetism (winter term). Calculus will be used as required. This course prepares students for both Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism of the C level Advanced Placement examination, and entrance to honors-level programs in physics at the university level. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: A grade of 6 for the year in PHYS-400 or a grade of 5 for the year in PHYS-400 with department chair permission, and enrollment in at least MATH-590 or its equivalent.

PHYS-600, Foundations of Modern Physics
Four class periods. Relativity and quantum mechanics are two theories that completely revolutionized our thinking about the universe. The course is a survey of the basic ideas underlying these theories. Special mathematical techniques needed for a better understanding of the material are developed in the course. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS-550 or completion of PHYS-580, and enrollment in at least MATH-590.

PHYS-630, Fluid Mechanics
Four class periods. Students taking this course will learn about fluid statics and dynamics. Dimensional analysis and derivation of Bernoulli and Navier-Stokes equations will provide the methods necessary for solving problems. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH-590/0, MATH-595/0 and PHYS-550 or 580.

PHYS-650, Physics Seminar
Four class periods. The focus of this course is intermediate mechanics. Topics will vary according to the interests of the instructor and the students. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH-590 and of the fall trimester of PHYS-550 or 580.

Psychology

PSYC-420, Introductory Psychology
Four class periods, for Uppers and Seniors. A survey course designed to introduce the student to the complexity and diversity of psychological inquiry. Emphasis is placed on the application of basic psychological principles to individual experience in order to expand awareness of both self and others. In addition, the broader implications of psychological findings for an integrated understanding of human development and behavior are considered. Topics to be covered may include psychoanalytic, behavioral and humanistic theories of the person; psychosocial, cognitive, moral and early childhood development; human motivation and personality; social behavior; abnormal behavior; and research techniques in psychology. A combination of objective examinations, individualized writing assignments and an end-of-term research project is utilized to evaluate the student's learning. (Dr. Jackson)

PSYC-430, Developmental Psychology
Four class periods, for Uppers and Seniors. An examination of human growth and development from infancy through adolescence. The role of early experiences and biological factors in later formation of personality and intellectual and motivational behaviors will be considered. Different theoretical perspectives (psychodynamic, social learning and biological) of psychological development will be examined as they relate to developmental milestones. Among the theorists to be studied are Piaget, Erikson, Freud, Gilligan and Bandura. The format of the course includes readings, videos, observations at our day care center, and both group and individual projects. (Dr. Alovisetti)

Russian

RUSS-100/0, First-Level Contemporary Russian
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. A yearlong elementary course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Texts: all-digital textbook developed by the department for exclusive use at Phillips Academy; reference materials. Students enrolling in RUSS-100/0 will use an iPad, in lieu of textbooks or workbooks throughout their Andover Russian career.

RUSS-150/5, Accelerated First Year Russian
Five class periods. Open to students who have completed the fall term of Russian 100 with distinction and who have been recommended by their instructor. Superior work in this course enables students to enter Russian 250 in the fall, followed by Russian 300 in the winter and spring terms, thereby completing three years of Russian language in two years. An accelerated course in grammar, speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and culture, this course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Texts: the same as those of Russian 100 and Russian 200.

RUSS-200/0, Second-Level Contemporary Russian
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. Completion of the elementary course with continued emphasis on active use. Texts: all-digital textbook developed by the department for exclusive use at Phillips Academy; reference materials. (Required iPad) Prerequisite: successful completion of RUSS-100.

RUSS-250, Accelerated Second-Level Russian
Five class periods. Open to students with strong learning skills who have completed RUSS-150 or its equivalent with distinction. This accelerated course completes the work of RUSS-200 with the addition of intensive grammar review and writing. Successful completion of this course qualifies students to enter RUSS-300 in the winter term. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Texts: the same as those of RUSS-200 and fall term of RUSS-300. (Required iPad)

RUSS-300/0, Third-Level Russian
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. Students will improve conversation and composition skills through work with selected 19th and 20th century short stories and with video materials. A review of problematic areas of grammar is integrated into the course. Work with video and audio materials in the Language Learning Center constitutes an important component of the course. (Required iPad) Prerequisite: Successful completion of RUSS-200 or RUSS-250.

RUSS-400/1, Fourth-Level Russian
Four class periods. Expanded work in conversation, listening comprehension and composition. Extensive use of videos as a sourse of culture forconversation and understanding daily speech. Texts will become less modified as the year progresses. Prerequisite: Successful completion of RUSS-300.

RUSS-400/2, Fourth-Level Russian
Four class periods. Expanded work in conversation, listening comprehension and composition. Extensive use of vedeos as a sourse of culture forconversation and understanding daily speech. Texts will become less modified as the year progresses. Prerequisite: Successful completion of RUSS-300.

RUSS-400/3, Fourth-Level Russian
Four class periods. Expanded work in conversation, listening comprehension and composition. Extensive use of vedeos as a sourse of culture forconversation and understanding daily speech. Texts will become less modified as the year progresses. Prerequisite: Successful completion of RUSS-300.

RUSS-520/0, Advanced Fourth-Level Russian
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. The core materials of the course are similar to those used in Fourth-Level Russian. In addition, however, one of the five weekly meetings will be devoted to preparation for the newly announced Advanced Placement Russian test. The additional material will be selected to reflect the structure of the AP exam. This course may require more than the standard four to five hours of homework per week. Prerequisite: Honors grades in RUSS-300 or permission of the department chair.

RUSS-600/1, Advanced Topics in Russian
Four class periods. A central goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of the major themes and developments in the last two centuries of Russian literature and history. Students will be expected to integrate this knowledge into the base they have acquired in their previous Russian study. The spring term works with a historical docudrama of the Stalinist period in the Soviet State. Prerequisite: Successful completion of RUSS-400/3 or RUSS-520.

RUSS-600/2, Advanced Topics in Russian
Four class periods. A central goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of the major themes and developments in the last two centuries of Russian literature and history. Students will be expected to integrate this knowledge into the base they have acquired in their previous Russian study. The spring term works with a historical docudrama of the Stalinist period in the Soviet State. Prerequisite: Successful completion of RUSS-400/3 or RUSS-520.

RUSS-600/3, Advanced Topics in Russian
Four class periods. A central goal of this course is to provide students with an overview of the major themes and developments in the last two centuries of Russian literature and history. Students will be expected to integrate this knowledge into the base they have acquired in their previous Russian study. The spring term works with a historical docudrama of the Stalinist period in the Soviet State. Prerequisite: Successful completion of RUSS-400/3 or RUSS-520.

Interdisciplinary Science

SCIE-410, Env. Science: Global Climate Change
Five class periods. Open to Seniors and to Uppers who have completed one year of laboratory science. This course may be taken in addition to or independently of SCIE-420 and/or 430. This course prepares students to grasp the science behind the politics. The course begins with an overview of climate science, including atmospheric composition, major biogeochemical cycles, principles of energy conservation and flow, the greenhouse effect, atmospheric and oceanic circulation, and natural climate variability. We then investigate recent anthropogenic climate change, examining both causes and consequences. We will primarily consider impacts on ecological systems, but also assess impacts on public health, economics, and global justice. The second half of the course will address the response to global climate change by investigating mitigation strategies. Students will analyze current and potential future sources of energy, both nonrenewable and renewable. Readings will include original scientific literature, nonfiction books and essays, text excerpts, and news coverage.

SCIE-420, Env. Sci : Food,agriculture & the Future
Five class periods. Open to Seniors and to Uppers who have completed one year of laboratory science. This course may be taken in addition to or independently of SCIE-410 and/or 430. This course examines agriculture as a major driver of global environmental change and public health trends. We will explore the demands placed on food production by population growth and a dietary transition, the chemical origins and ecological impacts of fertilizer, and the implications of limited resources of water, land, and oil. The course will integrate fundamental environmental principles of nutrient cycling and energy flow, provide an introduction to environmental economics and policy, and examine how agriculture affects land use, climate change, and biodiversity. We will explore public health impacts of agriculture including food safety, antibiotic resistance, and the rise of obesity and diabetes. Finally, we will consider the future of agriculture and food. Readings will include original scientific literature, nonfiction books and essays, text excerpts, and news coverage. Students should be prepared to undertake a term project.

SCIE-430, Env. Science: Water Resources
Five class periods. Open to Seniors and to Uppers who have completed one year of laboratory science. This course may be taken in addition to or independently of SCIE-410 and/or 420. As complex as natural resource issues are, many still revolve around a simple molecule: water. From desertification to pollution to discussion of "peak water," water shapes the world. This course takes an interdisciplinary and topical look at water, with a focus on freshwater. We will start with an examination of hydrology basics, using Andover as a case study to understand the relationships of groundwater, surface water, aquifers, drinking water, water use, and stormwater management. We will then examine through various lenses including ecology, hydrology, toxicology, economics, and environmental law and policy three major issues related to freshwater: desertification, water quality and pollution, and allocation of global freshwater. Readings will include original scientific literature, nonfiction books and essays, text excerpts, and news coverage. Students should be prepared to undertake a term project.

SCIE-435, Love That Dirty Water: the Global Sanitation Challenge
Five class periods per week. Open to Uppers and Seniors. How often do you give thanks for your toilet? While many of us take this basic convenience for granted, around the world 2.6 billion people lack access to any form of improved sanitation. The public and environmental health impacts would be hard to overstate: water-related diseases kill three million people every year and surface waters around the world have been reduced to sewage drains. The first part of the course will focus on a basic understanding of epidemiology, sanitation's vital link to human health, and the biology of waterborne diseases. We will then investigate the root causes of current global sanitation challenges incorporating key demographic, financial, social and political drivers. Students will also examine case studies to see how effective sanitation practices generate economic benefits, protect the environment, and contribute to dignity and social development. Students will read articles, analyze documents, write weekly short essays - as well as a term research paper - to understand different approaches to improving access and quality of sanitation.

SCIE-445, Bioethics: Humanity in the Post-Genomic Era
One credit assigned in either Philosophy and Religious Studies or Natural Sciences. Five class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. This course examines current biological topics that challenge our understanding of humanity. We live in a modern age in which major scientific advances are the norm. Bombarded with stories in the news regarding ethical dilemmas pertaining to biomedical advances or interventions, it is often difficult for us to make sense of competing arguments without having a basic command of the biological and philosophical issues involved. Questions to be addressed include: What is a stem cell? When does a developing human being first experience sensation? Show evidence of cognitive abilities? Acquire moral status? How does our modern, post-genomic understanding of human biology influence our definition of humanity? Historical and current readings will be assigned and lively discussions encouraged. students will be graded through a variety of assessments, including papers, projects, and class participation. A student who wishes to receive Philosophy and Religious Studies credit should sign up for PHRE-445; a student who wishes to receive Natural Sciences credit should sign up for SCIE-445. (Drs. Avery & Marshall- Walker) Prerequisite: One yearlong course in biology and one yearlong course in chemistry.

SCIE-460, Molecular Gastronomy
Five class periods. The "science of food" may seem like a new fad, but it is really the logical extension of centuries of the study. The understanding of how grapes are transformed into wine and champagne has been known for centuries. The production of cheese by the use of acids, enzymes and bacteria has likewise been handed down through generations and has only recently been both "lost", and then "rediscovered". This class will investigate both the traditional aspects of food science like how cheese is made as well as the cutting edge ideas like how apple juice can be made into "caviar" and how shrimp can be made into "noodles". A significant lab component will allow students to create many of these foods, and laboratories will be held in the instructor's kitchen so that results can be tasted. Prerequisite: One yearlong course in biology and one yearlong course in chemistry.

SCIE-470, Human Origins
Four class periods, including weekly field or laboratory work. Open to Uppers and Seniors. Take a look around. Regardless of where you aer, the consequence of three million years of human evolution is evident. This interdisciplinary science course uses insights drawn fron history, art, archaeology, and other disciplines to chart the human journey fron the hominid to the first civilizations that forecast the modern world. Hands-on laboratory exercises emphasize use of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology collections and challenge students to apply ancient techniques to solve daily problems of survival.

SCIE-480, Disease and Medicine in the United States: Pox and Pestilence
Five class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. See also HIST-SS480. In recent years, historians have begun to understand the impact of disease on the human story and have incorporated it into the more traditional narratives. In common with other parts of the world, the history of the United States has been profoundly influenced by infectious disease. In this course we invite you to come along on a multi-disciplinary journey to explore the impact of disease on the American experience in the 19th and 20th centuries. After exploring the pre-contact situation in the Americas, we will focus on syphilis, smallpox, bacterial sepsis, cholera, yellow fever, malaria, tuberculosis, influenza, polio, HIV/AIDS, and bioterrorism agents such as anthrax. Students will research the role these diseases played in the social, military, and political history of the United States together with the science and medicine that developed in response to them. This is a research seminar and students will use a variety of sources to write a term paper. There is no final examination. A student in this course is elegible for credit in either history or science. A student who wishes to receive history credit should sign up for HIST-SS480; a student who wishes to receive science credit should sign up for SCIE-480.

SCIE-490, The Brain and You: a User's Guide
Five class periods. Open to Uppers and Seniors. See also PSYC-490. The human brain is the most sophisticated biological organ ever evolved on Earth and is the source of all human cognitive functions. Have you ever wondered how yours works? How do you use it to enjoy music, for social relationships, or to experience strong emotions? Have you ever asked yourself whether there are differences between the male and female brains or if the capabilities of the human brain are really unique in the animal kingdom? Join us in this interdisciplinary course as we search for answers to these questions (and more) by examining the evolution and function of the brain and how this applies to understanding the role of the brain in complex human psychology, including the perception, creation, and performance of music, personality, memory, and other higher intellectual activities. A student in this course is elegible for credit in either science or psychology. A student who wishes to receive science credit should sign up for SCIE-490; a student who wishes to receive psychology credit should sign up for PSYC-490. (Dr. Israel and Dr. Hagler)

Spanish

SPAN-100, First-Level Spanish
Five class periods. This course is designed for those students who have had no previous world language experience. The course emphasizes listening comprehension and the use of basic conversational patterns of Spanish speech. Elementary grammatical and idiomatic structures are introduced, as well as appropriate reading material. All classwork is conducted in Spanish. (Text: Descubre I)

SPAN-110, First-Level Spanish
Five class periods. This course is designed for those students who have had previous experience in Spanish or in another world language. The course emphasizes listening comprehension and the use of basic conversational patterns of Spanish speech. Elementary grammatical and idiomatic structures are introduced, as well as appropriate reading material. All classwork is conducted in Spanish. (Text: Descubre I)

SPAN-110/5, First-Level Spanish
A two-term commitment. Five class periods. This course is a continuation of the first-level Spanish course for those students not enrolled in SPAN-120 (Accelerated First Level Spanish). (Text:Descubre I)

SPAN-120/5, Accelerated First-Level Spanish
Five class periods. Especially competent students will be recommended for this accelerated course at the conclusion of SPAN-100/1 or SPAN-110/1. Superior work in SPAN-120 enables recommended students to enter SPAN-220. Descubre 2 serves as the primary text and is supplemented with reading selections and proficiency-oriented exercises.

SPAN-200/0, Second-Level Spanish
A yearlong commitment. Five class periods. Using the Descubre 2 text, this course completes the introduction of grammar begun in the first year. Topics covered are imperfect, imperfect/preterite contrast, subjunctive, perfect tenses, future, and conditional. Extensive thematic vocabulary is integrated into each lesson. There are integrated video and audio programs by which the grammar and vocabulary are reinforced. Significant emphasis is placed on oral praactice. Writing and reading skills are further developed. Various Latin American countries are studied.

SPAN-220, Accelerated Spanish Sequence
Five class periods. SPAN-220 is open only to students who have obtained departmental permission, in most cases after completing SPAN-120. Being part of the accelerated sequence, this course has a pace that may be faster and a workload that may be heavier than usual. Only those students who can demonstrate an accelerated ability to make progress at a rapid pace will be recommended for SPAN-320 sequence during the winter and spring trimesters. Students not recommended for SPAN-320 will rejoin SPAN-200 in order to move at a regular pace more in tune with the student's abilities. SPAN-220 aims at promoting the students' ability to communicate in the target language. Intermediate level grammar is thoroughly reviewed and there is great emphasis on vocabulary building by means of a variety of readings ? short stories and newspaper articles. Students should be ready to engage in conversation on a daily basis, either through group exercises and activities or they are expected to speak up on their own. Passive acquisition without oral participation is not acceptable; the student is required to engage in all four skills on a daily basis: Listening, reading, speaking and writing.

SPAN-300/0, Third-Level Spanish
A yearlong commitment. Four class periods. During the fall term, students read short stories, testimonies, and poems of diverse Hispanic traditions that explore notions of family, individual and collective identities, and personal and social relationships. These texts also serve as structural and thematic models to various written exercises and other class activities. The primary objective of the winter term is to expose students to a challenging and sophisticated literary text, Cronica de una Muerte Anunciada (Chronicle of a Death Foretold), while enforcing their structural skills and communicative competence through a series of grammar, vocabulary, and comprehension exercises based on the novel. In the spring, students read Las Bicicletas Son Para el Verano (Bicycles Are for Summer) and a play about the Spanish Civil War by a contemporary Spanish playwright, and then perform selected scenes from this work.

SPAN-320/5, Accelerated Spanish Sequence
Five class periods. SPAN-320 is open to students who have obtained chair permission, usually after completing SPAN-220 in the fall. At the end of this course, students may usually enroll in courses at the 400-level, which requires considerable knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and the ability to discuss subjects of higher conceptual complexity. Consequently, the range of subjects and genres is expanded. In addition to short stories and articles, students read about current events in the winter and a play, Death and the Maiden, in the spring. Acting out some of the scenes in the play is one of the included oral exercises. Throughout the two terms, students continue to work on their vocabulary and grammar, but more sophisticated and linguistic nuances are added to the student's language repertoire, such as indirect discourse. However, the focus is still on communication and students are expected to be active participants at all times. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.

SPAN-400/1, Current Events and Multimedia: Approaches to the Hispanic World
Four class periods. Fall term - Spain. Students will refine speaking, writing, and listening skills in Spanish as well as their ability to express current issues through a cultural context. This course will use literary texts, film, TV program series, and journalism in order to provide a basis to discuss and understand issues of modern Spain from the post-Franco era to the present. The course will begin a comprehensive review of basic to advanced grammar structures for students thinking about taking the various national Spanish exams. Class requirements include essays, tests, oral class presentations and recordings. Daily class participation is essential.

SPAN-400/2, Current Events and Multimedia: Approaches to the Hispanic World
Four class periods. Winter term - Mexico. Students will refine speaking, writing, and listening skills in Spanish as well as their ability to express current issues through a cultural context. This course will use literary texts, film, and art to provide a basis on which to discuss and understand the historical facts that shaped Mexico from the Mexican Revolution to present. The study of grammar will concentrate on the more challenging structures for English speakers, continuing the grammar review started in the previous SPAN-400/1. Daily class participation is essential.

SPAN-400/3, Current Events and Multimedia: Approachs to the Hispanic World
Four class periods. Spring term - Hispanic Caribbean. Students will refine speaking and writing through the analysis of poetry and short stories of select Caribbean authors. This course will use Caribbean poetry, short stories, film, music, and journalism to provide a basis on which to discuss and analyze current and historical issues of Puerto Rico, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In addition, the course will complete the review of basic to advanced grammar structures started in the fall and winter trimesters. Class requirements will include essays and oral class presentations. Daily class participation is essential.

SPAN-401/1, Introduction to Hispanic Literature
Four class periods. Each trimester the class aims to develop language skills through reading, discussion, oral presentations, and regular writing assignments centered around major writers and texts of the contemporary Hispanic world. This course also emphasizes some of the finer Spanish grammar points and idiomatic expressions. Fall Term - Students will be exposed to short stories by contemporary Latin American and Spanish authors as varied as Carlos Fuentes, J.L. Borges, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, among others. Allende, and others.

SPAN-401/2, Introduction to Hispanic Literature
Four class periods. Each trimester the class aims to develop language skills through reading, discussion, oral presentations, and regular writing assignments centered around major writers and texts of the contemporary Hispanic world. This course also emphasizes some of the finer Spanish grammar points and idiomatic expressions. Winter Term - In the winter, the focus is on Spanish and Spanish-American drama and contemporary Hispanic poetry.

SPAN-401/3, Introduction to Hispanic Literature
Four class periods. Each trimester the class aims to develop language skills through reading, discussion, oral presentations, and regular writing assignments centered around major writers and texts of the contemporary Hispanic world. This course also emphasizes some of the finer Spanish grammar points and idiomatic expressions. Spring Term - Students will read selected literary short novels from the Hispanic world.

SPAN-500, Advanced Spanish Language Colloquium
Four class periods. This advanced, intensive language course is designed for students of Spanish that have completed their language requirement and seek an immersion experience. Students will continue to sharpen their linguistic competencies in speaking, listening, writing and reading and will explore an assortment of authentic media in doing so. These sources will reflect the diversity of registers heard throughout the Spanish speaking world and will expose students to a wide range of cultural, social and historical phenomena. Students will have many opportunities to synthesize and analyze these topics through various communicative modes (interpersonal, interpretive and presentational) in class discussions and written work, in oral/aural exercises in the LLC and in presentations delivered to their peers. Students will complete a research project and participate in a colloquium with the greater Spanish-speaking community. Students who take this course will be prepared to take the AP Spanish Language Exam in May. Materials will include a variety of media from the Spanish-speaking world, a monolingual grammar manual and AP Spanish Language Exam preparation resources. Students must take this course in order to be considered for SPAN-511 in the spring.

SPAN-510, Immersion in Lawrence, an Immigrant City
Four class periods. Lawrence, Massachusetts, has a long history of immigration, beginning during the Industrial Revolution with the Irish and Italians and continuing into the present with an influx of world cultures, predominantly from Caribbean and other Spanish-speaking American nations. For all intents and purposes, modern Lawrence is a Hispanic city, and our involvement there amounts to nothing less than an immersion in the language and culture of an entire hemisphere. This course exposes students to the culturally rich and vibrant "Immigrant City" and helps them understand, through firsthand accounts from members of the Lawrence community, the realities of living in a bicultural, bilingual world. Texts will include popular fiction, prose, journalism and other media in Spanish. At the end of the term, the class will elect a community partner with which to work in the spring, and each individual will design a research project to conduct throughout the following term.

SPAN-511, Community Engagement in Lawrence; We, the People
Four class periods. Students will continue to immerse themselves in the Immigrant City, moving from the theoretical in the winter to the practical in the spring. Having chosen a community partner to work with and research topics to develop, students have more significant input regarding the focus of the class. Students will participate in mini internships or collaborative projects with agencies in Lawrence, thus broadening their own perspectives of Hispanic life in the US while also leaving a "legacy" of cooperation and mutual respect to tie together the Lawrence and Andover communities. Prerequisite: Spanish 500 in the fall. Limited enrollment: Preference is given to students who take Spanish 510 in the winter, though students with considerable experience in Lawrence (i.e. on the level of community service project coordinators) may seek departmental approval. Readings and a daily journal are required in addition to the final research project. Prerequisite: SPAN-500/1

SPAN-520/1, Understanding Latin America
Four class periods. This course is an introduction to the reality of present-day Latin America through the study of its popular culture. The subject is approached from a diachronic perspective starting in the 20th century, which entails reviewing some of the major historical events, but the spotlight is on those aspects of everyday life that play a role in shaping the values of a community or contribute to create a sense of identity: language, religious beliefs, traditions, social movements, sports and cultural production ? music, cinema and television, literature and visual arts. From a linguistic point of view, students will continue to work on the four skills: reading (texts of various genres), writing (expository writing), speaking (oral presentations and daily conversation practice) and listening (in class and at home ? they need to watch a popular telenovela or soap opera). Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed Spanish 400, 401, or 500.

SPAN-520/2, Understanding Latin America
Four class periods. This course is an introduction to the reality of present-day Latin America through the study of its popular culture. The subject is approached from a diachronic perspective starting in the 20th century, which entails reviewing some of the major historical events, but the spotlight is on those aspects of everyday life that play a role in shaping the values of a community or contribute to create a sense of identity: language, religious beliefs, traditions, social movements, sports and cultural production (music, cinema and television, literature and visual arts). From a linguistic point of view, students will continue to work on the four skills: reading (texts of various genres), writing (expository writing), speaking (oral presentations and daily conversation practice) and listening (in class and at home - they need to watch a popular telenovela or soap opera). Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed Spanish 400, 401, or 500.

SPAN-520/3, Understanding Latin America
Four class periods. This course is an introduction to the reality of present-day Latin America through the study of its popular culture. The subject is approached from a diachronic perspective starting in the 20th century, which entails reviewing some of the major historical events, but the spotlight is on those aspects of everyday life that play a role in shaping the values of a community or contribute to create a sense of identity: language, religious beliefs, traditions, social movements, sports and cultural production (music, cinema and television, literature and visual arts). From a linguistic point of view, students will continue to work on the four skills: reading (texts of various genres), writing (expository writing), speaking (oral presentations and daily conversation practice) and listening (in class and at home - they need to watch a popular telenovela or soap opera). Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed Spanish 400, 401, or 500.

SPAN-620/1, Commerce, Culture and Trade: Modern Latin America
Four class periods. This course will study contemporary modern Latin America by employing a wide range of tools - including historical documents, news articles, literary texts, and general economic principles. Students will apply knowledge to Latin American real-world settings, from political systems to economic models, to gain an integrative understanding of this vitally important region. Students will also apply this knowledge of history and political legacy to an understanding of the investment-capital system of stocks, bonds, and commodities in a globalized market. Furthermore, they will study the illegal commerce issues faced by Latin America that challenge the very notion of nation-state. This course is only open to students who have completed a year of Spanish at the -500, -520, or -521 level, or by permission of the chair.

SPAN-620/2, Commerce, Culture and Trade: Modern Latin America
Four class periods. Winter term - this course seeks to augment the vocabulary and conceptual knowledge of the emerging Hispanic markets, while at the same time trying to cast a light on why capitalism, after the fall of the Berlin Wall, has not brought the benefits to Latin America that the Western economies presently enjoy. Readings will be based on leading Latin American and North American economists. Students will work on businesslike cases and must find ways of resolving regional and global market conflicts with respect to natural resources. Students will create a "business case" as to why investors should invest capital in their respective Hispanic company. This aspect of the course will require a high level of businesslike teamwork, in which each member is responsible for the final group grade. Each group will have to prepare various presentations, in which each member of said group is responsible for a particular task. This course is only open to students who have completed a year of Spanish at the -500, -520, or -521 level or by permission of the chair.

SPAN-620/3, Commerce, Culture and Trade: Modern Latin America
Four class periods. Spring term - This course is the third part in a sequence of SPAN-620 that seeks to explain how drug trafficking emerged in Latin America and how it evolved into the multinational illegal commerce that it is today. Students will analyze the origins of the coca trade, its transport and economic aspects, and the cultural underpinnings that made Latin America a region in which drug trafficking could flourish. This course hopes to provide an overview of the complexities of how the history of contemporary Latin America was framed by the drug trafficker and the money launderer, how the product was transported and sold on the black market, and why Latin American nations have such a difficult time preventing the flow of illegal substances, how this challenges the traditional notion of nation-state, and what is considered a rogue state. This course is only open to students who have completed a year of Spanish at the -500, -520, or -521 level, or by permission of the chair.

Theatre & Dance

THDA-210, Acting I
Four class periods. Open to all classes, this course is designed for students with little or no acting experience. By doing exercises in movement and voice production, reading, improvisation, and scenes, a student who is curious about the theatre may determine whether he or she has ability or interest in acting while learning something of the process of characterization, the major responsibility of the actor. The emphasis is on the variety of acting experiences rather than on a polished final product.

THDA-320, Lighting
Four class periods. The course will introduce the student to the art of lighting design while also providing an opportunity to observe light in nature, art, stage, screen, and created environments. The course will allow the individual to gain applied practical understanding regarding the color theory of light, the psychology of color and light, and controllable qualities of light. The design process will be utilized as a method of dramatic interpretation. Artistic expression will be achieved through practical use of lighting instruments, laboratory projects, experiments, and school productions when applicable. (Mr. Murray)

THDA-321, Costuming
Four class periods. An introductory exploration into the areas of costume design and costume construction, this course will highlight primary design elements utilized in costume design for the stage and screen (i.e., line, color, tone, texture, movement, mood composition, balance, and focus). The course will examine historical period silhouette and the art and craft of the stage costume. Practical experience will be given in areas including construction, flat patterning, draping, and fabric manipulation. (Mr. Murray)

THDA-325, Scene Design
Four class periods. This course will introduce the student to the elements that inform the scenic designer's choices (the theme and mood of a script, lines of action, focus, constraints, whimsy) and discuss methods of formulating cohesive, functional, and effective design for a show. The student will be introduced to many materials and techniques available to a designer for realizing his or her ideas as a physical product. Special attention will be spent on the process of the design concept: collaboration, formulation, presentation, discussion, evaluation, and reworking. Students will be graded on both design projects and classroom participation. This is a seminar class that relies upon the open and frank exchange of ideas to stimulate creativity. (Mr. Bacon)

THDA-326, Sound in Theater
Four class periods. This course is an introduction to the art of sound design for the stage. Major topics covered include sound system design and implementation, effects creation, recording techniques, and live reinforcement of actors, singers, and musicians. Students will study audio theory through reading and practical demonstrations, and will develop a working understanding of the often confusing terminology of system components. What's the difference between a balanced and unbalanced cable, and why does it matter? Should I use a condenser or dynamic microphone (and should it be omni, cardioids, or figure 8)? What's phantom power, and when do I need it? Is a feedback destroyer the best way to destroy feedback? (No). Both analog and digital components will be studied. Completion of the course prepares students to design and engineer sound for school theatre productions. (Mr. Bacon)

THDA-330, Theatre Theory and History
Four class periods. Topic for Winter 2014 is Hip Hop Theater History: The Improvisational Now. This course will explore how Hip Hop theater artists, mostly playwright/performers, are redefining theater as we know it. Students will focus on the interplay of concepts that theater and Hip Hop have had on each other, specifically learning about both the history of Hip Hop and conventions of theater. The class will also examine how this particular theater genre blends multi-media platforms with live performance and improvisation, and how it gains inspiration from modern history, personal experiences, popular culture, and social media. Students will take on different roles for each new show, so that they see the creation and production of the show from the perspective of DJ, MC, performer, and director. The class places an emphasis on each student's interpretation of the text and the decisions that flow from that interpretation, and then the justification of those choices, in the creation of hip hop theater as well as theater, itself. (Allen Grimm and Elias Rodrigues) Course Description:

THDA-360, Directing
Four class periods. Since directing plays is the most complex of theatrical tasks, this course will focus on methods to unlock the life of a script in the realization of production. Studies will include historic styles and productions, emphasizing their staging. Students will learn the dynamics of floor plans and their effect on blocking, the potentials for lighting and its effect on mood, the importance of rhythm and spectacle, and strategies to harness them. While no class on directing can function without including discussion of the actor's craft, this class will only touch on this area, which will be further developed in THDA-510. Prerequisite: THDA-210 or permission of the instructor.

THDA-365, Choreographic Elements
This course examines the aesthetic elements of movement through various dance styles. Students will be led through explorations and formal exercises to learn how to generate and manipulate movement in clear and innovative fashions. Course work will culminate in final presentation of original compositions. This class will provide an in-depth study of dance elements and choreographic tools, drawing upon models set forth by Laban, Balanchine, Doris Humphrey, Judson Church, Mark Morris, and Rennie Harris, among others. Ultimately, students will deepen their understanding of movement as a form of communication and expression. This course will require students to rehearse on their own outside of class, as part of the standard four to five hours of homework per week.

THDA-420, Public Speaking
Four class periods. Not open to Juniors. The course has a dual objective: to learn how to speak easily in front of others, and to learn how to construct a speech and perform the speech in English. Students give prepared speeches on a variety of topics.

THDA-510, Acting and Directing Workshop
Four class periods. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. This course, for both the actor and the director, investigates tools to create a character on stage. We will learn to analyze a character and to unlock the toolbox of an actor. Students will take turns between acting and directing scenes after thorough analysis of the material. Course projects will include showing one's work as both actor and director to an actual audience. The total time requirement for this course (class time plus homework) may exceed the standard nine hours per week.

THDA-565, Choreography II
This course is designed to build upon the techniques and elements learned in Choreographic Elements (THDA 365). Students will continue investigating innovative approaches to choreographic design. In consultation with the instructor, each student will design a term-project. In developing their projects, students will be asked to identify a specific choreographic approach they wish to investigate in-depth. Students will participate in guided movement exercises as well as view the works of others to help inform their own work. This course will require students to rehearse on their own, outside of class, as part of the standard five hours of homework per week. (Ms. Strong)

THDA-900H, Andover Dance Group for Credit
The Andover Dance Group (ADG) is an auditioned performance group consisting of the most highly trained and dedicated dancers at Phillips Academy. Students in ADG make a commitment to dance for at least two terms a year, rehearsing for faculty-directed shows as an extra-curricular. Students dance five to six days a week. Serious dancers may be in the ADG each of their years at the Academy. After one year of performing with the ADG, students may choose to take a year for credit. In addition to rehearsals, students taking ADG for credit will be required to take a weekly dance history seminar that relates the current ADG project to a specific time period, movement, choreographer, or style in dance history. This seminar is a one-term commitment. Students may take this option only once, and it will serve to fulfill a term of their arts requirement. The total time commitment for this group (classes, rehearsals, and seminar) may exceed the standard nine hours per week. Co-requisite: Students in Andover Dance Group are required to take dance as a sport.

THDA-902, Advanced Studies in Dance Performance
Enrollment is limited and by approval of the department. Students will apply methodologies learned in previous theater courses to a term-contained project. The focus of this project will be developed by the student(s) with faculty input and approved by the theater department as part of our performance season. The total time required for this course may exceed the standard nine hours per week. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. Students will assume a specific role as choreographer or dancer. Rehearsal schedules will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Students will actively engage in the creative process through identifying a creative problem, researching supportive material, and assessing and revising their work. Students will collaborate with lighting designers as well as other designers/performers as determined. The course will culminate in a performance scheduled in conjunction with the department. Prerequisites: THDA-365 and -370, and project approval from the department.

THDA-903, Advanced Studies in Technical Theatre Production
Enrollment is limited and by approval of the department. Students will apply methodologies learned in previous theater courses to a term-contained project. The focus of this project will be developed by the student(s) with faculty input and approved by the theater department as part of our performance season. The total time required for this course may exceed the standard nine hours per week. This course, if failed, cannot be made up by examination. The exact focus of the project will be developed by the student with faculty input and approved by the theater department. Examples include designing and creating a set of costumes for a dance show or creating a sound design for a THDA-920 production. Students will be expected to work collaboratively with the director and other designers of the show. The course will culminate in execution of their design in a performance scheduled by the department. Prerequisites: THDA-320, THDA-321 or THDA-326, and project approval from the department.

THDA-920/1, Play Production
By audition only. This course is composed of the performance of a faculty-directed play or musical. Recent choices include A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Odd Couple, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Next. The 2013-2014 production schedule will most likely include a classical play such as Shakespeare or Moliere, and a contemporary drama. The total time required for this course (class time plus homework) may exceed the standard nine hours per week.

THDA-920/2, Play Production
By audition only. This course is composed of the performance of a faculty-directed play or musical. Recent choices include A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Odd Couple, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Next. The 2013-2014 production schedule will most likely include a classical play such as Shakespeare or Moliere, and a contemporary drama. The total time required for this course (class time plus homework) may exceed the standard nine hours per week.

THDA-920/3, Play Production
This course is composed of the performance of a faculty-directed play or musical. Recent choices include A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Odd Couple, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Next. The 2013-2014 production schedule will most likely include a classical play such as Shakespeare or Moliere, and a contemporary drama. See PAnet for more details. The total time required for this course (class time plus homework) may exceed the standard nine hours per week.