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Courses

ART-225A, Visual Studies 2D Studio
Five class periods. For Juniors and Lowers. In this studio students use two-dimensional media (e.g.drawing, collage, painting, mixed media, artists' books) and photography to expand their perceptual, conceptual, and technical skills, and develop the visual language needed to communicate their experiences and ideas.

ART-225B, Visual Studies 3D Studio
Five class periods. For Juniors and Lowers. In this studio students use three-dimensional media (e.g. collage, drawing, photography, wire, clay, wax, paper, plaster) and photography to expand their perceptual, conceptual, and technical skills. By expanding their visual literacy students are able to observe, critically and analytically, their surroundings and visual culture.

ART-225C, Visual Studies Media Studio
Five class periods. For Juniors and Lowers. In this studio students make photographs and short videos to focus on two central areas of media: photography and time-based images (film/video). Through projects, presentations, and discussions students explore how these media have changed the ways people perceive the world, and express their ideas and feelings.

ART-300/3, Visual Culture: Discovering the Addison Collection
Four class periods. Throughout the term, students will view selections from the collection of the Addison Gallery as it relates to the history and context of American art. Each week, various themes will be explored and diverse works from the collection will be viewed and discussed from a perceptual point of view. Students will meet the gallery staff and experience what makes a museum function. Readings, writing assignments and research projects will help students engage, confront and discuss a wide range of art forms and imagery. Issues surrounding the making and viewing of art will be explored. As a culminating project for the term, students will curate an exhibition. (Ms. Crivelli and members of the Addison Staff) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-301, Architecture I
Four class periods. This course will introduce the basic principles of architectural design through a sequence of related projects in drawing, site analysis, and research into precedent, culminating in the design of a space or structure. The design projects throughout the three terms will address architectural design in different contexts-a natural setting (Fall), interface with an existing structure (Winter), and in an urban context (Spring), so that a student wishing to continue with architecture at the 401 level can work with a variety of design issues. With hands-on sketches, drawings, and models, students will explore the issues of a well-thought-out structure and learn to see the environment in terms of human scale, materials, and the organization of space. Class time will include discussions and demonstrations, as well as studio time. There will be a required evening lab. A student wishing to take architecture for a full-year should begin with ART-301 in the fall.(Mr. Lawson) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-302, Clay and the Ancestral Pot
Five class periods. This interdisciplinary class explores the exciting intersections between the disciplines of archeology, geology, and studio art. In the studio classroom, students will explore the nature of clay, ceramic techniques, aesthetic considerations, and the role of clay in human evolution. The Peabody Museum of Archeology's collection will offer historical context and a rich array of objects to frame class discussions and assignments. Do you want to dig your own clay? How about using satellite imagery and soil maps to help you find it? In the fall trimester, a field component will take students out into the environment to source and dig residual clays. Students will make their own ceramic artwork from locally sourced and refined clays. The fall-term culminates with the pit firing of hand-made ceramics using traditional - primitive - methods. (Mr. Zaeder) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-304, Drawing I
Four class periods. This course will provide students with a sequential exploration of drawing methods and concepts. Students learn through in-class exercises and formal assignments, skills and concepts relating to contour, gesture and full rendered drawings. Students will work with a variety of materials. Concepts include the depiction of three-dimensional form on a two-dimensional plane, use of light and dark contrast, and use of proportion and perspective sighting. Assignments are designed to develop the students' skills in direct observation and to encourage creative, expressive thinking. Students will work with still life set ups, the surrounding environment and the figure. (Ms. Crivelli, Ms Trespas) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-305, Painting I
Five class periods. This class is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of painting with water-mixable oil paint or acrylic paint. Specific problems are assigned to facilitate the study of fundamental paint handling, color mixing, and blending. Issues of form and space relationships, composition, and development of ideas are addressed in balance with the student's need for self-expression. Class critiques, slide talks, and visits to the Addison Gallery complement and enhance the actual painting process. (Ms. Trespas) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-306, Film Photography
Five class periods. This introductory black and white film course will examine traditional photographic image-making through presentations, demonstrations, and group critique. Beginning with basic camera manipulations and film processing, students will be encouraged to explore the magic of light-sensitive silver materials. Laboratory instruction in printing fine art images with variable contrast filters will be provided. Assignments and discussions of historical landscape, portrait, and/or still-life genres will further aid each student in understanding how a photographer carefully selects and represents his or her vision of the world. A supervised evening lab opportunity provides additional time for technical help and individual critique with the instructor. Cameras will be provided by the art department. (Ms. Harrigan) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-307, Mixed Media Printmaking
Five class periods. Students discover and develop personal imagery while learning several types of printmaking techniques, including relief, monoprint, drypoint, and collography. Images are constructed through collage, drawing, and painting on - and carving into - surfaces such as rubber, wood, metal or plastic. These are inked, in most cases with water based inks, and transferred to paper by hand or by means of a printing press. Often several impressions will be "pulled" from one printing plate and combined with another. A collaborative project, book arts and digital printing methods are also explored. Emphasis is on gaining technical, conceptual, and formal skills while developing a student's ideas through various types of printing and mixed media combinations. Critiques, slide talks, and field trips to the Museum of Printing and the Addison Gallery contribute to student understanding of the history, concepts and processes behind printmaking. (Ms. Trespas) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-308, Sculpture I: Clay, Plaster, Welded Wire and Japanese Papermaking
Five class periods. Sculpture has become an all-inclusive field, with contemporary sculptors working in a wide range of media and inspired by everything from technology, ecology, and the human psyche to literature, music, and the work of other artists. In this same spirit, students will explore a variety of sources, materials and, in some cases, found objects. Through the process of sculpting in clay and building with wire and delicate paper made from mulberry bark, students will develop technical and conceptual skills for working and thinking three-dimensionally. Projects will involve a creative investigation of the expressive potential of materials, structure, imagery, and context through a process of careful observation, experimentation, making, and reflecting. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-309, Video I
Five class periods. This course focuses on storytelling in the time-based medium of video. Students learn to identify stories, develop their ideas using principles and techniques of time-based media, and shoot and edit their own productions. Class time will include viewing and discussing both professional and student work chosen to show ways one conveys ideas by means of images and sound. Following an initial project focused on camera work and editing, there will be four assigned projects (non-fiction, fiction, experimental, and theme-based). Students interested in animation may use animation for these projects. Cameras, microphones, computer editing stations and software will be provided by the Polk-Lillard Center. Students with a background in video who think they may be prepared to go directly into ART-409 should consult with the instructor. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-310, Digital Photography I: The Landscape
Five class periods. This introductory digital photography course examines the concept of beauty in the environment and how we appreciate the poetic or contemplative experience of a photograph. The color theory of light, color management, using adjustment layers, and composite imagery with Adobe Photoshop tools will provide students with the solid knowledge base to produce an edited portfolio or visual book at term's end. Cameras will be provided by the Polk-Lillard Center. (Ms. Harrigan) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-314, Weaving: When the Paleolithic Meets the Digital Age
Five class periods. Weaving dates back to the Paleolithic era and predates the earliest ceramic vessels. At the same time, the seeds of computer technology were sown with the development of the first looms. Later, the punch card technology that was developed to control power looms in the 19th century was adopted by data processing technology in the 20th century. Beginning with this context, this class will provide opportunities to further investigate the rich technical, conceptual, and visual potential of woven structures. Students will experiment with weaving patterns and imagery on frame looms, using decommissioned climbing harnesses and carabineers to make back strap looms, and designing threading patterns (essentially simple coding) for card weaving. Students also will have the opportunity to work on larger floor looms. Shibori (Japanese tie-dye) and indigo dyeing will provide a break between weaving projects at the midpoint in the term. The development ideas and imagery for projects can be inspired by personal interests, contemporary fine art, crafts, and the textile collections at the Peabody Museum and the Addison Gallery. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-319, Documentary Video: Make change!
Five class periods. What do you care about? At PA and in the world? Food waste? Recycling? Diversity? Bullying? The environment? Politics? Surveillance? In this class, students will have the opportunity to develop their own language and visual articulation around the issues that matter most. With input and support from classmates, and through a series of in-class exercises, writings, sound recordings, sketches, and 3D renderings, by the end of the term students will have created compelling videos that express their concerns through moving images. Formats can range from stop motion to video collage and everything in between. Location is an important element in reaching an audience and creating an experience for the viewer, and students will explore presentations of video beyond the monitor, television, and cell phone. Finished projects will be screened on flat screen and projection installations around campus, and through social media. We will look at artists, from the birth of video art in the 1960s to the present, whose works convey their political and personal views through imagery, sound, and action, and who address these issues in unconventional formats. Take advantage of this opportunity to share your ideas and solutions. Get the word out! (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350, or permission of the department chair.

ART-350, The Artist: Media and Meaning
Five class periods. For Uppers and Seniors. This course explores how artists develop images. While learning to think as artists, students will learn to develop ideas using visual language to communicate ideas. Student projects will focus on the expressive possibilities of image making with 2-D media, including the synergy between digital technologies and traditional hands-on applications of materials-digital photography, drawing, and collage. In class presentations and lectures, examples from art, film, and popular culture will provide context for discussions relevant to personal and cultural topics. (Ms. Crivelli, Ms. Zemlin)

ART-400/1, Histories of Art
Five class periods. Michelangelo's David. A three-second Snapchat. The Rothko Chapel. Video of a police officer shooting Tamir Rice. O'Keeffe's Flowers. Images constantly and incessantly bombard us, yet how do we process, deconstruct, and understand them? How do we place them in larger cultural, political, and social contexts? How do we wallow in beauty and magnificence? How do we discern a variety of meanings and best ensure we are not victims of ideology? In this three-term multidisciplinary course, students explore images and objects as primary sources unveiling the values and ideas of the society in which they were produced, and they pay particular attention to the effects of class, economics, gender, national identity, politics, race, religion, sexual orientation, technology, and urbanism on art and visual culture. By focusing on both form and context, students foster a visual literacy that serves them well for a lifetime. Although the course focuses primarily on the traditional "fine" arts, students develop the skills and dispositions to navigate varied elements of contemporary visual culture, including Snapchats and amateur videos. Throughout the year, students use local collections and exhibitions for the study of original works. Students enrolled in Art 400 are also eligible to join an optional study trip to Europe during the spring recess. FALL: The term begins with art as mimesis-as representation of "reality"-in Greece and concludes with its further development during the Renaissance in Italy. Along the way, students encounter creators such as Praxitiles, Giotto, and Leonardo and explore many topics, including: the development of organized labor, the economics of the Medici Bank, the evolution of the social status of some creators from craftsman to artist, the devastation of the Black Death, the gendering of different media (tapestries versus sculpture, for example), and the power of monarchy and papacy. (Mr. Fox) Prerequisite: Open to lowers, uppers and seniors, who may take one, two or three terms; completion of ART-225 or ART-350 is recommended but is not required.

ART-400/2, Histories of Art
Five class periods. Michelangelo's David. A three-second Snapchat. The Rothko Chapel. Video of a police officer shooting Tamir Rice. O'Keeffe's Flowers. Images constantly and incessantly bombard us, yet how do we process, deconstruct, and understand them? How do we place them in larger cultural, political, and social contexts? How do we wallow in beauty and magnificence? How do we discern a variety of meanings and best ensure we are not victims of ideology? In this three-term multidisciplinary course, students explore images and objects as primary sources unveiling the values and ideas of the society in which they were produced, and they pay particular attention to the effects of class, economics, gender, national identity, politics, race, religion, sexual orientation, technology, and urbanism on art and visual culture. By focusing on both form and context, students foster a visual literacy that serves them well for a lifetime. Although the course focuses primarily on the traditional "fine" arts, students develop the skills and dispositions to navigate varied elements of contemporary visual culture, including Snapchats and amateur videos. Throughout the year, students use local collections and exhibitions for the study of original works. Students enrolled in Art 400 are also eligible to join an optional study trip to Europe during the spring recess. WINTER: The term stretches from the Reformation through Impressionism, and students examine themes throughout, including: the evolving tension over the obscuring of boundaries between the wonders of art and the wonders of nature; the gradual shift of sovereignty from pope and king to individual and from patron to artist; the development of photography; the prevalence of rape imagery; the changes in social regulation, spectacle, and exhibition; the rise of "globalism" in London and Paris. Students study artists such as Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Bonheur, Courbet, and Monet. Prerequisite: Open to lowers, uppers and seniors, who may take one, two or three terms; completion of ART-225, ART-250 or ART-350 is recommended but is not required.

ART-400/3, Histories of Art
Five class periods. Michelangelo's David. A three-second Snapchat. The Rothko Chapel. Video of a police officer shooting Tamir Rice. O'Keeffe's Flowers. Images constantly and incessantly bombard us, yet how do we process, deconstruct, and understand them? How do we place them in larger cultural, political, and social contexts? How do we wallow in beauty and magnificence? How do we discern a variety of meanings and best ensure we are not victims of ideology? In this three-term multidisciplinary course, students explore images and objects as primary sources unveiling the values and ideas of the society in which they were produced, and they pay particular attention to the effects of class, economics, gender, national identity, politics, race, religion, sexual orientation, technology, and urbanism on art and visual culture. By focusing on both form and context, students foster a visual literacy that serves them well for a lifetime. Although the course focuses primarily on the traditional "fine" arts, students develop the skills and dispositions to navigate varied elements of contemporary visual culture, including Snapchats and amateur videos. Throughout the year, students use local collections and exhibitions for the study of original works. Students enrolled in Art 400 are also eligible to join an optional study trip to Europe during the spring recess. SPRING: The term covers the end of the 19th century to the present day, and students encounter a range of artists, including: Paul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso, Käthe Kollwitz, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Cindy Sherman, El Anatsui, and Banksy. Among other topics, students explore the fragmentation and disappearance of mimetic art, the global catastrophes of depression and war, the development of the cinema, the feminist art movement and the challenges of intersectionality, the solidification of art as commodity-the economics of the contemporary art market and the politics of museum display-and the postmodern dismantling of the Eurocentric tradition that permeates contemporary visual culture. Prerequisite: Open to lowers, uppers and seniors, who may take one, two or three terms; completion of ART-225, ART-250 or ART-350 is recommended but is not required.

ART-401/1, Architecture II
Four class periods. ART-401 is designed as a continuation of ART-301 for students who wish to develop and expand their ideas further and pursue individualized projects. In consultation with the instructor, students will develop a term project that includes research and analysis, as well as a developed design. In this course there also will be the possibility to develop a multidisciplinary project in coordination with work in another class. A student wishing to take architecture for a full year should begin with ART-301 in the fall. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-501. (Mr. Lawson) Prerequisite: ART-301 or permission of department chair.

ART-401/2, Architecture II
Four class periods. ART-401 is designed as a continuation of ART-301 for students who wish to develop and expand their ideas further and pursue individualized projects. In consultation with the instructor, students will develop a term project that includes research and analysis, as well as a developed design. In this course there also will be the possibility to develop a multidisciplinary project in coordination with work in another class. A student wishing to take architecture for a full year should begin with ART-301 in the fall. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-501. (Mr. Lawson) Prerequisite: ART-301 or permission of department chair.

ART-401/3, Architecture II
Four class periods. ART-401 is designed as a continuation of ART-301 for students who wish to develop and expand their ideas further and pursue individualized projects. In consultation with the instructor, students will develop a term project that includes research and analysis, as well as a developed design. In this course there also will be the possibility to develop a multidisciplinary project in coordination with work in another class. A student wishing to take architecture for a full year should begin with ART-301 in the fall. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-501. (Mr. Lawson) Prerequisite: ART-301 or permission of department chair.

ART-402/2, Advanced Ceramics
Four class periods. This course is designed for students who have completed Clay and The Ancestral Pot (ART-302) and wish to continue their study of ceramics. As an advanced course, students will be asked to expand on their existing knowledge of ceramics, to strengthen their technical skills and to seek sophisticated solutions to given assignments. In addition to their own work in the studio, students can expect to pursue some research and inquiry into the work of contemporary ceramic artists. Outside reading and visits to the Peabody Museum of Archeology will also be a part of the course. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-502. (Mr. Zaeder) Prerequisite: ART-302 or permission of the department chair.

ART-402/3, Advanced Ceramics
Five class periods. This course is designed for students who have completed Clay and The Ancestral Pot (ART-302) and wish to continue their study of ceramics. As an advanced course, students will be asked to expand on their existing knowledge of ceramics, to strengthen their technical skills and to seek sophisticated solutions to given assignments. In addition to their own work in the studio, students can expect to pursue some research and inquiry into the work of contemporary ceramic artists. Outside reading and visits to the Peabody Museum of Archeology will also be a part of the course. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-502. (Mr. Zaeder) Prerequisite: ART-302 or permission of the department chair.

ART-404, Drawing II
Four class periods. This course will focus on thematic subjects and will function on a more advanced level than Drawing I while continuing to stress the balance between perceptual skills, concept/compositional development and technique development. Scale, proportion, spatial studies, the understanding of color and the exploration of mixed-media will be some of the areas covered. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-504. Prerequisite: ART-304 or permission of department chair.

ART-405, Painting II
Five class periods. In advanced painting, students build on already-acquired technical experience from Painting I while developing their own image ideas. Through working from direct observation, technical processes and conceptual approaches, students explore different ways of working with acrylics and water-mixable oils. We will investigate different approaches that generate ideas for paintings. Painting in series, mixing media, innovating paint application, and utilizing collage and assemblage structure further extend the possibilities for thinking about what a painting can be. Emphasis is placed on cultivating solid technical skills as well as inventive and challenging approaches to subjects that encourage individual artistic and personal growth. Critiques, Addison Gallery visits, and exploration of artists' work and art historical issues relevant to the student's paintings are important components of this course. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-505. (Ms. Trespas) Prerequisite: ART-305 or permission of department chair.

ART-406, Special Topics in Photography: Images of Resistance and the Social Documentary Tradition
Four class periods. This course is designed for students who have successfully completed an introductory film (darkroom) or digital photography course and wish to continue with a photographic project in the social documentary tradition. Photographs often serve as powerful historical records of struggle and social change. Class discussions and student presentations will consider how socially responsible photographers represent a collective vision of change and reconciliation. Students will receive editorial guidance on a self-motivated individual or small group documentary project to be presented as an edited portfolio or visual book at the end of the term. Course work requires a working knowledge of either the GW Photography Darkroom Facility or the workflow of digital file management/processing/Photoshop adjustments. (Ms. Harrigan) Prerequisite: ART-306 or -310 or permission of the department chair.

ART-408/2, Sculpture II
Four class periods. This class is an opportunity for students who have taken ART-308 to continue their investigation of sculpture. Another set of technical skills will be taught, along with readings, slide talks, and visits to the Addison Gallery. In developing projects, students will be asked to focus on a particular concept, approach, or set of materials throughout the term. There will be a required evening lab. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-508. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: ART-308 or permission of department chair.

ART-408/3, Sculpture II
Four class periods. This class is an opportunity for students who have taken ART-308 to continue their investigation of sculpture. Another set of technical skills will be taught, along with readings, slide talks, and visits to the Addison Gallery. In developing projects, students will be asked to focus on a particular concept, approach, or set of materials throughout the term. There will be a required evening lab. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-508. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: ART-308 or permission of department chair.

ART-409/1, Video II
Four class periods. This course gives students with a background in video an opportunity to deepen their knowledge. Students design their own projects. Some work on term-long projects while others choose to pursue several short projects. All students will be asked to identify goals for the term and design a term plan to meet their goals. Class time will include viewing and discussing the work of others to inform one's own work. Students enrolled in this course should have previous camera and editing experience. The course will include classes dedicated to introduction or review of Final Cut Pro editing software. Advanced students who wish to continue may enroll in ART-409 for more than one term. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-509. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: ART-309 or permission of department chair.

ART-409/2, Video II
Four class periods. This course gives students with a background in video an opportunity to deepen their knowledge of areas introduced in ART-309 and or pursue directions of their own choosing. Some students work on term-long projects while others choose to pursue several short projects. All students decide on goals for the term and design a term plan to meet their goals. Class time will include viewing and discussing the work of others to inform one's own work. Students enrolled in this course should have previous camera and editing experience. For students unfamiliar with the editing software available to them on compus, this course will include classes dedicated to the editing software used in the Polk-Lillard Electronic Imaging Center. Advanced students who wish to continue may enroll in ART-409 for more than one term. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-509. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: ART-309 or permission of department chair.

ART-409/3, Video II
Four class periods. This course gives students with a background in video an opportunity to deepen their knowledge of areas introduced in ART-309 and or pursue directions of their own choosing. Some students work on term-long projects while others choose to pursue several short projects. All students decide on goals for the term and design a term plan to meet their goals. Class time will include viewing and discussing the work of others to inform one's own work. Students enrolled in this course should have previous camera and editing experience. For students unfamiliar with the editing software available to them on compus, this course will include classes dedicated to the editing software used in the Polk-Lillard Electronic Imaging Center. Advanced students who wish to continue may enroll in ART-409 for more than one term. A student earning an honors grade will be eligible to advance to ART-509. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: ART-309 or permission of department chair.

ART-410, Photography II
Five class periods. This course is designed for students who have successfully completed an introductory film (darkroom) or digital photography course and wish to continue with a photographic project in a genre of their choosing. The class will examine how people choose to represent self and other in studio and on location photography. Studio lighting will be demonstrated. Topics of discussion will range from portraiture to landscape and documentary photography. Students will receive editorial guidance on a photo book or portfolio to be presented at the term's end. Coursework requires a working knowledge of either the Photography Darkroom Facility (in George Washington Hall) or working skills of digital file management/processing/Photoshop adjustments. (Ms. Harrigan) Prerequisite: ART-306 or -310, or permission of department chair.

ART-414, Weaving II
Four class periods. This class is an opportunity for students who have taken ART-314 to continue their investigations of weaving and textiles. Students will further explore the materials and techniques learned in ART-314 in long-term projects or in several shorter term projects, depending on individual interests. Projects should focus on craft and the development of imagery and design. All students will be asked to identify goals for the term and design a term plan. It's recommended that students consult with Ms. Zemlin before signing up for the course. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: Art 314 or permission of department chair.

ART-465, Cultural Perspectives, Global Connections
Four class periods. Open to Lowers, Uppers, and Seniors. This course will study the art and culture of three different countries: China, India, and South Africa. Focusing on the modern and contemporary, this course will travel back and forth in time while viewing a selection of artists and filmmakers from each country whose works are inspired by historic roots and cultural traditions or whose works deliberately address political unrest, human rights, or cultural change. Through viewing, reading, discussion, research, and writing, the class will examine questions such as: How do the objects and images viewed reflect history, identity, and change within each culture? How have historic art forms and cultural traditions transformed and inspired the vibrant and contemporary art perspectives of each country today? How have traditional art forms from China, India, and Africa influenced European and American artists, designers, and collectors over time? Instead of textbooks, an ebook will be used for reading, alongside other digital modes of research and access to information, films and images. (Ms. Crivelli) Prerequisite: Completion of ART-225 or -350 or permission of the department chair.

ART-500/0, Advanced Studio Art
(A yearlong commitment) Five class periods. ART-500 is designed for Uppers and Seniors. The course provides students with the opportunity to broaden their art experience at an advanced level and also study in-depth in areas of their choosing. Students will be guided through the process of assembling portfolios for college applications or Advanced Placement (AP) portfolios. In the fall term, students study broadly at an advanced level using a range of media and techniques. In the winter term students audit a 300/400-level course to focus on a specific medium, while also meeting weekly with the ART-500 class for readings, discussions, Addison Gallery events and field trips to art museums. In the spring term, students work on supervised independent projects that are either discipline-specific or cross-disciplinary in nature. As a culmination of the course students organize, curate, and install an exhibition of their work in the Gelb Gallery. Attendance at a weekly evening lab is required. (Ms. Zemlin) Prerequisite: Open to Uppers and Seniors; Diploma requirement in art and at least two additional 300- or 400-level studio art courses, or permission of department chair.

ART-501/1, Architecture III
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-401 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Lawson)

ART-501/2, Architecture III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-401 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Lawson)

ART-501/3, Architecture III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-401 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Lawson)

ART-502/2, Ceramics III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-402 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Zaeder)

ART-502/3, Ceramics III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-402 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Zaeder)

ART-504, Drawing III
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-404 with an honors grade and with permission of the instructor. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Ms. Crivelli)

ART-505, Painting III
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-405 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Ms. Trespas)

ART-506, Photography III: Special Topics Resistance & the Social Documentary Trad
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-406 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Ms. Harrigan)

ART-509/1, Video III
Four class periods. ART-509 gives advanced students the opportunity to pursue a direction of their own choosing (e.g. several short projects and or a term long project, projects focused on a specific subject of genre, animation, etc.) that meet their goals as filmmakers. As part of their work for the term students design their own production schedule for the term. In addition, all students are required on their own to view work by other filmmakers, write a short paper explaining what may or have influenced their own work, and show examples of this work to the class. At the end of the term students also write an artist's statement about their work and evaluate their work, which includes suggesting a grade for the term. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-509 may be taken more than once. A student with an honors grade or with permission of the instructor will be eligible to advance to ART-609. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: ART-409 or permission of department chair.

ART-509/2, Video III
Four class periods. ART-509 gives advanced students the opportunity to pursue a direction of their own choosing (e.g. several short projects and or a term long project, projects focused on a specific subject of genre, animation, etc.) that meet their goals as filmmakers. As part of their work for the term students design their own production schedule for the term. In addition, all students are required on their own to view work by other filmmakers, write a short paper explaining what may or have influenced their own work, and show examples of this work to the class. At the end of the term students also write an artist's statement about their work and evaluate their work, which includes suggesting a grade for the term. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-509 may be taken more than once. A student with an honors grade or with permission of the instructor will be eligible to advance to ART-609. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: ART-409 or permission of department chair.

ART-509/3, Video III
Four class periods. ART-509 gives advanced students the opportunity to pursue a direction of their own choosing (e.g. several short projects and or a term long project, projects focused on a specific subject of genre, animation, etc.) that meet their goals as filmmakers. As part of their work for the term students design their own production schedule for the term. In addition, all students are required on their own to view work by other filmmakers, write a short paper explaining what may or have influenced their own work, and show examples of this work to the class. At the end of the term students also write an artist's statement about their work and evaluate their work, which includes suggesting a grade for the term. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-509 may be taken more than once. A student with an honors grade or with permission of the instructor will be eligible to advance to ART-609. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: ART-409 or permission of department chair.

ART-510, Photography III: Self and Other
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-410 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 500-level courses may be taken more than once. (Ms. Harrigan)

ART-601/1, Architecture IV
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-501 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 600-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Lawson)

ART-601/2, Architecture IV
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-501 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 600-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Lawson)

ART-601/3, Architecture IV
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-501 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 600-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Lawson)

ART-602/2, Ceramics IV
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-502 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 600-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Zaeder)

ART-602/3, Ceramics IV
This advanced course is open to students upon completion of ART-502 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. 600-level courses may be taken more than once. (Mr. Zaeder)

ART-609/1, Video IV
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students who wish to continue working independently with video after completion of ART-509 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-609 may be taken more than once. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: Honors grade in ART-509 or permission of department chair.

ART-609/2, Video IV
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students who wish to continue working independently with video after completion of ART-509 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-609 may be taken more than once. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: Honors grade in ART-509 or permission of department chair.

ART-609/3, Video IV
Four class periods. This advanced course is open to students who wish to continue working independently with video after completion of ART-509 with an honors grade, or by permission of the instructor and department chair. Students who wish to explore lighting or use a DSLR camera have access to both in this course. ART-609 may be taken more than once. (Ms. Zeltzman) Prerequisite: Honors grade in ART-509 or permission of department chair.